timtu
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi, I'm currently doing Spanish AS level. It's my weakest subject so I will most probably drop it next year, but I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips on what would be a useful way to revise effectively for my exam in four weeks in order to achieve a respectable grade? Any comments would be appreciated hugely.
0
reply
Puddles the Monkey
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by timtu)
Hi, I'm currently doing Spanish AS level. It's my weakest subject so I will most probably drop it next year, but I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips on what would be a useful way to revise effectively for my exam in four weeks in order to achieve a respectable grade? Any comments would be appreciated hugely.
Heya, I'm going to put this in the languages forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you! http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=98
0
reply
kittycannon
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by timtu)
Hi, I'm currently doing Spanish AS level. It's my weakest subject so I will most probably drop it next year, but I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips on what would be a useful way to revise effectively for my exam in four weeks in order to achieve a respectable grade? Any comments would be appreciated hugely.
Although I'm currently doing French and Spanish AS (and getting As) this might not be as helpful as someone doing A2. I'd say, to begin with, rule out your weaknesses, whether it be reading, listening, writing, grammar or speaking, and concentrate on those.

If you're doing Edexcel, like me, there are certain questions which are harder than others - namely Q4 and Q7, which are overly pedantic and harsh in the mark scheme. So, it might be an idea to concentrate on certain types of questions that you find difficult. And do past papers in general, too.

I personally haven't done the speaking exam yet (mine's on the 7th ) but what really helps is practicing. I'm not sure about your situation, but in my sixth form, we have speaking lessons every week, which are essentially a mock exam with a previously used stimulus. If you don't have that, don't worry about looking weird talking to yourself in your room. Just speaking makes it feel so much more natural when it comes to the real thing, by making your mouth get used to making the different shapes and sounds.

If your writing is a concern, and your teacher doesn't mind, try writing essays for them and ask them to go through them with you, or posting them in the forums asking people to make/explain corrections.

Also, learning certain filler phrases such as 'que yo sepa', 'pues', 'bueno', 'de hecho' and 'o sea', makes it feel more natural and less awkward if you have a pause/need a few seconds to think of an idea. And another thing - if you go completely blank, ask your teacher/the examiner to repeat the question even if you understood it, to buy yourself some time!

Although I usually wouldn't recommend that you learn vocabulary in the same way that you learn facts, you might want to do that. It doesn't really work for me, but if your vocabulary is an issue, learn some of the basic words they use in your unit. It might also be an idea to learn some fancy essay phrases to bump up your marks for writing. Again, if you're doing Edexcel (not sure about the others), sometimes they make you write a letter. Even if you write like a native but don't use the correct format (formal/informal letter, article etc), you can instantly lose a grade. So definitely learn how to greet/sign off a letter. If you like learning vocabulary sort of how you learn facts, by repeating it over and over, try sites like memrise.com (free.. and it's good for other subjects) vocabexpress.com (extremely annoying but helpful I guess. Might need an account through the school) and quizlet.com (again, might need an account through the school)

As for reading and listening, all that can really help is... doing it. The more you are exposed to the language (and take it in), the more you understand. It helps with vocabulary too. With the Edexcel textbooks at least, we're given CDs with listening exercises on them. They are a bit easier, from my experience, than the actual exam and textbook exercises, but it's better than nothing. If you don't have that, and prefer doing the past paper listening questions, do those.

I'd highly recommend that you identify certain tenses or parts of the grammar which you don't understand, so you can either look it up on the internet for an explanation, ask your teacher, or ask for help in the forums.

This is so much longer than I intended it to be, but basically, identify what you're not so good at... go over it... then practice, and practice some more! I can't really stress enough how practicing and learning from your mistakes are the most important things when it comes to Spanish, as it's not really something that can be crammed the night before.

¡Suerte!
2
reply
timtu
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by kittycannon)
Although I'm currently doing French and Spanish AS (and getting As) this might not be as helpful as someone doing A2. I'd say, to begin with, rule out your weaknesses, whether it be reading, listening, writing, grammar or speaking, and concentrate on those.

If you're doing Edexcel, like me, there are certain questions which are harder than others - namely Q4 and Q7, which are overly pedantic and harsh in the mark scheme. So, it might be an idea to concentrate on certain types of questions that you find difficult. And do past papers in general, too.

I personally haven't done the speaking exam yet (mine's on the 7th ) but what really helps is practicing. I'm not sure about your situation, but in my sixth form, we have speaking lessons every week, which are essentially a mock exam with a previously used stimulus. If you don't have that, don't worry about looking weird talking to yourself in your room. Just speaking makes it feel so much more natural when it comes to the real thing, by making your mouth get used to making the different shapes and sounds.

