English of mice and men, heroes, inspector calls

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kirstylouisew14
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whats a good way to revise for the novellas above and any tips for essays on Nicole Renard Larry Lasalle curleys wife and sheila birling
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hycurrie
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I did those novels/plays in GCSE and got an A, but what worked for me might not work for you. I got york notes and revision guides and read through them and they really helped. I also used bbc bitesize and other websites and basically read through and made notes on what it says. Not only that it might sound really boring but read all the books and play over and over again, maybe watch the movies (but they change the name in the inspector in the movie we watched for some reason) and obviously remember that the movies may change from the books (play). Not only that but talking through it with other people and sharing ideas help, and making mind maps helped me too.

Hope this helps in any way
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zahanara
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I have not studied heroes, but I can give you some essay tips on curley's wife and sheila birling.

Curley's wife:

Intro: The novella of mice an men by Steinbeck, was written at 1930's during the great depression, a time when there was a lot of discrimination, including discrimination against women. Curley's wife is presented as the only women, in the ranch and Steinbeck uses several different ways to explore her character.
-First of all, the fact that she is called Curley's wife is quite significant as it shows that she is treated like Curley's object. This gives a sense of the patriarchal society during that time because she is objectified and treated with very little respect. Steinbeck uses curley's wife to represent the women during that time and shows how they were almost objectified and treated as though they were inferior. This is further emphasised by by candy's despcription of her, who describes her as "a tart" and says that "she got the eye" immediately creating a negative image of her. She is also called several names like "jailbait" "rat-trap" etc to portray the image of a flirtatious women.
-Curley's wife is also used to represent the theme of loneliness. Being the only women in the ranch, she does not have much company, apart from Curley, but she "don't even like Curley", but "he ain't a nice fella" he does not even pay much attention to her. The men in the ranch also do not like to communicate with her as they are afraid of Curley, and the prejudice towards her has caused her to be very lonely. Curley's wife is a victim of loneliness- and the results of loneliness has caused her to express it in a vulnerable way, that make the men in the ranch view her in a negative light. She is described to be "heavily made up", and this is perhaps because she craves attention from someone, which she does not seem to get at all, making the readers sympathise for her.
However the readers do not always feel sorry for her because of the way she treats Crooks when she has the opportunity to because she behaves rudely towards him when she is in his room and say "I could get you strung up in a tree so easy it ain't even funny", which shows that she has authority over him. This could be a result of prejudice, because crooks is clearly in a weaker position than her, being black, so she takes advantage of this power.
-Similar to the other characters in the novella, Curley's wife also has a dream. Before her death she shares her dreams with lennie, about wanting to be in the "pitchers". She explains that she met a guy who would have helped her accomplish it but he never wrote back. She reckons that her "old lady stole it", which shows that she believes that the dream could have been possible so she clung on to the dream. The impossibility of the dream meant little to her which is showed when she says "I coulda made something of myself... maybe I will yet". She desperately wanted to be someone special, which during that time would have been something a lot of women wanted, perhaps to escape the prejudice and live a life where they felt more appreciated.
Steinbeck portrays Curley's wife's innocence after her death, when she "lay with a half covering of yellow hay. The meaness and the planning and the discontent and the ache for attention were all gone from her face. She was very pretty and simple, her face was sweet and young." This last description of Curley's wife creates a vivid image of her, which evokes sympathy within the reader's. Despite her harsh behaviour towards Crooks, her desperate craving for attention, she is a beautiful innocent young girl and she deserved a better fate.


Okay wow that took longer than expected... gotta revise more. Okay so cbf to write so much about Sheila now so I'll just summarise.

-Sheila is described at the beginning of the play as a "pretty girl in her twenties, very pleased with life and rather excited"- shows that she has probably never had to face hardships in life as she was born into a wealthy family and has always been protected. But still shows compassion towrds the working class and is shocked at her father's treatment of Eva "But these workers aren't cheap labour-they're people"
-she is perceptive, doubts Gerald when he says he was "busy at works"
-Changes throughout the course of the play: Initially described as jealous and spoilt- when she gets Eva fired from her second job at Milwards "I told them if they didn't get rid of her I'd never go near the place again and I'd persuade mother to close our account with them"
-But hen genuinely feels guilty lets out a "half-stifled sob" also shown through the stage direction "miserable"- reflects on her actions.
-Learns her lesson, is more "impressionable"- represents the younger generation: looks at her parents in a different way since they are "dodging and pretending", which she says "frightens her"

*just note that the quotes may not be 100% accurate as they are from what I remember, and I did not double-check before writing them, so yeah
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kirstylouisew14
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(Original post by hycurrie)
I did those novels/plays in GCSE and got an A, but what worked for me might not work for you. I got york notes and revision guides and read through them and they really helped. I also used bbc bitesize and other websites and basically read through and made notes on what it says. Not only that it might sound really boring but read all the books and play over and over again, maybe watch the movies (but they change the name in the inspector in the movie we watched for some reason) and obviously remember that the movies may change from the books (play). Not only that but talking through it with other people and sharing ideas help, and making mind maps helped me too.

