The Student Room Group
De Montfort University
De Montfort University
Leicester
Visit website

Do NOT attend if you're planning to do accountancy/finance

Hi,
I've been quite a quiet person on here, and haven't even bothered to create an account up until now, but I just wanted to give a friendly warning to all those planning to attend demontfort for accountancy or finance, seriously, if someone had told me this, I would not have gone.
I'm going to give an honest review of my experience, along with various other student's opinions from my course, and I'll lay it out so that I review each bits of it from the course.

I know it's a little lengthy, but please do read all of it as it may save you £27,000 in tuition fees. Make your decision very carefully.

Freshers

Right, I thought I'd start with the somewhat positive elements of the course. Freshers is ok, you meet people, and there are lots of events on. BUT, bare in mind this is very much like school; the older generation don't want to particularly speak to the youngers, and it's almost impossible to find people who do accountancy and finance at freshers. Why? Because the vast majority are international and arrive late/don't care for freshers and/or they're travelling from home/Birmingham and already have their social cliques.

Social Experience

As I said, you'll be woefully disappointed by course friends; vast majority stick amongst their own. Beyond that, if you want to find friends to travel with or go couchsurfing for example (like most university experiences) or do something more than clubbing (which trust me, after a year or so, you'll want to because the clubs are shocking) you'll have to pray you have gotten decent flatmates in your student accommodation, because as I said many people already have friends or tend to stick to their own social circles.

Your ACFI friends will always remain superficial, and will never actually turn into true friends. The best way I can describe ACFI friends is this; they treat each other like they're at Oxford university or competing for a £500k salary. Furthermore, if for example you're not planning to do ACCA and want to do CIMA/finance/or even run your own business, you'll be shunned and even the witches of Salem would somewhat feel sorry for you.

The chinese stick with the chinese, the browns stick with the browns, and the 1% of people that are inter-cultural? Well they mostly stick with their flatmates and/or local friends because they know better. Lets just put it this way, if you try and speak to the vast majority about political events or philosophical rhetoric, you'll get an empty gaze and somehow, the conversation will go back to ACCA. It's essentially like speaking to unbranded robots all holding the same piece of paper. No culture, no personality.

Lecturers

So this is where the juicy parts begin. Lecturers are at best; terrible. Seriously, this isn't just a biased experience, I have spoken to many others and spoken to other lecturers at other universities and were shocked by how lecturers treated students in this course. Most of them don't really care; they just want their salary. To add to that, they're teaching crap that isn't applicable to the modern world and expect you to regurgitate the same drivel for their assignments. Any signs of creativity, and you'll be shunned. I won't go into the modules itself as I've got a different section for that, but the lecturers are bad. I for example, have shown many of my assignments to other lecturers throughout different universities in UK, and they have said I've been marked down harshly.

Beyond that, I actually spoke to a friend who went to UCL who got only 50% in one of his assignments. Went to go speak to the lecturer, and lecturer saw he understood better and pushed his grade up to 68%. At DMU, you'll get shouted at and possibly even marked down for questioning their holiness. It's like they've all come to DMU to give up.

There are some lecturers that are decent, but their hands are tied and even say in their lectures "Oh but this model isn't applicable in the real world" - why examine us on it?:angry:

Most ACFI lecturers need to be sent to other universities and given shadow training to see how students should be dealt with. Not to mention their questionable "moderation", you will notice assignments where the lecturer says you haven't said a point, but you had done, and he clearly hasn't bothered to read the assignment in full. As I said, the core of the problem begins with lecturer culture; you know how you read in the news that lecturer and student discovered something? That won't happen here. It's like an elderly home; they've been sent to DMU because no one else wanted them or couldn't handle them.

More to the point, it seems many of them have no understanding of the real world. I've been working in the real world whilst at university and some of the drivel the lecturers say even got my clients laughing. It's all very bureaucratic, and I really don't think they deserve the salaries they're getting. Most lecturers contradict themselves constantly, and then argue with you for outsmarting them.

Modules

Right so the modules themselves. I think it's good if we were still living in 1999 and you're only planning to do ACCA. The modules certainly do not "broaden your horizons".