If your writing is a concern, and your teacher doesn't mind, try writing essays for them and ask them to go through them with you, or posting them in the forums asking people to make/explain corrections.

Also, learning certain filler phrases such as 'que yo sepa', 'pues', 'bueno', 'de hecho' and 'o sea', makes it feel more natural and less awkward if you have a pause/need a few seconds to think of an idea. And another thing - if you go completely blank, ask your teacher/the examiner to repeat the question even if you understood it, to buy yourself some time!

Although I usually wouldn't recommend that you learn vocabulary in the same way that you learn facts, you might want to do that. It doesn't really work for me, but if your vocabulary is an issue, learn some of the basic words they use in your unit. It might also be an idea to learn some fancy essay phrases to bump up your marks for writing. Again, if you're doing Edexcel (not sure about the others), sometimes they make you write a letter. Even if you write like a native but don't use the correct format (formal/informal letter, article etc), you can instantly lose a grade. So definitely learn how to greet/sign off a letter. If you like learning vocabulary sort of how you learn facts, by repeating it over and over, try sites like memrise.com (free.. and it's good for other subjects) vocabexpress.com (extremely annoying but helpful I guess. Might need an account through the school) and quizlet.com (again, might need an account through the school)

As for reading and listening, all that can really help is... doing it. The more you are exposed to the language (and take it in), the more you understand. It helps with vocabulary too. With the Edexcel textbooks at least, we're given CDs with listening exercises on them. They are a bit easier, from my experience, than the actual exam and textbook exercises, but it's better than nothing. If you don't have that, and prefer doing the past paper listening questions, do those.

I'd highly recommend that you identify certain tenses or parts of the grammar which you don't understand, so you can either look it up on the internet for an explanation, ask your teacher, or ask for help in the forums.

This is so much longer than I intended it to be, but basically, identify what you're not so good at... go over it... then practice, and practice some more! I can't really stress enough how practicing and learning from your mistakes are the most important things when it comes to Spanish, as it's not really something that can be crammed the night before.

¡Suerte!
Thank you a huge amount. Best of luck for your exams also.
0
reply
timtu
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
Heya, I'm going to put this in the languages forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you! http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=98
Thanks!
0
reply
JTBullen
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by timtu)
Hi, I'm currently doing Spanish AS level. It's my weakest subject so I will most probably drop it next year, but I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips on what would be a useful way to revise effectively for my exam in four weeks in order to achieve a respectable grade? Any comments would be appreciated hugely.

Hi! I'm doing A2 Spanish!

People seem to think that you can't revise for languages! You can! I did French and Spanish AS last year and continued Spanish while dropping French.

It's simple:

Reading - vocab and grammar, exam technique is also a big part of this! Do a lot of past readings to get used to what they want, you want to have done all past papers available to you before the exam! Look at the tense of verbs in the question, usually you answer in the same tense they ask the question.

Listening - Vocab, talk to fluent people! In spanish, words ending and starting in a vowel often get put as one sound so get used to this example: este es así - this is so... (although don't get too hung up on listening as it is usually the least amount of marks)

Writing - Practice writing using correct structure and good phrases over and over again (I have a load of these, if you want them message me) MAKE SURE YOU INTRODUCE AND CONCLUDE!

Translation - Vocab and grammar, the grammar is really important here, check what tense things are in

Hope this helps!
James
0
reply
timtu
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by JTBullen)
Hi! I'm doing A2 Spanish!

People seem to think that you can't revise for languages! You can! I did French and Spanish AS last year and continued Spanish while dropping French.

It's simple:

Reading - vocab and grammar, exam technique is also a big part of this! Do a lot of past readings to get used to what they want, you want to have done all past papers available to you before the exam! Look at the tense of verbs in the question, usually you answer in the same tense they ask the question.

Listening - Vocab, talk to fluent people! In spanish, words ending and starting in a vowel often get put as one sound so get used to this example: este es así - this is so... (although don't get too hung up on listening as it is usually the least amount of marks)

Writing - Practice writing using correct structure and good phrases over and over again (I have a load of these, if you want them message me) MAKE SURE YOU INTRODUCE AND CONCLUDE!

Translation - Vocab and grammar, the grammar is really important here, check what tense things are in

Hope this helps!
James
Thank you huge amounts!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Hertfordshire
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Feb '20
  • Ravensbourne University London
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Feb '20
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Get into Teaching in South Yorkshire Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (368)
67.15%
No (180)
32.85%

Watched Threads

View All