The most sensible coalition will be Tory-Lib Dem Watch

Lady Comstock
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All other options are too extreme and will affect our economic recovery.

We should stick with the status quo - a centrist government?
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zippity.doodah
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you're probably right, only because UKIP won't get enough seats
if they did, however, I'd say they'd be the better option
and labour-lib dem, or labour-snp would be too socialist
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gladders
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But the question is whether Tories and Lib Dems alone are enough for a majority. For either side, it looks like rainbow coalitions are coming.
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Studentus-anonymous
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I dunno, we've already experienced a Tory-LibDem coalition and we already know that means a government hostile to the British public broadly, more vicious cuts, and an anaemic and broken LibDem party that cannot reign in the Tories habit of losing sight of the greater good of everyone rather than just the top half of the socio-economic ladder.

It's all academic anyway since the LibDems are done as a party. They used to get my vote as a habit, but they're dead to me.

I suspect that after this election they're going to return as a faded mirage of their former selves. Sucks for the Lib Dems but does leave open space for other parties to fight over the third-place spot.
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Comeback
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Labour-Lib would be ok too. People exaggerate the differences between Labour and the Conservatives. Labour have been moving for decades closer towards the Conservatives.

Ed Miliband's catchphrase is now even: 'we'll reduce the deficit and balance the books'.
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a96clark
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Lib dem are currently less supported than the 'other' category in most polls. I don't think they'll have much power to form a coalition
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Davij038
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(Original post by a96clark)
Lib dem are currently less supported than the 'other' category in most polls. I don't think they'll have much power to form a coalition
UKIP are now popular than the LIb Dems in terms of nation wide votes, but that wont translate into more votes. The Greens peaked at the same level of support as the Lib dems but plummeted after people saw that particular interview.

I would ever so slightly prefer a labour-lib dem coalition to a Tory one, more in the hope to regain support for the party once people remember how useless Labour are and should hopefully see the Libs as holding the country together.
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scrotgrot
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(Original post by Comeback)
Labour-Lib would be ok too. People exaggerate the differences between Labour and the Conservatives. Labour have been moving for decades closer towards the Conservatives.

Ed Miliband's catchphrase is now even: 'we'll reduce the deficit and balance the books'.
The thing is, reducing the deficit and balancing the books is perfectly compatible with higher wages, benefits and spending on public infrastructure.

That's because it is all redistribution to the poorer people in society. These people:
- need the things they buy, so the marginal demand is far greater if you give them more money than if you give it to the rich
- more often use local British non-offshoring non-tax-dodging small businesses
- are better trained, educated, healthier, can move around easier etc if there is good public infrastructure, all of which makes them more valuable and productive employees.

Austerity, cuts and catering to the asset-owning classes have caused the economy to go to pot because what it essentially means is giving all the money to the rich, they avoid tax, hide it offshore, invest it in an asset like housing with government-assured returns, and it all gets sucked out of the real economy at best, or as with housing actively harms it at worst.

Labour are still in the grand scheme of things and historically close to the Conservatives, but they are moving away from them, and the narrowness of the expected victory will mean all decisions need to be passed by socialist backbenchers and maybe anti-austerity SNP if they are part of it.
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Davij038
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Just leave this here:

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/03f1cdd8-e...#axzz3XZXa4wUu

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-32346214
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HigherMinion
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Why is everybody obsessed these days with centrism? It's a weak "third way" forward that pleases nobody. It's just sluggish progressivism. Those who don't want progressivism get annoyed and those that do are annoyed at the pace at which it marches.
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Davij038
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(Original post by HigherMinion)
Why is everybody obsessed these days with centrism? It's a weak "third way" forward that pleases nobody. It's just sluggish progressivism. Those who don't want progressivism get annoyed and those that do are annoyed at the pace at which it marches.
No policy is going to please everyone. Centrism appeals to people who want change but don't want too much risk- this is why Tony Blair was so popular.
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HigherMinion
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(Original post by Davij038)
No policy is going to please everyone. Centrism appeals to people who want change but don't want too much risk- this is why Tony Blair was so popular.
I think Blair started off the new era of slimy politics of "gimme dat" culture in the UK when it came to politics. That's why he was popular- fr33 st00f for everybody!
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Flame Alchemist
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(Original post by zippity.doodah)
you're probably right, only because UKIP won't get enough seats
if they did, however, I'd say they'd be the better option
and labour-lib dem, or labour-snp would be too socialist
Due to UKIP's lack of a majority, a Conservative-UKIP coalition would be interesting to see.

With Lib Dem factored out, they're probably the parties closest to each other. Or at least, a majority of Kippers are Tory defectors and Farage is keen to encourage a Tory majority in preference to a Labour victory.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Lady Comstock)
All other options are too extreme and will affect our economic recovery.

We should stick with the status quo - a centrist government?
While i question the definition of centrism (though it's relative i suppose) i agree. I'd vote for the current coalition were it on the ballot paper. The important thing is to keep the nationalists out of power.

(Original post by a96clark)
Lib dem are currently less supported than the 'other' category in most polls. I don't think they'll have much power to form a coalition
They'll likely still have 30 seats. A Tory-Lib Dem-DUP/UUP arrangement means that the Tories only need 290 probably and that's still possible.
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Davij038
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Thought I'd add that both the FT and The Economist both think that tge coalition should be continued...
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