ArmyJobs - Application Process (Officer, Solider and Reservist)

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#1
Regular Officer
Application Process

Getting started
Use role finder to see what job might suit you. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.)
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Interview
If you've passed the medical screening, you’ll be given a Candidate Support Manager (CSM). Their job is to help you during the joining process. You’ll then be invited for an interview with a Senior Careers Advisor (SCA). This lets you ask questions and allows the SCA to see if you are suitable for the Army. They will also give you advice on how to prepare for the Army Officer Selection Board.
After your interview you will need to fill out your medical declaration (RGMD), this is handed to your GP, and Optician if required, reviewed by Westbury. You'll then be booked in for a medical assessment.


Assessment
Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB) is in two parts: a 24-hour briefing and a 3½ day Main Selection Board:
At the 24-hour briefing you'll perform physical and practical exercises to test your leadership and teamwork potential.
Once you pass AOSB Briefing you will be asked back to attend Main Board. Over a 3½ day period you’ll be assessed physically and mentally to demonstrate your abilities. You can find example exercises in the download library
Succeed, and you’ll be offered an officer training place at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS). Before your offer of employment can be confirmed, you'll need to complete some security forms and your doctor will be required to provide information.
Some candidates may be asked to attend an 11-week course at the Army School of Education, Worthy Down before starting at Sandhurst. This focuses on academic skills, cultural awareness and contemporary knowledge.


Training
Once you’ve accepted a place at Sandhurst, you’ll need to attend a mandatory 5 day pre-course briefing (PCCBC) where you’ll learn more about the course, have a medical and be issued some of your uniform.
Your officer career begins at Sandhurst where you will complete a 44-week course. This involves military and leadership training, preparing you for your first appointment as an officer.


Specialist training
Once you have completed your initial training at Sandhurst (and become a ‘commissioned’ officer), you will undertake specialist training to prepare you for your first appointment. The emphasis here will be on developing your leadership skills in a practical context. Continual professional development is a theme of Army life.


PQ Officer
Professionally Qualified Officers will undergo an additional Army Selection Board before or after their completion of Army Officer Selection Board. They will also complete as a shorter course at Sandhurst.
If you have any of these skills, looking to join the Army, but are older than 26, you can still apply. Contact our team on 0345 600 8080 for advice on how to submit your application.


Regular Solider
Application Process

Getting started
Use role finder to see what job might suit you. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to anArmy Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Interview
If you are medically fit, you’ll be invited for an interview with a Careers Advisor (CA). This lets you ask questions and allows the CA to see if you are suitable for the Army.
At this stage, you are also given a Candidate Support Manager (CSM). Their job is to help you during the joining process.


Assessment
If you meet eligibility standards, you’ll be invited to spend two days at an Assessment Centre. Here, you’ll do physical and mental tests to judge your fitness and soldier potential and have a medical examination. If you pass, you’ll be offered a job in the Army.
Before your employment offer is confirmed, you also need to have a pre-employment check. This involves filling out security forms and your doctor will need to send information about your medical background.
Your starting date will depend on your grade during assessment and the number of places the Army has on offer in your chosen trade.
Make sure you discuss your result with your Candidate Support Manager as they will be able to explain the next steps.


Training
Your Army career begins with phase 1 training where you learn basic soldier skills. You then learn the specialist skills of your trade in Phase 2.
Where you do your phase 1 training depends on your age and job choice.
Junior Soldiers (under 17 yr 5 mths) spend 20-week or 40-weeks at AFC Harrogate. If you are older, you will spend 14-weeks at either Pirbright or Winchester. Infantry recruits complete a combined phase 1 and 2 courses in Catterick.
After completing phase 1 and phase 2 training, you will join your unit where senior soldiers will provide support and ongoing professional development.