Hope this helps in any way
thank you I did that and got an A in the exam so thank you a lot !!!!!
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kirstylouisew14
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(Original post by zahanara)
I have not studied heroes, but I can give you some essay tips on curley's wife and sheila birling.

Curley's wife:

Intro: The novella of mice an men by Steinbeck, was written at 1930's during the great depression, a time when there was a lot of discrimination, including discrimination against women. Curley's wife is presented as the only women, in the ranch and Steinbeck uses several different ways to explore her character.
-First of all, the fact that she is called Curley's wife is quite significant as it shows that she is treated like Curley's object. This gives a sense of the patriarchal society during that time because she is objectified and treated with very little respect. Steinbeck uses curley's wife to represent the women during that time and shows how they were almost objectified and treated as though they were inferior. This is further emphasised by by candy's despcription of her, who describes her as "a tart" and says that "she got the eye" immediately creating a negative image of her. She is also called several names like "jailbait" "rat-trap" etc to portray the image of a flirtatious women.
-Curley's wife is also used to represent the theme of loneliness. Being the only women in the ranch, she does not have much company, apart from Curley, but she "don't even like Curley", but "he ain't a nice fella" he does not even pay much attention to her. The men in the ranch also do not like to communicate with her as they are afraid of Curley, and the prejudice towards her has caused her to be very lonely. Curley's wife is a victim of loneliness- and the results of loneliness has caused her to express it in a vulnerable way, that make the men in the ranch view her in a negative light. She is described to be "heavily made up", and this is perhaps because she craves attention from someone, which she does not seem to get at all, making the readers sympathise for her.
However the readers do not always feel sorry for her because of the way she treats Crooks when she has the opportunity to because she behaves rudely towards him when she is in his room and say "I could get you strung up in a tree so easy it ain't even funny", which shows that she has authority over him. This could be a result of prejudice, because crooks is clearly in a weaker position than her, being black, so she takes advantage of this power.
-Similar to the other characters in the novella, Curley's wife also has a dream. Before her death she shares her dreams with lennie, about wanting to be in the "pitchers". She explains that she met a guy who would have helped her accomplish it but he never wrote back. She reckons that her "old lady stole it", which shows that she believes that the dream could have been possible so she clung on to the dream. The impossibility of the dream meant little to her which is showed when she says "I coulda made something of myself... maybe I will yet". She desperately wanted to be someone special, which during that time would have been something a lot of women wanted, perhaps to escape the prejudice and live a life where they felt more appreciated.
Steinbeck portrays Curley's wife's innocence after her death, when she "lay with a half covering of yellow hay. The meaness and the planning and the discontent and the ache for attention were all gone from her face. She was very pretty and simple, her face was sweet and young." This last description of Curley's wife creates a vivid image of her, which evokes sympathy within the reader's. Despite her harsh behaviour towards Crooks, her desperate craving for attention, she is a beautiful innocent young girl and she deserved a better fate.


Okay wow that took longer than expected... gotta revise more. Okay so cbf to write so much about Sheila now so I'll just summarise.

-Sheila is described at the beginning of the play as a "pretty girl in her twenties, very pleased with life and rather excited"- shows that she has probably never had to face hardships in life as she was born into a wealthy family and has always been protected. But still shows compassion towrds the working class and is shocked at her father's treatment of Eva "But these workers aren't cheap labour-they're people"
-she is perceptive, doubts Gerald when he says he was "busy at works"
-Changes throughout the course of the play: Initially described as jealous and spoilt- when she gets Eva fired from her second job at Milwards "I told them if they didn't get rid of her I'd never go near the place again and I'd persuade mother to close our account with them"
-But hen genuinely feels guilty lets out a "half-stifled sob" also shown through the stage direction "miserable"- reflects on her actions.
-Learns her lesson, is more "impressionable"- represents the younger generation: looks at her parents in a different way since they are "dodging and pretending", which she says "frightens her"

*just note that the quotes may not be 100% accurate as they are from what I remember, and I did not double-check before writing them, so yeah
thank you so much I found that really helpful and have passed onto to year 11 friends !!!
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hycurrie
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(Original post by kirstylouisew14)
thank you I did that and got an A in the exam so thank you a lot !!!!!
You're welcome
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kirstylouisew14
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(Original post by hycurrie)
You're welcome
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