Help! Writing an A grade essay Watch

Jory
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Hey TSE
I am a failing politics student, Ds and Es across the board :s i need to get a B as the very least!
So im asking for help, i use a laptop for my exams but im wondering how you structure an essay and as im doing one now i was wondering if any previous students have an A grade answer for this question or if anyone had any tips and the points i need to use thanks

Discuss the view that we should use proportional representation to elect members of the Westminster parliament

Futhermore can any of you please check this essay i have just written and can you see what improvements i need to make in order to make it an A grade answer thanks
Spoiler:
Show
Discuss the view that the sovereignty of parliament is the most important underlying principle of the British constitution
Some political commentators would suggest that parliamentary sovereignty is the most important underlying principle of the constitution because all legislation that effects the UK and the constitution is made in parliament by the legislature. Because of this, membership of international bodies such as the EU (as we have to follow EU law) which erodes parliamentary sovereignty can easily be repealed. The European community’s act 1972 was made in Westminster and can be repealed just as easily in Westminster. Furthermore the work of parliament could be seen to erode some of the other principles, such as the rule of law when the terrorism act 2001 was passed. And the devolution act 1999 and 1997 which devolved power from Westminster to Scotland, wales and Northern Ireland has changed Britain from a unitary state to a confederal state. Because of the power over the other principles it is the most important.
On the other hand parliamentary sovereignty has been severely eroded due to devolution and is massively undermined, allowing other principles such as the rule of law to be considered the most important.
However some would argue that the rule of law is more important, as this gives citizens their rights, like the right to a fair and just trial and allows MPs and even the queen to be brought to account for their actions. This was seen fairly recently in 2013 when Chris Hughes a member of the cabinet got 2 years in prison for allowing his wife to take speeding points for him, in addition to this the queen got three points on her license for speeding. This accountability makes the rule of law more important than parliamentary sovereignty.
On the other hand there are still conventions such as parliamentary privilege, which means that MPs and ordinary citizens are still not equal and the rule of law does not give citizens power. Which means that it could be seen as less important than parliamentary sovereignty
Some would argue that constitutional monarchy is the most important principle, as without it, there wouldn’t be any laws as the royal assent is the last stage of the law making process and must be given in order for a law to be passed.
Opponents of this would argue that constitutional monarchy is merely a formality, it can be bypassed in extreme circumstances and the last time it was refused was in 1707 when Queen Anne refused to sign for the Scottish militia bill.
Some would argue that the separation of powers is the most important as it means that no area of power becomes too powerful.
However some would argue that the separation of powers is not important when compared with parliamentary sovereignty as there is no real separation of powers, there is overlap between the legislature and executive with the cabinet and the Lord Chancellor used to overlap all three while currently the chief justice sectary still causes a bit of overlap.
It could be argued that unitary state is the most important, as it allows the sovereignty of the UK to be kept in one place, which makes it easier to bring those elected for the representation of constituencies to be brought to account.
In contrast, the UK can no longer be considered to be a unitary state, as devolution has dispersed the power of Westminster to places like the Scottish parliament and northern Irish and welsh assembles. Which shows how parliamentary so can be considered more important as it can easily repeal the devolution acts making the UK a unitary state again?
0
reply
Shelly8hulahoops
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
Hi, firstly don't call yourself a 'failing student'- believe in yourself!
I know very little about politics, but have skimmed through your essay & a few things jump out.
Firstly, do you not need to use sources & references? Maybe your assignment is different, but we are expected to use loads of high-quality sources & Harvard referencing (not sure if you're at uni though?)
Also maybe a stronger introduction & conclusion? (& signposting, to make it easier for the reader to follow)

Maybe the best thing is to leave it for a day or so if you can, then go back to it & you'll find things jump out at you (not literally!) but maybe things like spelling, using capital letters, paragraphs etc.

Hope this helps a bit, there are loads of study skills books out there, also loads of useful websites.

Most importantly believe in yourself & remember most people struggle at times, even if they don't admit it!
Good luck!!
0
reply
Jory
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by Shelly8hulahoops)
Hi, firstly don't call yourself a 'failing student'- believe in yourself!
I know very little about politics, but have skimmed through your essay & a few things jump out.
Firstly, do you not need to use sources & references? Maybe your assignment is different, but we are expected to use loads of high-quality sources & Harvard referencing (not sure if you're at uni though?)
Also maybe a stronger introduction & conclusion? (& signposting, to make it easier for the reader to follow)

Maybe the best thing is to leave it for a day or so if you can, then go back to it & you'll find things jump out at you (not literally!) but maybe things like spelling, using capital letters, paragraphs etc.

Hope this helps a bit, there are loads of study skills books out there, also loads of useful websites.

Most importantly believe in yourself & remember most people struggle at times, even if they don't admit it!
Good luck!!
As a AS student we are told we do not need an introduction and only need a consluion is a question is asked
0
reply
lisamb
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
It could be improved if there was a more defined structure, as it's quite difficult to follow your discussion. I would maybe think about keeping similar arguments together in paragraphs so at the end when you're concluding it's easier to evaluate. It's also really important to have a conclusion where you tie up the essay: compare, contrast and really use your evaluative skills. There are a lot of essay plans online and guides to help if you need any, first I found on google was this: http://www.library.dmu.ac.uk/Support...x.php?page=482.
You did mention that as an AS student you don't need an introduction but it's good practice, even if it's a couple of sentences outlining your aims for the essay or expanding on the question.

In the essay you posted I picked up on your use of "some political commentators". Who are you referring to? Again, when you say "them" and "others" I'm not sure of exactly who could be saying it. It would really show you've been researching if you can find some sources and use concrete examples in your work; external reading is always shown in A grade answers! I still follow the PEE chain from GCSE and it works; point, evidence, explain.

Hope this helps
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Edge Hill University
    Undergraduate and Postgraduate - Campus Tour Undergraduate
    Mon, 18 Feb '19
  • University of the Arts London
    MA Innovation Management Open Day Postgraduate
    Mon, 18 Feb '19
  • University of Roehampton
    Department of Media, Culture and Language; School of Education; Business School Undergraduate
    Tue, 19 Feb '19

Do you give blood?

Yes (50)
9.52%
I used to but I don't now (14)
2.67%
No, but I want to start (189)
36%
No, I am unable to (122)
23.24%
No, I chose not to (150)
28.57%

Watched Threads

View All