The first problem is there's no optional IT module for ACFI students. I know you must be thinking but I know how to use all that, which is great, but what about accountancy-software and advanced excel? Again, if you're like me and are pretty good with computers, you can probably answer that with your head held up high, but almost all accountancy/finance related employers chuck you in the deep-end with some accountancy software or at the very least advanced spreadsheets. I'm not aware if this is a problem in other universities as well, but this definitely should be an optional module. 99% of office work is done on a computer, and they should've complimented the modules with an IT module, would've been boring for some of us, but at least it showed they cared + I'm not exactly proficient with SAGE, they should've taught you it.

Moreover, I think the other problem is the content; it seems like it hasn't been updated for years and is the same rubbish just with different years stamped on it. Finance and accountancy are both changing constantly (much to most people's beliefs) but that just doesn't come out of the course.

Again its almost like they've given up even though this is their most profitable/best course. If for example you try and implement modern-day creativity to the problem presented in an assignment, the lecturer will not appreciate and say refer back to module syllabus. I've done dozens of business plans before attending university, and whilst attending university, never had a single criticism from investors nor clients. But it seems when I did the same for a particular module in this course, it was given a somewhat disappointing result. The reasoning was because they just wanted theory, which ofcourse doesn't work in the real world. In fact investors would kick you on your backside if you talked theory to them.

It's difficult for me to describe in words what the problem is with the modules in a nutshell, but I would say it leads back to the culture within the lecturers. No one seems to connect when preparing the modules. This is especially apparent with modules where its' sectioned and run by different lecturers - it seems they never really talk to eachother and instead just do their part. If we were to do that for an assignment, a lecturer would critique it immediately and say the "style isn't the same" but why is it a different rule for them ? Surely they're not hypocrites, **SHOCK HORROR** :eek:

The bottom line here is that there'll be huge gaps in your knowledge with regards to accountancy and finance. I would go as far as saying most of the stuff you'll learn isn't really going to be helpful for you in the real world. I know I know, you don't want a course that's too difficult, but I wish I could describe to you in words what I mean by my above statement. It's like they're teaching you 1+1 must always equal 2, any decent mathematician ofcourse can argue that, and its this argument that's lacking from this course - you're not shown different ways of thinking. It's all too theoretical.


The City/External Factors



I think its wrong of me to comment on this considering I'm referring to the ACFI course itself, so I won't.


Conclusion

I would really suggest you go for an apprenticeship in accountancy if you just want to do ACCA and your only uni choice is DMU. Or if you're like me and want to make something of yourself via finance or a business and you're sociable, choose another university. The culture is disheartening, especially if you're coming to university for the overall experience and I'd never have even considered DMU ACFI if I had to pay £9000/year - you'll never see a return on that. I tried to give an impartial view of the course, and have not specifically written about how they treated me - it may scare you from university entirely if I did! I will say this though; if you're like me who's quite open-minded and not a robot, this course will not be for you. The lecturers really couldn't care less and the course-mates are more like course-dogs.

If you have any questions related to accountancy and finance for DMU, feel free to message me. Don't bother reading the reviews on the internet for DMU, it really doesn't apply to ACFI. I haven't seen anyone bothering to write on the net about their ACFI experience (which just goes to show how crap this course is) so I thought I'd offer you guys some advice.
(edited 9 years ago)
Original post by kasher93
Hi,
I've been quite a quiet person on here, and haven't even bothered to create an account up until now, but I just wanted to give a friendly warning to all those planning to attend demontfort for accountancy or finance, seriously, if someone had told me this, I would not have gone.
I'm going to give an honest review of my experience, along with various other student's opinions from my course, and I'll lay it out so that I review each bits of it from the course.

I know it's a little lengthy, but please do read all of it as it may save you £27,000 in tuition fees. Make your decision very carefully.

Freshers

Right, I thought I'd start with the somewhat positive elements of the course. Freshers is ok, you meet people, and there are lots of events on. BUT, bare in mind this is very much like school; the older generation don't want to particularly speak to the youngers, and it's almost impossible to find people who do accountancy and finance at freshers. Why? Because the vast majority are international and arrive late/don't care for freshers and/or they're travelling from home/Birmingham and already have their social cliques.

