Is it possibly to be healthy on a vegetarian diet? Watch

Emaemmaemily
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After having a disagreement with another user elsewhere on TSR about this, I have decided that I should create a thread so that we (and hopefully lots more users) can discuss it in full within derailing other people's threads.

So, can you be healthy on a vegetarian diet? Is it possible not to have any vitamin or mineral deficiencies, or do you have to take supplements?

It would be great if people could provide peer reviewed studies for their answers, not just share their opinion or someone's blog.

Apologies for the typo in the title. I was rushing.
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Emaemmaemily
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Just so that it all makes sense this is a post I was responding to:


(Original post by 41b)
Sources galore: http://chriskresser.com/why-you-shou...nd-vegan-diets

"Vegetarians are less healthy and have a lower quality of life"

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/sc...y-9236340.html

"Vegetarians found to have more cancers, allergies and mental health disorders"

http://www.science20.com/news_articl...sorders-133332

Looking into it more will give you far more answers. There's the possibility that vegetarianism is taken by people who have mental health disorders to begin with, but I said right at the start that this is not a good solution because people still need lots of zinc to truly cure many mental health disorders.

And there are lots of other nutrients that you would not get outside of meat, as the chriskesser article shows.

You're wedded to this green ideology. The girl has clearly said vegetarianism is not for her but you're pushing your viewpoint, regardless of her rejection of vegetarianism. Isn't over-stubbornness a sign of poor mental health?

Edit: Here's 3 more:

"You're a vegetarian. Have you lost your mind?"

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...lost-your-mind

"Here we go again: Vegetarian diets and mental health"

http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogsp...diets-and.html

"Vegetarians displayed elevated prevalence rates for depressive disorders, anxiety disorders and somatoform disorders. Due to the matching procedure, the findings cannot be explained by socio-demographic characteristics of vegetarians (e.g. higher rates of females, predominant residency in urban areas, high proportion of singles). The analysis of the respective ages at adoption of a vegetarian diet and onset of a mental disorder showed that the adoption of the vegetarian diet tends to follow the onset of mental disorders.
"

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3466124/
And this is my response so far (I have run out of time for today, but will be back):


(Original post by Emaemmaemily)
First Source: Not peer reviewed and provides to actual proof.

Second Source: A newspaper article. Not peer reviewed either.
I did look up the original study though here and there are some interesting criticisms that show the research to be very untrustworthy.
For starters, their definition of vegetarians and vegans is wrong. Also, they fail to actually qualify the different types of vegetarians, and do not take into account those who use cheese, butter, and alike. Their statistics are wrong, there is actually no correlation statistically speaking, their maths is entirely wrong. Etc. Read the link for more info on what they've done wrong.

Third Source: Exactly the same as the second. Just another blog quoting the above study.

I've run out of time, but will come back and look into your last sources later on. I am also going to quote you into a new thread, so that we can discuss this properly without derailing someone else's thread any further.
Please feel free to add comments, and discuss this further!
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futbol
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No.

I have never met a vegetarian who wasn't self-righteous and utterly deluded. They're just an inconvenience for others, very selfish.
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miser
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I'm vegetarian and feel perfectly healthy.
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Rakas21
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Yes.

In our modern imported world it's certainly possible however one would have to practice a diet based on education as opposed to a casual meat and two veg. By that i mean that a normal person can fulfill their nutritional requirements simply by eating casually, but vegetarians would need to list the foods which supply nutrient x and y and do research.
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Kvothe the Arcane
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I would have thought so. Perhaps harder on a vegan diet.
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e aí rapaz
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Yes.

In our modern imported world it's certainly possible however one would have to practice a diet based on education as opposed to a casual meat and two veg. By that i mean that a normal person can fulfill their nutritional requirements simply by eating casually, but vegetarians would need to list the foods which supply nutrient x and y and do research.
I disagree. A vegetarian who doesn't ensure they eat a balanced diet may well be deficient in certain vitamins and nutrients. But a meat-eater who doesn't ensure they eat a balanced diet (ie. just a casual "meat and two veg" eater) would be too. Possibly different minerals and vitamins, but no more or less healthy to be honest. The majority of English people, most of whom are omnivores and casual about their diet, are deficient in one or more of Magnesium, vitamin K, D, C, B12, and/or many more.



OP:

General opinion (and endorsement) of the American Dietetic Association:
http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/19562864

Blood pressure:
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/la.../abstract?cc=y

Diabetes:
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/32/5/791.short
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...39475311001700
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...0.03209.x/full

Cardiovascular disease:
http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article...167-4/abstract

Certain cancers (notably bowel and colon cancer):
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/59/5/1143S.short
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Kathy89
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The main problem in vegetarian diet is that they still consume milk and diary products and most of them consume large amounts of eggs. Most of the vegetarians and vegans I know leave on industrial processed meat and milk substitutes that are far less healthy than the meat itself. Only a few of the vegetarians I know eat natural food and eat somehow balanced diet. I know more vegans who eat balanced diet then vegetarians.

I am a vegan for two years and my health never been better. I noticed it this year especially. Much less seasonal allergies, much less digestive problems, and better skin.
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anosmianAcrimony
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(Original post by futbol)
No.

I have never met a vegetarian who wasn't self-righteous and utterly deluded. They're just an inconvenience for others, very selfish.
Quite apart from anything, I don't think you've exactly addressed the question. A person can be selfish, inconvenient, self-righteous, and deluded, and still eat a healthy diet.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by e aí rapaz)
I disagree. A vegetarian who doesn't ensure they eat a balanced diet may well be deficient in certain vitamins and nutrients. But a meat-eater who doesn't ensure they eat a balanced diet (ie. just a casual "meat and two veg" eater) would be too. Possibly different minerals and vitamins, but no more or less healthy to be honest. The majority of English people, most of whom are omnivores and casual about their diet, are deficient in one or more of Magnesium, vitamin K, D, C, B12, and/or many more.



OP:

General opinion (and endorsement) of the American Dietetic Association:
http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/19562864

Blood pressure:
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/la.../abstract?cc=y

Diabetes:
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/32/5/791.short
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...39475311001700
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...0.03209.x/full

Cardiovascular disease:
http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article...167-4/abstract

Certain cancers (notably bowel and colon cancer):
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/59/5/1143S.short
That's interesting. I always though Vitamin C and B12 especially were easy to get.
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polkadotti
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Of course it's possible! You can't just generalise and think that if you cut out meat from your diet you automatically become unhealthy. There are healthy vegos, unhealthy vegos, healthy meat eaters and unhealthy meat eaters. Obviously if you don't do your research and become a processed food mac and cheese kinda vego, you won't be healthy. I am a vegan and feel perfectly fine, and I would actually say that a vegan/vegetarian would be MORE healthy, because due to being told by society that they don't get enough vitamins and minerals, they would most likely make more of an effort to research what their body needs and have a balanced diet. Compared to a meat eater who eats junk but thinks they will get all the right nutrients because they're having slabs of meat every night.
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dinosaurdoodoo
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(Original post by futbol)
No.

I have never met a vegetarian who wasn't self-righteous and utterly deluded. They're just an inconvenience for others, very selfish.
looooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oool
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