Question for UKIP voters Watch

BasicMistake
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Let's create a hypothetical situation that by some miracle UKIP become the largest party in the UK, they organise an EU referendum, the British people vote to leave the EU and strict immigration controls are put in place.

Okay. Would you still be a UKIP voter after this? I cannot claim to know much about UKIP's policies but a lot of them revolve around the EU and once its all over, what happens then??
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KimKallstrom
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Well Ukip will then be free to implement their economic policies for example. Very free market.

Though I think it's a sad indictment of the state of the debate of politics in this country when an Australian-style immigration system is considered 'strict'. Better than calling them racist for it though.
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Dumachi
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Yes just read them...: http://www.ukip.org/policies_for_people
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)
Well Ukip will then be free to implement their economic policies for example. Very free market.

Though I think it's a sad indictment of the state of the debate of politics in this country when an Australian-style immigration system is considered 'strict'. Better than calling them racist for it though.
The Australian system is strict - what would you consider to be a "strict" system?
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)
Well Ukip will then be free to implement their economic policies for example. Very free market.
In the debate this week - NF stated that an EU referendum was the only priority - in fact he said that if Labour were the larger party in parliament and they agreed to a referendum then UKiP would support them - yet the UKiP economic plans do not seem to match too well with the Labour plans
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King Boo
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At the minute, I think the country needs to have a serious debate about the role the EU plays.

That means none of this pulling the racist card when someone thinks uncontrolled immigration is bad.

We need the truthful figures of how much money goes to the EU, the truthful figures about what laws are made in the EU, and we need to be given the chance as a nation to vote on whether we think its best for our country.


Sadly, labour have completely dismissed this. They think its best for us, so we dont get a say. The hypocrisy is whilst saying that in the next sentence they claim they're against top down economics and politics, and all for the people. Well then Ed, why not give the people a say instead of imposing what you think is best on the rest of us?

In short, I do agree with a lot of UKIPs policies. I dont think we should be giving free healthcare to anyone who immigrates here, they should come with insurance. We cannot police or heal the world, and its about time we started putting British people first.

I also want to be proud of my national identity. Wales has one, Scotlands national identity is currently soaring, but what about Englands? Its almost as if Im not allowed to be proud of the fact I'm english, because someone will find it racist.

I'll probably be voting tory on election day, but I'd like to see UKIP do well.
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BasicMistake
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)
Though I think it's a sad indictment of the state of the debate of politics in this country when an Australian-style immigration system is considered 'strict'. Better than calling them racist for it though.
There are few countries with tougher immigration laws than Australia. Looking at the others, some have strict laws due to having a homogenous view of their own country, i.e. Denmark and Japan. And they actually have been criticised for being racist and going against human rights.
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#Ridwan
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(Original post by BasicMistake)
There are few countries with tougher immigration laws than Australia. Looking at the others, some have strict laws due to having a homogenous view of their own country, i.e. Denmark and Japan. And they actually have been criticised for being racist and going against human rights.

Denmark is a member of the EU and hence its immigration controls cannot possibly be considered strict.
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KimKallstrom
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
In the debate this week - NF stated that an EU referendum was the only priority - in fact he said that if Labour were the larger party in parliament and they agreed to a referendum then UKiP would support them - yet the UKiP economic plans do not seem to match too well with the Labour plans
He was speaking specifically about the subject of a coalition........so that people can then vote to leave the EU.

Ukip aren't about leaving the EU for no reason. It's so that we can have an economy and society that is removed from the EU policies of corporatism protectionism.
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KimKallstrom
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
The Australian system is strict - what would you consider to be a "strict" system?
America is strict. As far as I know Japan is stricter as well.

The point is that Australia's system of letting in people of use to you should be considered the bench mark of sensible. Apparently not.........
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)
He was speaking specifically about the subject of a coalition........so that people can then vote to leave the EU.

Ukip aren't about leaving the EU for no reason. It's so that we can have an economy and society that is removed from the EU policies of corporatism protectionism.
Yet, NF's desire to have a referendum is so keen that he would be willing to give up all of his economic philosophies and support Labour in a coalition
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BasicMistake
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(Original post by #Ridwan)
Denmark is a member of the EU and hence its immigration controls cannot possibly be considered strict.
They are considered to have the strictest immigration laws within the EU; I probably should have said that their laws involve immigrants from outside Europe.
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)
America is strict. As far as I know Japan is stricter as well.

The point is that Australia's system of letting in people of use to you should be considered the bench mark of sensible. Apparently not.........
Some friends of mine applied to move to Australia

Everything was going ahead, they had jobs lined up, house sold stc

The final check revealed that my friend's brother (an Australian citizen) who was sponsoring them had moved house within the last three years - to another house in the same area

This was enough for their application to be cancelled



You may be correct that America and Japan have even stricter but I still dispute the idea that the Australian system is not strict
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BasicMistake
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)
America is strict. As far as I know Japan is stricter as well.

The point is that Australia's system of letting in people of use to you should be considered the bench mark of sensible. Apparently not.........
This is all relative, compared to most countries Australia does have a strict system. And I never said that their system is bad.
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KimKallstrom
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
Yet, NF's desire to have a referendum is so keen that he would be willing to give up all of his economic philosophies and support Labour in a coalition
Because it's the most important point. You can have all the economic/immigration policies in the world but you cannot implement them without leaving the EU. That's his point. He says it every time he is on a panel for anything like QT etc.

I'm guessing it's also because he's confident a referendum would yield an EU exist. Whether this is true or not is anyone's guess but he obviously believes it.
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Dumachi
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http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xsw...-politics_news
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BasicMistake
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Thanks for wasting 5 minutes of my time, how on Earth was that relevant? Or are you trying to put up propaganda on this thread?
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)

I'm guessing it's also because he's confident a referendum would yield an EU exist. Whether this is true or not is anyone's guess but he obviously believes it.
I guess he knows that Labour will not go down the EU referendum route so he is safe making pseudo-offers

I am intrigued by their entire manifesto - it is based not on a referendum but an OUT response - without this there are no alternative funding streams for their economic plans
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ibzombie96
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(Original post by KimKallstrom)
Well Ukip will then be free to implement their economic policies for example. Very free market.

Though I think it's a sad indictment of the state of the debate of politics in this country when an Australian-style immigration system is considered 'strict'. Better than calling them racist for it though.
False.

Despite Farage's assertion that his party is in favour of the rugged individualism of liberal, free market economics, the truth is different. His voters tend to be white working class middle aged people who tend to be much more left-leaning in terms of their view on economics. For that very reason, whilst UKIP may blabber on about the free market, Farage's assault on the 'big businesses' (as he puts it) is the opposite of a free market view. Economically speaking, Labour and UKIP have some very similar views.
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Clip
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(Original post by BasicMistake)
This is all relative, compared to most countries Australia does have a strict system. And I never said that their system is bad.
Mexico and Switzerland are far, far harsher than Australia.
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