Social Experience

As I said, you'll be woefully disappointed by course friends; vast majority stick amongst their own. Beyond that, if you want to find friends to travel with or go couchsurfing for example (like most university experiences) or do something more than clubbing (which trust me, after a year or so, you'll want to because the clubs are shocking) you'll have to pray you have gotten decent flatmates in your student accommodation, because as I said many people already have friends or tend to stick to their own social circles.

Your ACFI friends will always remain superficial, and will never actually turn into true friends. The best way I can describe ACFI friends is this; they treat each other like they're at Oxford university or competing for a £500k salary. Furthermore, if for example you're not planning to do ACCA and want to do CIMA/finance/or even run your own business, you'll be shunned and even the witches of Salem would somewhat feel sorry for you.

The chinese stick with the chinese, the browns stick with the browns, and the 1% of people that are inter-cultural? Well they mostly stick with their flatmates and/or local friends because they know better. Lets just put it this way, if you try and speak to the vast majority about political events or philosophical rhetoric, you'll get an empty gaze and somehow, the conversation will go back to ACCA. It's essentially like speaking to unbranded robots all holding the same piece of paper. No culture, no personality.

Lecturers

So this is where the juicy parts begin. Lecturers are at best; terrible. Seriously, this isn't just a biased experience, I have spoken to many others and spoken to other lecturers at other universities and were shocked by how lecturers treated students in this course. Most of them don't really care; they just want their salary. To add to that, they're teaching crap that isn't applicable to the modern world and expect you to regurgitate the same drivel for their assignments. Any signs of creativity, and you'll be shunned. I won't go into the modules itself as I've got a different section for that, but the lecturers are bad. I for example, have shown many of my assignments to other lecturers throughout different universities in UK, and they have said I've been marked down harshly.

Beyond that, I actually spoke to a friend who went to UCL who got only 50% in one of his assignments. Went to go speak to the lecturer, and lecturer saw he understood better and pushed his grade up to 68%. At DMU, you'll get shouted at and possibly even marked down for questioning their holiness. It's like they've all come to DMU to give up.

There are some lecturers that are decent, but their hands are tied and even say in their lectures "Oh but this model isn't applicable in the real world" - why examine us on it?:angry:

Most ACFI lecturers need to be sent to other universities and given shadow training to see how students should be dealt with. Not to mention their questionable "moderation", you will notice assignments where the lecturer says you haven't said a point, but you had done, and he clearly hasn't bothered to read the assignment in full. As I said, the core of the problem begins with lecturer culture; you know how you read in the news that lecturer and student discovered something? That won't happen here. It's like an elderly home; they've been sent to DMU because no one else wanted them or couldn't handle them.

More to the point, it seems many of them have no understanding of the real world. I've been working in the real world whilst at university and some of the drivel the lecturers say even got my clients laughing. It's all very bureaucratic, and I really don't think they deserve the salaries they're getting. Most lecturers contradict themselves constantly, and then argue with you for outsmarting them.

Modules

Right so the modules themselves. I think it's good if we were still living in 1999 and you're only planning to do ACCA. The modules certainly do not "broaden your horizons".

The first problem is there's no optional IT module for ACFI students. I know you must be thinking but I know how to use all that, which is great, but what about accountancy-software and advanced excel? Again, if you're like me and are pretty good with computers, you can probably answer that with your head held up high, but almost all accountancy/finance related employers chuck you in the deep-end with some accountancy software or at the very least advanced spreadsheets. I'm not aware if this is a problem in other universities as well, but this definitely should be an optional module. 99% of office work is done on a computer, and they should've complimented the modules with an IT module, would've been boring for some of us, but at least it showed they cared + I'm not exactly proficient with SAGE, they should've taught you it.

Moreover, I think the other problem is the content; it seems like it hasn't been updated for years and is the same rubbish just with different years stamped on it. Finance and accountancy are both changing constantly (much to most people's beliefs) but that just doesn't come out of the course.