PQ Soldier & specialists
Some medical trades are classified as Professionally Qualified Soldier roles. If you apply to fill one of these you will need to go through an Army Selection Board prior to your initial training.
Some other specialist roles will need you to pass a specialist board, for example musicians wanting to join the Corps of Army Music have to pass an audition.
If you have any of these skills, looking to join the Army, but are older than 33, you can still apply. Contact our team on 0345 600 8080 for advice on how to submit your application.



Reserve Officer
Application Process

Getting started
Use role finder to see what job might suit you. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to anArmy Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Interview
If you're medically fit, you'll get a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) to support you.
You will be expected to contact or visit a Reserve unit. If you need help with this, your CSM can help you.
You'll be asked to interview with a Senior Career Advisor (SCA). This lets you ask questions and lets the SCA see if you're suitable. They'll also give you advice on how to prepare for the Army Officer Selection Board.
After your interview you will need to fill out your medical declaration (RGMD), this is handed to your GP, and Optician if required, reviewed by Westbury. You'll then be booked in for a medical assessment.


Assessment
The next step in officer assessment is at the Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB). This is in two parts: a 24-hour briefing and a 3½ day Main Selection Board:
24-hour briefing (over a 2 day period)At the briefing you'll undertake physical and practical exercises designed to test your leadership and teamwork potential. This is your chance to learn and prepare for the next step, Main Board selection. The AOSB prep document will help you get ready for this.
Main Board
Once you pass AOSB Briefing you will be asked back to attend Main Board. Over a 3½ day period you’ll be assessed physically and mentally to demonstrate your abilities.
Succeed, and once some mandatory security checks are carried you will be handed over to your local OTC (Officer Training Corps) for attestation and loading to a Commissioning course at RMAS, Sandhurst.


Training
You can complete your officer training in modules or in one consolidated package depending on your circumstances. Both options will see you receive your commission on completion of your training at Sandhurst.

Leadership skills
Initial military training is a series of modules to develop your military, leadership and tactical skills and enables you to learn the same skills as Regular Army officers.
The first 3 modules are 6 weekends at a Regional Training Centre or Officer Training Regiment, followed by 10 weekends or a 2-week consolidated course. This ends with a 10-day course which prepares you for officer training at Sandhurst.
Commissioning Course
The Reserve Army Commissioning Course at Sandhurst is considered to deliver world class leadership and management training. The 3-week course is designed to further develop your leadership ability and give you the key military skills required to have a successful Reserve career.
Consolidation training
Once you have finished the Commissioning Course at Sandhurst you will complete a final module which is a further 3 weekends of training. This covers management and leadership aspects, including planning and specific demands on an Army Officer.


Specialist training
Once you’re commissioned you will always have the option to further develop your management and leadership skills. Continual professional development is a theme of Army life and you will have the opportunity to gain professional qualifications, as well as adventurous training qualifications.


PQ Officers
As a Professionally Qualified Officer, selection will be at the Army Officer Selection Board, but there are some differences depending on the trade you wish to join. There is no option for modular training - training consists of two two-week courses.


Reserve Soldier
Application Process

Getting started
Use In Your Area to find out what local units may be available for you to join, as well as role finder to help you choose what roles may be suitable for you. You will need to check with your preferred unit what roles they have available. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to an Army Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Face to face
If you’re medically fit you will be assigned to a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) who will guide you through the recruitment process. At this stage you will also be invited to a Face to Face chat at your chosen and most suitable unit. This lets you ask questions and allows the unit’s recruiting team to see if you are suitable for the Army Reserve. This is important because it also allows you to ensure that the unit is right for you. If you have not yet chosen a job preference the unit will be able to tell you about what is available to you.
The recruiting team will identify what training and development you require to be ready for the next stage of the application process.


Assessment
If you meet eligibility requirements and have completed your training and development set by your unit, you’ll be invited to spend 2 days at the Assessment Centre.
Here, you’ll do physical and mental tests to judge your fitness and soldier potential, plus have a medical examination. If you pass and have taken all the required documentation with you, you’ll be offered the chance to enlist into the Army Reserves.
You'll need to complete pre-employment checks, which involve filling out security forms and completing final medical checks which involve your Doctor sending us information about your medical background.


