This question is for those studying psychology!!!

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Olords
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#1
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#1
How the hell are we meant to memorise all the case studies....IT'S IMPOSSIBLE!!!!
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mogwai98
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#2
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#2
Keep going over them, it'll have to stick eventually (or at least this is what I'm choosing to believe).

Maybe try flashcards?
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gr8wizard10
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#3
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#3
it's obviously possible if other people have done it.
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Olords
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#4
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#4
(Original post by gr8wizard10)
it's obviously possible if other people have done it.
Do you even do psychology....
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gr8wizard10
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Olords)
Do you even do psychology....
no, i'm at uni, the q you're asking is 'how can i retain masses of information for a specified time period'. I can tell you, i have to know the ongoings of the micro/uk/world economy for my economics exam all the time, so its not very much different to a case study. it's not difficult at all, pick out key points and just ensure you know them, then it's just a process of association. once you have the main points you can construct the relevant story associations, that's where the theory kicks in and re-builds the story (or in your case the case study).

don't memorise stuff, learn it instead.
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schoolgirl1
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#6
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#6
how many case studies are there
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CleverKid96
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#7
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#7
Hi there, I'm a bit of a whizz kid at Psychology. I got almost full UMS in GCSE Psychology (Two or three marks off full marks) and I got 194/200 UMS for my AS in Psychology and I'm currently in A2 Psychology on board to try and get full marks this time round.


I got my grades thanks to God for giving me the ultimate tip: Organisation and Removal of excess information


Grab your specification and follow that strictly to make your own notes AND make sure you try to use all mark scheme notes wherever possible. ONLY use a textbook when the mark scheme can't fulfill that specification point.


Regular studies should follow the Aim (2 marks), Method (6 marks), Results (4 marks), Conclusions (2 marks). I wrote the number of marks indicating that that much detail should be included in your notes. eg Methods for any study should have 6 distinct points as a minimum.
Also, if you're lucky you may get to get all of these marks in your notes just by using the mark schemes alone. (Mark schemes guarantee you a mark whereas textbook marks may not).


Case studies follow a different format:
Aim (2 marks) and case description (6-8 marks) and case analysis (6 marks). The description is essentially what the story is (in brief) and what the researchers had done to the subject. The analysis refers to the observations made and most importantly, what conclusions can be made and what lessons can be learnt from this study.


Do not include any information in your notes that go beyond the "mark limit" for example for a 4 mark results, do not add 6 or 7 points as 4 is enough to get you the mark. Always include a back up mark in case you forget one of them in the exam so put enough info for 5 marks!


Memorise notes by constantly rewriting them; I assume that the third rewrite of your notes should embed it into your head and the 4th one should confirm. After that, get someone to test you on one or two pages everyday and OOOHH don't forget to always always use abbreviations where you can and include bullet points. This makes the information easier to take in.


I hope this helped!
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CleverKid96
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#8
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#8
I forgot to add that each study has an evaluation: Strengths (4 marks so two points needed with an explanation) and the same goes for weaknesses
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Olords
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#9
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#9
(Original post by schoolgirl1)
how many case studies are there
Lol, 16 and counting...
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Async
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#10
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#10
(Original post by gr8wizard10)

don't memorise stuff, learn it instead.
This. I couldn't agree more. Your learning and understanding is much more valuable.
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Olords
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#11
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by CleverKid96)
Hi there, I'm a bit of a whizz kid at Psychology. I got almost full UMS in GCSE Psychology (Two or three marks off full marks) and I got 194/200 UMS for my AS in Psychology and I'm currently in A2 Psychology on board to try and get full marks this time round.


I got my grades thanks to God for giving me the ultimate tip: Organisation and Removal of excess information


Grab your specification and follow that strictly to make your own notes AND make sure you try to use all mark scheme notes wherever possible. ONLY use a textbook when the mark scheme can't fulfill that specification point.


Regular studies should follow the Aim (2 marks), Method (6 marks), Results (4 marks), Conclusions (2 marks). I wrote the number of marks indicating that that much detail should be included in your notes. eg Methods for any study should have 6 distinct points as a minimum.
Also, if you're lucky you may get to get all of these marks in your notes just by using the mark schemes alone. (Mark schemes guarantee you a mark whereas textbook marks may not).


Case studies follow a different format:
Aim (2 marks) and case description (6-8 marks) and case analysis (6 marks). The description is essentially what the story is (in brief) and what the researchers had done to the subject. The analysis refers to the observations made and most importantly, what conclusions can be made and what lessons can be learnt from this study.


Do not include any information in your notes that go beyond the "mark limit" for example for a 4 mark results, do not add 6 or 7 points as 4 is enough to get you the mark. Always include a back up mark in case you forget one of them in the exam so put enough info for 5 marks!


Memorise notes by constantly rewriting them; I assume that the third rewrite of your notes should embed it into your head and the 4th one should confirm. After that, get someone to test you on one or two pages everyday and OOOHH don't forget to always always use abbreviations where you can and include bullet points. This makes the information easier to take in.


I hope this helped!
Thanks for your advice man, must've taken forever to write that, appreciate it.
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CleverKid96
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#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
(Original post by Olords)
Thanks for your advice man, must've taken forever to write that, appreciate it.
No problemo. No point of having knowledge if you can't share it with others.
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