Again its almost like they've given up even though this is their most profitable/best course. If for example you try and implement modern-day creativity to the problem presented in an assignment, the lecturer will not appreciate and say refer back to module syllabus. I've done dozens of business plans before attending university, and whilst attending university, never had a single criticism from investors nor clients. But it seems when I did the same for a particular module in this course, it was given a somewhat disappointing result. The reasoning was because they just wanted theory, which ofcourse doesn't work in the real world. In fact investors would kick you on your backside if you talked theory to them.

It's difficult for me to describe in words what the problem is with the modules in a nutshell, but I would say it leads back to the culture within the lecturers. No one seems to connect when preparing the modules. This is especially apparent with modules where its' sectioned and run by different lecturers - it seems they never really talk to eachother and instead just do their part. If we were to do that for an assignment, a lecturer would critique it immediately and say the "style isn't the same" but why is it a different rule for them ? Surely they're not hypocrites, **SHOCK HORROR** :eek:

The bottom line here is that there'll be huge gaps in your knowledge with regards to accountancy and finance. I would go as far as saying most of the stuff you'll learn isn't really going to be helpful for you in the real world. I know I know, you don't want a course that's too difficult, but I wish I could describe to you in words what I mean by my above statement. It's like they're teaching you 1+1 must always equal 2, any decent mathematician ofcourse can argue that, and its this argument that's lacking from this course - you're not shown different ways of thinking. It's all too theoretical.


The City/External Factors


I think its wrong of me to comment on this considering I'm referring to the ACFI course itself, so I won't.


Conclusion

I would really suggest you go for an apprenticeship in accountancy if you just want to do ACCA and your only uni choice is DMU. Or if you're like me and want to make something of yourself via finance or a business and you're sociable, choose another university. The culture is disheartening, especially if you're coming to university for the overall experience and I'd never have even considered DMU ACFI if I had to pay £9000/year - you'll never see a return on that. I tried to give an impartial view of the course, and have not specifically written about how they treated me - it may scare you from university entirely if I did! I will say this though; if you're like me who's quite open-minded and not a robot, this course will not be for you. The lecturers really couldn't care less and the course-mates are more like course-dogs.

If you have any questions related to accountancy and finance for DMU, feel free to message me. Don't bother reading the reviews on the internet for DMU, it really doesn't apply to ACFI. I haven't seen anyone bothering to write on the net about their ACFI experience (which just goes to show how crap this course is) so I thought I'd offer you guys some advice.


Hi,

I have similar concerns, but the difference is that I have an offer through clearing engineering year zero at DMU and an offer from the University of Hull for Mechanical Engineering with foundation year.

I felt that Hull is the better quality university, but if I go to De Montfort I can keep my part time job, it also feels familiar and has a more diverse and bigger student community than Hull.

Is it a bad mistake to pick De Montfort over Hull just for the social and work aspect?
I mean I have one shot at 9k a year, so I want to make the best choice (Hull), but at the same time I want the university that suits my needs (De Montfort)?

A few questions about your situation:

*Are you an international student?

*De Montfort seems to sell itself on their "university experience", social life and employability, from your experience did this live up to the hype?

*From Google Street View, De Montfort feels a lot like going back to college rather than going to uni, how would you rate the overall university rather than just the finance course?

*You said that your accounting course is th most profitable for DMU, in what ways is this so? Does this mean that as a result, all other courses will experience a similar lack of quality?

I am sorry you had a bad time at uni, hopefully you were able to at least transfer to a different university? :frown:
De Montfort University
De Montfort University
Leicester
Visit website
Reading this post made me glad that I changed my course. I was originally going to study A&F but then I changed it to Law at the last minute on results day.
Your opinions could have been consider-worthy if you didnt spend the first half kinda being racist. Just because you dont mix in with international students, doesnt mean others are incapable of doing so. But if you feel we're living in a time where whites can only befriends whites, there was no other whote person for you in accounting? Just sounds to me youre kinda stuck up and feel entitled, guess what, uni wasnt created around your needs.


As for everything else, fair points which you have every right to share, albeit slightly swayed by the initial impression you give out.
Original post by kasher93
Hi,
I've been quite a quiet person on here, and haven't even bothered to create an account up until now, but I just wanted to give a friendly warning to all those planning to attend demontfort for accountancy or finance, seriously, if someone had told me this, I would not have gone.
I'm going to give an honest review of my experience, along with various other student's opinions from my course, and I'll lay it out so that I review each bits of it from the course.
I know it's a little lengthy, but please do read all of it as it may save you £27,000 in tuition fees. Make your decision very carefully.
Freshers
Right, I thought I'd start with the somewhat positive elements of the course. Freshers is ok, you meet people, and there are lots of events on. BUT, bare in mind this is very much like school; the older generation don't want to particularly speak to the youngers, and it's almost impossible to find people who do accountancy and finance at freshers. Why? Because the vast majority are international and arrive late/don't care for freshers and/or they're travelling from home/Birmingham and already have their social cliques.
Social Experience
As I said, you'll be woefully disappointed by course friends; vast majority stick amongst their own. Beyond that, if you want to find friends to travel with or go couchsurfing for example (like most university experiences) or do something more than clubbing (which trust me, after a year or so, you'll want to because the clubs are shocking) you'll have to pray you have gotten decent flatmates in your student accommodation, because as I said many people already have friends or tend to stick to their own social circles.
Your ACFI friends will always remain superficial, and will never actually turn into true friends. The best way I can describe ACFI friends is this; they treat each other like they're at Oxford university or competing for a £500k salary. Furthermore, if for example you're not planning to do ACCA and want to do CIMA/finance/or even run your own business, you'll be shunned and even the witches of Salem would somewhat feel sorry for you.
The chinese stick with the chinese, the browns stick with the browns, and the 1% of people that are inter-cultural? Well they mostly stick with their flatmates and/or local friends because they know better. Lets just put it this way, if you try and speak to the vast majority about political events or philosophical rhetoric, you'll get an empty gaze and somehow, the conversation will go back to ACCA. It's essentially like speaking to unbranded robots all holding the same piece of paper. No culture, no personality.

Lecturers

So this is where the juicy parts begin. Lecturers are at best; terrible. Seriously, this isn't just a biased experience, I have spoken to many others and spoken to other lecturers at other universities and were shocked by how lecturers treated students in this course. Most of them don't really care; they just want their salary. To add to that, they're teaching crap that isn't applicable to the modern world and expect you to regurgitate the same drivel for their assignments. Any signs of creativity, and you'll be shunned. I won't go into the modules itself as I've got a different section for that, but the lecturers are bad. I for example, have shown many of my assignments to other lecturers throughout different universities in UK, and they have said I've been marked down harshly.
Beyond that, I actually spoke to a friend who went to UCL who got only 50% in one of his assignments. Went to go speak to the lecturer, and lecturer saw he understood better and pushed his grade up to 68%. At DMU, you'll get shouted at and possibly even marked down for questioning their holiness. It's like they've all come to DMU to give up.
There are some lecturers that are decent, but their hands are tied and even say in their lectures "Oh but this model isn't applicable in the real world" - why examine us on it?:angry:
Most ACFI lecturers need to be sent to other universities and given shadow training to see how students should be dealt with. Not to mention their questionable "moderation", you will notice assignments where the lecturer says you haven't said a point, but you had done, and he clearly hasn't bothered to read the assignment in full. As I said, the core of the problem begins with lecturer culture; you know how you read in the news that lecturer and student discovered something? That won't happen here. It's like an elderly home; they've been sent to DMU because no one else wanted them or couldn't handle them.
More to the point, it seems many of them have no understanding of the real world. I've been working in the real world whilst at university and some of the drivel the lecturers say even got my clients laughing. It's all very bureaucratic, and I really don't think they deserve the salaries they're getting. Most lecturers contradict themselves constantly, and then argue with you for outsmarting them.
Modules
Right so the modules themselves. I think it's good if we were still living in 1999 and you're only planning to do ACCA. The modules certainly do not "broaden your horizons".
The first problem is there's no optional IT module for ACFI students. I know you must be thinking but I know how to use all that, which is great, but what about accountancy-software and advanced excel? Again, if you're like me and are pretty good with computers, you can probably answer that with your head held up high, but almost all accountancy/finance related employers chuck you in the deep-end with some accountancy software or at the very least advanced spreadsheets. I'm not aware if this is a problem in other universities as well, but this definitely should be an optional module. 99% of office work is done on a computer, and they should've complimented the modules with an IT module, would've been boring for some of us, but at least it showed they cared + I'm not exactly proficient with SAGE, they should've taught you it.
Moreover, I think the other problem is the content; it seems like it hasn't been updated for years and is the same rubbish just with different years stamped on it. Finance and accountancy are both changing constantly (much to most people's beliefs) but that just doesn't come out of the course.
Again its almost like they've given up even though this is their most profitable/best course. If for example you try and implement modern-day creativity to the problem presented in an assignment, the lecturer will not appreciate and say refer back to module syllabus. I've done dozens of business plans before attending university, and whilst attending university, never had a single criticism from investors nor clients. But it seems when I did the same for a particular module in this course, it was given a somewhat disappointing result. The reasoning was because they just wanted theory, which ofcourse doesn't work in the real world. In fact investors would kick you on your backside if you talked theory to them.
It's difficult for me to describe in words what the problem is with the modules in a nutshell, but I would say it leads back to the culture within the lecturers. No one seems to connect when preparing the modules. This is especially apparent with modules where its' sectioned and run by different lecturers - it seems they never really talk to eachother and instead just do their part. If we were to do that for an assignment, a lecturer would critique it immediately and say the "style isn't the same" but why is it a different rule for them ? Surely they're not hypocrites, **SHOCK HORROR** :eek:
The bottom line here is that there'll be huge gaps in your knowledge with regards to accountancy and finance. I would go as far as saying most of the stuff you'll learn isn't really going to be helpful for you in the real world. I know I know, you don't want a course that's too difficult, but I wish I could describe to you in words what I mean by my above statement. It's like they're teaching you 1+1 must always equal 2, any decent mathematician ofcourse can argue that, and its this argument that's lacking from this course - you're not shown different ways of thinking. It's all too theoretical.

The City/External Factors

I think its wrong of me to comment on this considering I'm referring to the ACFI course itself, so I won't.

Conclusion
I would really suggest you go for an apprenticeship in accountancy if you just want to do ACCA and your only uni choice is DMU. Or if you're like me and want to make something of yourself via finance or a business and you're sociable, choose another university. The culture is disheartening, especially if you're coming to university for the overall experience and I'd never have even considered DMU ACFI if I had to pay £9000/year - you'll never see a return on that. I tried to give an impartial view of the course, and have not specifically written about how they treated me - it may scare you from university entirely if I did! I will say this though; if you're like me who's quite open-minded and not a robot, this course will not be for you. The lecturers really couldn't care less and the course-mates are more like course-dogs.
If you have any questions related to accountancy and finance for DMU, feel free to message me. Don't bother reading the reviews on the internet for DMU, it really doesn't apply to ACFI. I haven't seen anyone bothering to write on the net about their ACFI experience (which just goes to show how crap this course is) so I thought I'd offer you guys some advice.

Me seeing this after putting dmu as my firm choice for september to do accounting and finance
Original post by Anonymous
Me seeing this after putting dmu as my firm choice for september to do accounting and finance

Hi there @Anyonymous - I hope you're doing okay!👋

OP was dated 8 years ago and we like to think that every University should adapt, grow, and change over (and with) the times!

Of course, every student has their own - individual - experience and it is always a good idea to attend Open Days, or Campus Tours, chat to current (and past) students in-person or on TSR to get a full picture of what to expect! With this you can make an informed decision on what's right for you🧑*🎓

However, if you have any concerns or worries then please do contact our Team, the Enquiry Team, and we will be happy to discuss further with you😊

Please do chat to us on the following:
T ☎️: +44(0) 116 250 6070
E 📧: [email protected]

You can also chat to our current students via our Chat with a student (dmu.ac.uk) page👥🗣️

If we can help in anyway please do give us a bell!🔔
Best wishes,

-Rose🌹, De Montfort University Rep.

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