WhiteCape
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
As somebody who's applying to uni this year my chances of going straight into medicine are looking lower and lower. My GCSE's were the main inhibiting factor and I haven't been able to do as much volunteering etc as I would have liked to. With this in mind I'm thinking of doing a biomed degree first (which I'm in no way saying 'Oh Biomed is **** so I'll do that first' I really respect it and from what I've looked at it's very interesting, and yes I understand it's still hard to get on the course but things like GCSE's aren't worth so much) and then going in as a postgrad to medicine. Can anyone just confirm that A. This is a good way of doing it, as my heart is set on being a doctor and B. Can somebody please tell me the things they look for in biomedicine other than exam results, IE Any equivalent medical tests, reading, volunteering etc. Thanks guys
0
reply
eahrc94
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
Hey, I'm in the same boat. I didn't do as well as I'd have liked to with my A-levels and so couldn't apply directly to medicine. I took a year out, did some travelling and health work and then applied to do biomed. I'm now going into my 2nd year and I don't regret anything. I'm still heart set on becoming a doctor and plan to do the graduate route. I've been told by many that the graduate route is a lot more competitive - which it is. There are hundreds more applicants for fewer spaces, plus you're up against people with more experience and better qualifications etc, so you really have to stand out. But if you're determined enough and work hard, I think it's possible.

In terms of actually getting into medicine. You'll need to take the ukcat test (some unis will ask for a bmat test too) and I think the average score is around the 600 mark for ukcat. It's a cognitive ability test with different sections like abstract reasoning. numerical reasoning. There are loads of websites and books that can help you prepare.
Experience wise, it's quite hard to get. But! If you can get a placement somewhere shadowing doctors on different clinics or wards and take notes etc it looks great.
Also! Lots of people I know who managed to get into medicine did research projects in their own time and managed to get published in scientific/medical journals. So maybe look into that? Make sure you can say you're staying informed about all the new advances the industry is working on -if you don't already, read science magazines/journals it's the easiest way!
0
reply
Ezme39
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
It's worth considering that a few biomed courses offer a transfer to medicine for their top students, after the first year but they are insanely competitive as the places are so limited!
Equally, there are courses other than biomed which allow you to do graduate entry medicine (neuroscience, pharmacology)- so make sure you choose the course that you would be happiest on, especially if medicine doesn't work out
0
reply
eahrc94
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
[QUOTE=eahrc94;58545385]Hey, I'm in the same boat. I didn't do as well as I'd have liked to with my A-levels and so couldn't apply directly to medicine. I took a year out, did some travelling and health work and then applied to do biomed. I'm now going into my 2nd year and I don't regret anything. I'm still heart set on becoming a doctor and plan to do the graduate route. I've been told by many that the graduate route is a lot more competitive - which it is. There are hundreds more applicants for fewer spaces, plus you're up against people with more experience and better qualifications etc, so you really have to stand out. But if you're determined enough and work hard, I think it's possible.

In terms of actually getting into medicine. You'll need to take the ukcat test (some unis will ask for a bmat test too) and I think the average score is around the 600 mark for ukcat. It's a cognitive ability test with different sections like abstract reasoning. numerical reasoning. There are loads of websites and books that can help you prepare.
Experience wise, it's quite hard to get. But! If you can get a placement somewhere shadowing doctors on different clinics or wards and take notes etc it looks great.
Also! Lots of people I know who managed to get into medicine did research projects in their own time and managed to get published in scientific/medical journals. So maybe look into that? Make sure you can say you're staying informed about all the new advances the industry is working on -if you don't already, read science magazines/journals it's the easiest way!
0
reply
troubadour.
Badges: 19
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
Apart from the competition, the other major con of the graduate entry is that you probably won't be able to get a government loan (the friendly, you-don't-pay-anything-until-you-have-a-well-paying-job kind) for the medical degree once you get onto it as it's only for first degrees, which would be your biomedical sciences degree. Other than that, fire away.
0
reply
Samsw
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
Hello, i had a similar problem. Ive alwaya wanted to be a doctor but was not provided with clear educational paths so didnt take up chemistry at a level and therefore was unable to apply medicine depite it being the only thing i want to and have ever wanted to do. I applied for a medical science degree at south wales uni as its in a feeder scheme to graduate entry medicine at cardiff (my first choice med school) which increases chance of successful application to GEM. I met my offer for south wales so will be starting in a few weeks. I am well willing to work insanely hard to get into GEM so with the right mindset you can too 😊 in my personal statement i mentioned medical diseases close to me, my passion, my a levels contribution and how i am currently enrolled in a medical experiment in america to detect diabetes before it activates in your genes using protein coding on the blood. In other words, find something that makes you stand out (as everyone says) its not as hard as you think to do something a bit different

Bare in mind your first year of GEM you only get 3500 towards tutition fees so you will need to work through your first degree (3 years) and save around 10,000 pounds for the rest of tutition, accommodation and food. But dont worry from year 2 GEM, you will recieve full tutition fee loan, maintenance grant, NHS grant and maybe bursary
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (139)
42.51%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (38)
11.62%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (27)
8.26%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (70)
21.41%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (34)
10.4%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (19)
5.81%

Watched Threads

View All