psychology 6 mark abnormality and behavioural model question. please help me >~< Watch

otaku_girlx16
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describe one or more assumptions of the behavioural model in relation to the treatment of abnormality
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by otaku_girlx16)
describe one or more assumptions of the behavioural model in relation to the treatment of abnormality
Heya, I'm going to put this in the psychology forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you!

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=211
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charlie2466
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(Original post by otaku_girlx16)
describe one or more assumptions of the behavioural model in relation to the treatment of abnormality
Here's one of the model answers I have written.... The behavioural approach assumes that all behaviours, normal and abnormal, are learnt through conditioning and experience. This approach focuses on classical conditioning, operant conditioning and social learning as forms of learning. Classical conditioning (learning through association) involves unconditioned responses which, through association, new conditioned stimulus-response reflexes can be learnt. Watson et al demonstrated how people can develop phobias through classical conditioning. They classically conditioned ‘little albert’ to fear fluffy white things by showing him a white rat and presenting a sudden noise that scared him. Albert was therefore conditioned to associate the rat with fear and, because of stimulus-generalisation, he feared all other fluffy animals.
Operant conditioning (learning by reinforcement) demonstrates that abnormal behaviour may be learnt if the behaviour is reinforced and rewarded. For example people who lose weight may be praised which is positively reinforcing so they continue and this could eventually lead o an eating disorder.
The social leaning theory (vicarious learning) is where people learn by imitating role-models. If the person seen is praised and gets positive reinforcement we are more likely to imitate them. This could also be applied to eating disorders.
To evaluate this approach, it does not blame sufferers and therefore is humane and ethical, it is also extremely scientific as it only focuses on observable behaviour which is easily defined and measured and it focuses on present behaviour not the past which is good as memory is not always reliable. However, it is reductionist as it ignores cognitive and genetic influences and there is lots of evidence to show the genetic transmission of some disorders, it is deterministic as it assumes that people do not have free will to decide their behaviours for themselves and it cannot determine why some phobias may be present but not stem from a traumatic encounter.
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charlie2466
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I've also done a list including word documents of the model questions I've done for AQA psychology a for both unit one and unit two -> http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3255595
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otaku_girlx16
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
Heya, I'm going to put this in the psychology forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you!

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=211
awww thank you so much. That's so kind of you
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otaku_girlx16
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(Original post by charlieecooperr)
Here's one of the model answers I have written.... The behavioural approach assumes that all behaviours, normal and abnormal, are learnt through conditioning and experience. This approach focuses on classical conditioning, operant conditioning and social learning as forms of learning. Classical conditioning (learning through association) involves unconditioned responses which, through association, new conditioned stimulus-response reflexes can be learnt. Watson et al demonstrated how people can develop phobias through classical conditioning. They classically conditioned ‘little albert’ to fear fluffy white things by showing him a white rat and presenting a sudden noise that scared him. Albert was therefore conditioned to associate the rat with fear and, because of stimulus-generalisation, he feared all other fluffy animals.
Operant conditioning (learning by reinforcement) demonstrates that abnormal behaviour may be learnt if the behaviour is reinforced and rewarded. For example people who lose weight may be praised which is positively reinforcing so they continue and this could eventually lead o an eating disorder.
The social leaning theory (vicarious learning) is where people learn by imitating role-models. If the person seen is praised and gets positive reinforcement we are more likely to imitate them. This could also be applied to eating disorders.
To evaluate this approach, it does not blame sufferers and therefore is humane and ethical, it is also extremely scientific as it only focuses on observable behaviour which is easily defined and measured and it focuses on present behaviour not the past which is good as memory is not always reliable. However, it is reductionist as it ignores cognitive and genetic influences and there is lots of evidence to show the genetic transmission of some disorders, it is deterministic as it assumes that people do not have free will to decide their behaviours for themselves and it cannot determine why some phobias may be present but not stem from a traumatic encounter.
Thank you soooooo much, this helped me a lot !!! XD
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