Training
Once you have been enlisted and your medical checks have been completed you will be booked to start your initial training to learn the basic soldier skills.
You don’t have to do all the training at once. It can be completed in shorter modules or in one go. Further training also takes place in your spare time. It can take weeks or months depending on your role, course and how much time you can give.
Drill nights at your unit will allow them to give you advice and support.


PQ soldiers
To join the Army Reserve as a Professionally Qualified Soldier you will need to be either a qualified healthcare professional, in the final year of qualification or undergoing training in the NHS.


If you are ready to go thats great! You can apply here: http://bit.ly/TSRJoin

We Here at ArmyJobs wish you the best of luck with your application.
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LondonPlayboy
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#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
(Original post by ArmyJobs)
Regular Officer
Application Process


Reserve Officer
Application Process

Getting started
Use role finder to see what job might suit you. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to anArmy Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Interview
If you're medically fit, you'll get a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) to support you.
You will be expected to contact or visit a Reserve unit. If you need help with this, your CSM can help you.
You'll be asked to interview with a Senior Career Advisor (SCA). This lets you ask questions and lets the SCA see if you're suitable. They'll also give you advice on how to prepare for the Army Officer Selection Board.
After your interview you will need to fill out your medical declaration (RGMD), this is handed to your GP, and Optician if required, reviewed by Westbury. You'll then be booked in for a medical assessment.


Assessment
The next step in officer assessment is at the Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB). This is in two parts: a 24-hour briefing and a 3½ day Main Selection Board:
24-hour briefing (over a 2 day period)At the briefing you'll undertake physical and practical exercises designed to test your leadership and teamwork potential. This is your chance to learn and prepare for the next step, Main Board selection. The AOSB prep document will help you get ready for this.
Main Board
Once you pass AOSB Briefing you will be asked back to attend Main Board. Over a 3½ day period you’ll be assessed physically and mentally to demonstrate your abilities.
Succeed, and once some mandatory security checks are carried you will be handed over to your local OTC (Officer Training Corps) for attestation and loading to a Commissioning course at RMAS, Sandhurst.


Training
You can complete your officer training in modules or in one consolidated package depending on your circumstances. Both options will see you receive your commission on completion of your training at Sandhurst.

Leadership skills
Initial military training is a series of modules to develop your military, leadership and tactical skills and enables you to learn the same skills as Regular Army officers.
The first 3 modules are 6 weekends at a Regional Training Centre or Officer Training Regiment, followed by 10 weekends or a 2-week consolidated course. This ends with a 10-day course which prepares you for officer training at Sandhurst.
Commissioning Course
The Reserve Army Commissioning Course at Sandhurst is considered to deliver world class leadership and management training. The 3-week course is designed to further develop your leadership ability and give you the key military skills required to have a successful Reserve career.
Consolidation training
Once you have finished the Commissioning Course at Sandhurst you will complete a final module which is a further 3 weekends of training. This covers management and leadership aspects, including planning and specific demands on an Army Officer.


Specialist training
Once you’re commissioned you will always have the option to further develop your management and leadership skills. Continual professional development is a theme of Army life and you will have the opportunity to gain professional qualifications, as well as adventurous training qualifications.


PQ Officers
As a Professionally Qualified Officer, selection will be at the Army Officer Selection Board, but there are some differences depending on the trade you wish to join. There is no option for modular training - training consists of two two-week courses.




If you are ready to go thats great! You can apply here: http://bit.ly/TSRJoin

We Here at ArmyJobs wish you the best of luck with your application.
Hello I currently partake in my University OTC but haven't received a great amount of clarification regarding the Reserve Officer route for Short Service Commission (3 years).

I have been recommenced by my detachment to commission full time but there are a number of questions I haven't had clarified:

- Will all reserve officers be deployed during this period?
- How do reserve officers balance their respective careers - i.e. in corporate law for example.
- After you completed Mod 1-4 now Alpha-Bravo, of the Reserve curriculum is there a time by which you are able to change your mind and de-commission?

Thank you.
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Netty27
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#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
What if your pregnant but want to join the Army?
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ArmyJobs
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#4
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by Netty27)
What if your pregnant but want to join the Army?
Hi Netty27,

Thank you for getting in touch, If you are wanting to apply for the British Army, you can do this 6 months after child birth. In the mean time, I would research the role that you would like to apply for and what Army Life would be like.

If you have any other questions, please don't hesitate to ask.

Regards
ArmyJobs
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Netty27
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#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
Thank u for getting back to me this sounds very reassuring and i look forward to joining next year. I qould like to go into the mental health side of the Army.
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ArmyJobs
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#6
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by Netty27)
Thank u for getting back to me this sounds very reassuring and i look forward to joining next year. I qould like to go into the mental health side of the Army.
Hi Netty,

Thank you for your reply. That's a great career, Do you have any experience in Mental Health Nursing?

Regards
ArmyJobs
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username1899909
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#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
Do officers need a degree ? because i heard 90% of officer candidates have degrees ?
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HappyLifting
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#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
After completing an Accounting and Finance degree is it not possible to go directly into this role https://www.army.mod.uk/rolefinder/r...nt-accountant?

I realise it says you should already have served as a HR Combat specialist.
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JMcGregor
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#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
Hi,

Im currently studying applied Biomedical science at Portsmouth uni. Ive completed 1/3rd of my HCPC profile and done training in a hospital. This is my first year. Can I join the army and continue this course at de montfort uni starting yr 2 - or would I have to begin from scratch?

Thanks,
J
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WolfGangPro
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#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
Im currently 22, male, diagnosed with ASD (High functioning), ADHD, Dyslexia, Depression (Wouldn't you be)

Have A levels, went to uni to study Law however had an accident which forced me to defer.

I haven't taken medication since the age of 16/17

I spoke to a careers advisor a few years ago and he said I would be fine to join, however I have read contrary information regarding this.

Would I still be able to enrol for officer

Thanks

(Original post by ArmyJobs)
Regular Officer
Application Process

Getting started
Use role finder to see what job might suit you. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.)
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Interview
If you've passed the medical screening, you’ll be given a Candidate Support Manager (CSM). Their job is to help you during the joining process. You’ll then be invited for an interview with a Senior Careers Advisor (SCA). This lets you ask questions and allows the SCA to see if you are suitable for the Army. They will also give you advice on how to prepare for the Army Officer Selection Board.
After your interview you will need to fill out your medical declaration (RGMD), this is handed to your GP, and Optician if required, reviewed by Westbury. You'll then be booked in for a medical assessment.


Assessment
Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB) is in two parts: a 24-hour briefing and a 3½ day Main Selection Board:
At the 24-hour briefing you'll perform physical and practical exercises to test your leadership and teamwork potential.
Once you pass AOSB Briefing you will be asked back to attend Main Board. Over a 3½ day period you’ll be assessed physically and mentally to demonstrate your abilities. You can find example exercises in the download library
Succeed, and you’ll be offered an officer training place at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS). Before your offer of employment can be confirmed, you'll need to complete some security forms and your doctor will be required to provide information.
Some candidates may be asked to attend an 11-week course at the Army School of Education, Worthy Down before starting at Sandhurst. This focuses on academic skills, cultural awareness and contemporary knowledge.


Training
Once you’ve accepted a place at Sandhurst, you’ll need to attend a mandatory 5 day pre-course briefing (PCCBC) where you’ll learn more about the course, have a medical and be issued some of your uniform.
Your officer career begins at Sandhurst where you will complete a 44-week course. This involves military and leadership training, preparing you for your first appointment as an officer.


Specialist training
Once you have completed your initial training at Sandhurst (and become a ‘commissioned’ officer), you will undertake specialist training to prepare you for your first appointment. The emphasis here will be on developing your leadership skills in a practical context. Continual professional development is a theme of Army life.


PQ Officer
Professionally Qualified Officers will undergo an additional Army Selection Board before or after their completion of Army Officer Selection Board. They will also complete as a shorter course at Sandhurst.
If you have any of these skills, looking to join the Army, but are older than 26, you can still apply. Contact our team on 0345 600 8080 for advice on how to submit your application.


Regular Solider
Application Process

Getting started
Use role finder to see what job might suit you. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to anArmy Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Interview
If you are medically fit, you’ll be invited for an interview with a Careers Advisor (CA). This lets you ask questions and allows the CA to see if you are suitable for the Army.
At this stage, you are also given a Candidate Support Manager (CSM). Their job is to help you during the joining process.


Assessment
If you meet eligibility standards, you’ll be invited to spend two days at an Assessment Centre. Here, you’ll do physical and mental tests to judge your fitness and soldier potential and have a medical examination. If you pass, you’ll be offered a job in the Army.
Before your employment offer is confirmed, you also need to have a pre-employment check. This involves filling out security forms and your doctor will need to send information about your medical background.
Your starting date will depend on your grade during assessment and the number of places the Army has on offer in your chosen trade.
Make sure you discuss your result with your Candidate Support Manager as they will be able to explain the next steps.


Training
Your Army career begins with phase 1 training where you learn basic soldier skills. You then learn the specialist skills of your trade in Phase 2.
Where you do your phase 1 training depends on your age and job choice.
Junior Soldiers (under 17 yr 5 mths) spend 20-week or 40-weeks at AFC Harrogate. If you are older, you will spend 14-weeks at either Pirbright or Winchester. Infantry recruits complete a combined phase 1 and 2 courses in Catterick.
After completing phase 1 and phase 2 training, you will join your unit where senior soldiers will provide support and ongoing professional development.


PQ Soldier & specialists
Some medical trades are classified as Professionally Qualified Soldier roles. If you apply to fill one of these you will need to go through an Army Selection Board prior to your initial training.
Some other specialist roles will need you to pass a specialist board, for example musicians wanting to join the Corps of Army Music have to pass an audition.
If you have any of these skills, looking to join the Army, but are older than 33, you can still apply. Contact our team on 0345 600 8080 for advice on how to submit your application.



Reserve Officer
Application Process

Getting started
Use role finder to see what job might suit you. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to anArmy Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Interview
If you're medically fit, you'll get a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) to support you.
You will be expected to contact or visit a Reserve unit. If you need help with this, your CSM can help you.
You'll be asked to interview with a Senior Career Advisor (SCA). This lets you ask questions and lets the SCA see if you're suitable. They'll also give you advice on how to prepare for the Army Officer Selection Board.
After your interview you will need to fill out your medical declaration (RGMD), this is handed to your GP, and Optician if required, reviewed by Westbury. You'll then be booked in for a medical assessment.


Assessment
The next step in officer assessment is at the Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB). This is in two parts: a 24-hour briefing and a 3½ day Main Selection Board:
24-hour briefing (over a 2 day period)At the briefing you'll undertake physical and practical exercises designed to test your leadership and teamwork potential. This is your chance to learn and prepare for the next step, Main Board selection. The AOSB prep document will help you get ready for this.
Main Board
Once you pass AOSB Briefing you will be asked back to attend Main Board. Over a 3½ day period you’ll be assessed physically and mentally to demonstrate your abilities.
Succeed, and once some mandatory security checks are carried you will be handed over to your local OTC (Officer Training Corps) for attestation and loading to a Commissioning course at RMAS, Sandhurst.


Training
You can complete your officer training in modules or in one consolidated package depending on your circumstances. Both options will see you receive your commission on completion of your training at Sandhurst.

