TammyChong
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To calculate the charge, we use Q=It. But from the diagram how do I know the value of the current pass through a given point?
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by TammyChong)
To calculate the charge, we use Q=It. But from the diagram how do I know the value of the current pass through a given point?
Heya, I'm going to put this in the physics forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you!

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=372
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samb1234
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(Original post by TammyChong)
To calculate the charge, we use Q=It. But from the diagram how do I know the value of the current pass through a given point?
Is it d or have I made a mistake?

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Aph
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(Original post by TammyChong)
To calculate the charge, we use Q=It. But from the diagram how do I know the value of the current pass through a given point?
Well you have 2 branches all you need to do is use kirckhoff 1 to make the currents add.
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Walex12108
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whats the answer? you can work back from there to find current for the purpose of understanding how to get it.
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Xetter
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I would have said D too, 3A enter, 1A heads down one branch whilst the other 2A head towards R.

So the calculation using Q=IT would be Q=2×5 remembering I is measured in amps and T is measured in seconds.

2×5 = 10. Q=10. Answer is D!

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Walex12108
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Am I reading this wrong but Im looking at as if 1A is approaching a junction and then splits - except 3A spontaneously appears from nowhere.

Ohh wait I think we assume that The 3A is the current when the junctions come to a point, so the arrow on R would be pointing left and upwards. so the R + 1A = 3A therefore R = 2A

Does this make sense ?
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Xetter
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(Original post by Walex12108)
Am I reading this wrong but Im looking at as if 1A is approaching a junction and then splits - except 3A spontaneously appears from nowhere.

Ohh wait I think we assume that The 3A is the current when the junctions come to a point, so the arrow on R would be pointing left and upwards. so the R + 1A = 3A therefore R = 2A

Does this make sense ?
The second paragraph is exactly it! 1+2=3! Arrow pointing NW

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