Tennyson - How is the story told in... ? HELP! :-( Watch

shannargh
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I'm doing A.S English Lit and I need some help regarding the "how is the story told in...?" question. The poet that I'm doing for this is Tennyson so that includes:
Lotus-eaters and Choric Song
Ulysses
Godiva
The Lady of Shallot
Mariana
Tithonus
Does anyone have any past essays / advice / resources that they can share with me? I'm stuck and I've looked everywhere!
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Puddles the Monkey
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Heya, I'm going to put this in the English forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you!

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=82
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Luxkin
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Hi there, I haven't done the exam yet but I'm studying the same poems as you

I've found it easiest to do one paragraph on form, one on structure and one on language, and one introduction paragraph. The introduction paragraph should be a brief summary of the story and form. Each paragraph should have a variety of different interpretations of the form/structure/language, and give details on how each is useful in "telling the story"- for example establishing character or setting.

Also it is helpful to use literary vocabulary to show how much you know - frequently use words such as "sibilance", "climax", "denouement", "ballad form", "1st person narrative" in order to demonstrate your understanding on literature and the text.

An example of some points you could make:
In 'The Lotos Eaters' the first 5 stanzas are written in the form of Spenserian stanzas, originally employed by Spenser in his epic 'The faerie queene.' This 'epic' form adds a sense of power and the archaic to the poem, and thus tells the story by establishing the 'epic' literary setting of the poem. Additionally, Spenserian stanzas are often regarded as a 'perfect' literary form, and so this may parallel the 'perfect' nature of the island, thus telling the story by establishing the setting. This 'beautiful' and regular poetic form is contrasted in the last 9 stanzas of the poem which form the 'Choric Song.' The loss of a regular structure in the 'Choric Song' may be used to characterise the sailors, representing the 'loss of structure' in their lives. The change in form appears to represent a 'distorted view' of the poem for the reader, and thus could align the readers' view with the 'distorted' one of the sailors after consuming the Lotos flower. Furthermore, if the poem is read as a condemnation of drug-taking, the irregular stanza length after the consumption of the Lotos flower may represent the chaos and confusion that taking drugs can cause, and help tell the story of the sailors' descent into a state of haziness and weariness.

Hope this helps, and best of luck with the exam! ^_^
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mariyum64
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you jus have to talk about the narrative aspects in the poem and explain them in seperate paragraphs. there's usually 3 main narrative aspects to focus on for each poem, e.g. the lotos eaters - destination, voice and setting.
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