Leadership skills
Initial military training is a series of modules to develop your military, leadership and tactical skills and enables you to learn the same skills as Regular Army officers.
The first 3 modules are 6 weekends at a Regional Training Centre or Officer Training Regiment, followed by 10 weekends or a 2-week consolidated course. This ends with a 10-day course which prepares you for officer training at Sandhurst.
Commissioning Course
The Reserve Army Commissioning Course at Sandhurst is considered to deliver world class leadership and management training. The 3-week course is designed to further develop your leadership ability and give you the key military skills required to have a successful Reserve career.
Consolidation training
Once you have finished the Commissioning Course at Sandhurst you will complete a final module which is a further 3 weekends of training. This covers management and leadership aspects, including planning and specific demands on an Army Officer.


Specialist training
Once you’re commissioned you will always have the option to further develop your management and leadership skills. Continual professional development is a theme of Army life and you will have the opportunity to gain professional qualifications, as well as adventurous training qualifications.


PQ Officers
As a Professionally Qualified Officer, selection will be at the Army Officer Selection Board, but there are some differences depending on the trade you wish to join. There is no option for modular training - training consists of two two-week courses.


Reserve Soldier
Application Process

Getting started
Use In Your Area to find out what local units may be available for you to join, as well as role finder to help you choose what roles may be suitable for you. You will need to check with your preferred unit what roles they have available. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to an Army Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.


Face to face
If you’re medically fit you will be assigned to a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) who will guide you through the recruitment process. At this stage you will also be invited to a Face to Face chat at your chosen and most suitable unit. This lets you ask questions and allows the unit’s recruiting team to see if you are suitable for the Army Reserve. This is important because it also allows you to ensure that the unit is right for you. If you have not yet chosen a job preference the unit will be able to tell you about what is available to you.
The recruiting team will identify what training and development you require to be ready for the next stage of the application process.


Assessment
If you meet eligibility requirements and have completed your training and development set by your unit, you’ll be invited to spend 2 days at the Assessment Centre.
Here, you’ll do physical and mental tests to judge your fitness and soldier potential, plus have a medical examination. If you pass and have taken all the required documentation with you, you’ll be offered the chance to enlist into the Army Reserves.
You'll need to complete pre-employment checks, which involve filling out security forms and completing final medical checks which involve your Doctor sending us information about your medical background.


Training
Once you have been enlisted and your medical checks have been completed you will be booked to start your initial training to learn the basic soldier skills.
You don’t have to do all the training at once. It can be completed in shorter modules or in one go. Further training also takes place in your spare time. It can take weeks or months depending on your role, course and how much time you can give.
Drill nights at your unit will allow them to give you advice and support.


PQ soldiers
To join the Army Reserve as a Professionally Qualified Soldier you will need to be either a qualified healthcare professional, in the final year of qualification or undergoing training in the NHS.


If you are ready to go thats great! You can apply here: http://bit.ly/TSRJoin

We Here at ArmyJobs wish you the best of luck with your application.
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WolfGangPro
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#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by hazzer1998)
Do officers need a degree ? because i heard 90% of officer candidates have degrees ?
Officers dont require a degree, it is not a requirement however they strongly recommend an international studies degree, most officers do it whilst training, that is what I was told from my local Army career centre
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ArmyJobs
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#12
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by WolfGangPro)
Im currently 22, male, diagnosed with ASD (High functioning), ADHD, Dyslexia, Depression (Wouldn't you be)

Have A levels, went to uni to study Law however had an accident which forced me to defer.

I haven't taken medication since the age of 16/17

I spoke to a careers advisor a few years ago and he said I would be fine to join, however I have read contrary information regarding this.

Would I still be able to enrol for officer

Thanks

Hi,
Thank you for getting in touch, If you could send us a Private Message regarding your medical conditions that would be great. We will be able to advise this further.

Regards
ArmyJobs
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jcth12
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#13
Report 4 years ago
#13
How long would it typically take from applying to then doing the 2 day assessment?
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BRH123
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#14
Report 3 years ago
#14
Hey I am looking to join the army but have heard they don’t allow people to join if they have epilepsy Is this true?
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