Sam1B
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hey guys, quick question!
Why does doubling the amount of catalyst not necessarily double the rate of reaction? What limiting factors affect this? Please be specific! ~Thanks
0
reply
Sam1B
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#2
Anyone?
0
reply
fluzzles98
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
I don't know exactly, but I would say that it has something to do with the fact that catalysts only reduce the activation energy needed for the reaction to occur. Therefore, doubling the amount of catalyst won't necessarily double the rate of reaction as the activation energy has already been lowered by the catalyst present (which doesn't get used up, either)
I hope that makes sense haha


Posted from TSR Mobile
1
reply
mattcandy3
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
The catalyst ''effectively dobules the rate of reaction'' However this is BS, the catalyst lowers the activation energy of the reaction , it doesnt double the reaction rate , doubling the catalyst will not have any effect on the rate, the only things that have effect on the rate, are temperature, concentration etc..
1
reply
Sam1B
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
Makes sense, thank you guys!
0
reply
chichimayam
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
You can say that a catalyst INCREASES the reaction rate because it lowers the activation energy of the reaction by offering an alternative pathway.
0
reply
Pigster
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
For a heterogeneous solid catalyst, doubling the surface area of the catalyst could double the reaction rate. Having twice the mass, i.e. doubling the catalyst would not necessarily double the rate, unless it also lead to a doubling of S.A.

If you catalyst is homogeneous, then (depending on the rate equation) it would double the rate if you doubled the conc. of catalyst.
0
reply
Sam1B
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#8
YES! Okay, why would having twice the mass not double the rate? That is what I meant!
0
reply
charco
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by Sam1B)
YES! Okay, why would having twice the mass not double the rate? That is what I meant!
Reactions occur at the surface of a heterogeneous catalyst. Not all of the mass is in contact with the reactants
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (287)
55.73%
I don't have everything I need (228)
44.27%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise