would anyone be able to mark my auden essay? AQA as lit b Watch

Cassiestar
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How does Auden tell the story in James Honeyman?
Fundamentally James Honeyman is told through a third person detached narrator, whose voice is used as a means of conveying any factual information-births, deaths and events for instance to the reader, however this also coincides with the a range of other narrative voices generally reflected through the use of direct speech, allowing for a poem told in an objective manner to incorporate some subjectivity whilst also acting as an effective means of foreshadowing and characterisation. James Honeyman is told in the ballad form however can be viewed as a subversion of convention as JH is an antihero, it can be considered a bildungsroman; hence the use of time is paramount in accelerating the narrative, through demonstrating progression in the characters life alongside progression in narrative structure.

Auden’s use of the third person narrator is fundamental in characterising JH from the outset to readers. Readers soon learn that James Honeyman was “a silent child he didn’t laugh or cry” hence augmenting a reader expectation of character, while looking retrospectively at the poem can be seen as a means of foreshadowing Honeyman sociopathic tendencies. The phrase “he didn’t laugh or cry” encapsulates his emotionless character, thus the narrative can be seen to be driven towards its destination from the outset. Auden then employs some direct speech within the narrative reiterating the previous characterisation of James Honeyman “he doesn’t play with the other children and that I think is sad” subsequently supporting the narrators previous use of characterisation through incorporating a range of narrative voices, thus developing the protagonist to the readers. Through the characterisation of James within his childhood it further supports the idea of the poem being a bildungsroman, hinting to the readers that the poem will be accelerated through the use of time and will follow the protagonist’s journey through life.

On a structural level Auden’s controlled manipulation of time is paramount when driving the narrative forward, Auden chooses to structure the narrative around various pivotal time periods within the protagonist life starting with his childhood “James Honeyman was a silent child” following through to his adolescence and finally through to his adulthood. This allows for progression in narrative structure, however more importantly for development in the protagonists life, with each stage acting as a paradigm shift within the general narrative structure, certainly the major shift in time towards his adult life can also be seen as marking a shift in the general tenor created through Auden. Whilst previously Auden seeks to develop a melancholic tone within the narrative, shown through the characterisation developed through Auden, whereas now a more jocund atmosphere is developed through the narrative, this is developed through Auden use of pathetic fallacy in order to encapsulate the intended atmosphere with phrases at the beginning of the narrative “the day was wet” augmenting the depressing tone, appearing juxtaposed to “hot nights of summer” demonstrating the paradigm shift in which has taken place within the narrative structure.

Auden’s use of the detached narrator acts as a principal method of acceleration within the narrative whilst also allowing him to develop the narrative beyond various stages Auden uses the narrator as a discourse marker for different stages within the narrative “Walked out on Sundays” hence developing the event in which the narrative will be centred around in each stanza, whilst the use of the minor syntactic structure to mimic the voice of the narrator consolidates the ballad form, which may seem strikingly juxtaposed to the treachery within the latter section of the poem, through Auden’s employment of the ballad form it makes the events within the narrative appear trivial, in remarkable contrast to how a reader will perceive them. However despite the third person detached narrator being the main driving force throughout the narrative, Auden incorporates a range of other narrative voices ranging from the more detached tone of the villagers “They’re bombers! War must have been declared!” which is employed as a means of initially generating tension within the narrative, to the personal narrative voice of Honeyman’s family “O put your arms around me. For my lungs are full of Honeyman’s NPC” Interestingly Auden chooses to switch the narrative round in the final 6 stanzas, this is crucial when reaching the moment of climax within the narrative as it allows to generate an emotional aspect of the narrative in which has been deficit for a majority of the poem. Auden uses the medium of direct speech to generate this switch in narrative structure, with the phrase “Honeyman NPC” becoming almost a motif used to drive the narrative through its conclusive stages.
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sumaya.ali
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perhaps you should put yourself in actual forum that id would be better and someone would mark it , as by doing this no one would come across your work .

Hope that helped




QUOTE=Cassiestar;55203235]How does Auden tell the story in James Honeyman?
Fundamentally James Honeyman is told through a third person detached narrator, whose voice is used as a means of conveying any factual information-births, deaths and events for instance to the reader, however this also coincides with the a range of other narrative voices generally reflected through the use of direct speech, allowing for a poem told in an objective manner to incorporate some subjectivity whilst also acting as an effective means of foreshadowing and characterisation. James Honeyman is told in the ballad form however can be viewed as a subversion of convention as JH is an antihero, it can be considered a bildungsroman; hence the use of time is paramount in accelerating the narrative, through demonstrating progression in the characters life alongside progression in narrative structure.

Auden’s use of the third person narrator is fundamental in characterising JH from the outset to readers. Readers soon learn that James Honeyman was “a silent child he didn’t laugh or cry” hence augmenting a reader expectation of character, while looking retrospectively at the poem can be seen as a means of foreshadowing Honeyman sociopathic tendencies. The phrase “he didn’t laugh or cry” encapsulates his emotionless character, thus the narrative can be seen to be driven towards its destination from the outset. Auden then employs some direct speech within the narrative reiterating the previous characterisation of James Honeyman “he doesn’t play with the other children and that I think is sad” subsequently supporting the narrators previous use of characterisation through incorporating a range of narrative voices, thus developing the protagonist to the readers. Through the characterisation of James within his childhood it further supports the idea of the poem being a bildungsroman, hinting to the readers that the poem will be accelerated through the use of time and will follow the protagonist’s journey through life.

On a structural level Auden’s controlled manipulation of time is paramount when driving the narrative forward, Auden chooses to structure the narrative around various pivotal time periods within the protagonist life starting with his childhood “James Honeyman was a silent child” following through to his adolescence and finally through to his adulthood. This allows for progression in narrative structure, however more importantly for development in the protagonists life, with each stage acting as a paradigm shift within the general narrative structure, certainly the major shift in time towards his adult life can also be seen as marking a shift in the general tenor created through Auden. Whilst previously Auden seeks to develop a melancholic tone within the narrative, shown through the characterisation developed through Auden, whereas now a more jocund atmosphere is developed through the narrative, this is developed through Auden use of pathetic fallacy in order to encapsulate the intended atmosphere with phrases at the beginning of the narrative “the day was wet” augmenting the depressing tone, appearing juxtaposed to “hot nights of summer” demonstrating the paradigm shift in which has taken place within the narrative structure.

Auden’s use of the detached narrator acts as a principal method of acceleration within the narrative whilst also allowing him to develop the narrative beyond various stages Auden uses the narrator as a discourse marker for different stages within the narrative “Walked out on Sundays” hence developing the event in which the narrative will be centred around in each stanza, whilst the use of the minor syntactic structure to mimic the voice of the narrator consolidates the ballad form, which may seem strikingly juxtaposed to the treachery within the latter section of the poem, through Auden’s employment of the ballad form it makes the events within the narrative appear trivial, in remarkable contrast to how a reader will perceive them. However despite the third person detached narrator being the main driving force throughout the narrative, Auden incorporates a range of other narrative voices ranging from the more detached tone of the villagers “They’re bombers! War must have been declared!” which is employed as a means of initially generating tension within the narrative, to the personal narrative voice of Honeyman’s family “O put your arms around me. For my lungs are full of Honeyman’s NPC” Interestingly Auden chooses to switch the narrative round in the final 6 stanzas, this is crucial when reaching the moment of climax within the narrative as it allows to generate an emotional aspect of the narrative in which has been deficit for a majority of the poem. Auden uses the medium of direct speech to generate this switch in narrative structure, with the phrase “Honeyman NPC” becoming almost a motif used to drive the narrative through its conclusive stages.[/QUOTE]
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