Who are you voting for in the October re - general election ? Watch

democracyforum
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there will be another hung parliament, so


Will UKIP and Conservatives finally do a pre-election pact ?

Will SNP and Labour do a pre election coalition ?
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democracyforum
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or the same vote ?
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by democracyforum)
or the same vote ?
In 1910 the Parliament became a little more hung.

In 1924 the opposition won outright mostly at the expense of the third party

In 1951 the opposition won outright

In 1966 the government strengthened its position

In 1974 the government marginally strengthened its position

And the winning numbers in tonight's lottery are...
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Rakas21
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(Original post by democracyforum)
there will be another hung parliament, so

Will UKIP and Conservatives finally do a pre-election pact ?

Will SNP and Labour do a pre election coalition ?
I do agree there's a fair possibility of a second election but right now i'm not sure who it would favour. The Tories would likely lose a bit of the vote without Cameron, Labour would likely gain without Miliband but the situation in Scotland would be unchanged. With Clegg gone the Libs would probably be strengthened.

So i'd wager Labour have more to gain from a second election.
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Jammy Duel
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Nobody because there won't be one that soon, and now is too early to tell since the leader of at least three of the main four parties (I'm including UKIP) will be replaced and perhaps send the parties in a different direction.

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democracyforum
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if the leaders change by the second election

there would also be a massive change in polls and votes

UKIP, no votes without farage

Labour may fall short, it depends

Conservatives - may be unstable too

lib dems - same amount of votes probably

greens - may see a surge
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Rakas21
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(Original post by democracyforum)
if the leaders change by the second election

there would also be a massive change in polls and votes

UKIP, no votes without farage

Labour may fall short, it depends

Conservatives - may be unstable too

lib dems - same amount of votes probably

greens - may see a surge
Can't see the green surge personally, the only parties that stand to gain from leadership changes are 2 of the 3 big ones.
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democracyforum
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Nobody because there won't be one that soon,
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why not ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_...,_October_1974
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Jammy Duel
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Beyond issues relating to the FTPA and the belief that neither condition will be meet not will the old system be brought back by October, there is little reason to call another election then unless something massive Galen's and it would likely be to neither party's benefit, it will just change the stalemate slightly. There won't be another election until FTPA decrees it or one of the parties can make genuine gains, which isn't for a couple of years most probably. That and engagement issues. And possible funding issues on the labour and lib dem fronts.

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democracyforum
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fail of a thread
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Jammy Duel
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What was that about an unsolvable hung parliament and second election
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Aj12
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
What was that about an unsolvable hung parliament and second election
Don't be too smug, I don't think anyone saw this coming.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by Aj12)
Don't be too smug, I don't think anyone saw this coming.
I didn't. I was optimistic, but not this much. Still expect another election before 2020 though, just with slightly different circumstances.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by democracyforum)
fail of a thread
Perhaps not.

With a small majority Cameron now has the power to repeal the fixed terms act and go to the polls once we start getting by-elections if his polling looks good.

The election won't come in October clearly but i'm very certain this parliament won't be lasting 5 years.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Perhaps not.

With a small majority Cameron now has the power to repeal the fixed terms act and go to the polls once we start getting by-elections if his polling looks good.

The election won't come in October clearly but i'm very certain this parliament won't be lasting 5 years.
That would appear totally cynical. Another govt could have abolished it but not one led by the man who introduced as a permanent.


Cameron wanted three constitutional changes:

Fixed term Parliaments to stop the press agitating for an election from the 3 year point.

An end to yearly reshuffles of ministers.

An end to the idea that Prime Ministerial successions involve slaying the incumbent.




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Rakas21
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
That would appear totally cynical. Another govt could have abolished it but not one led by the man who introduced as a permanent.


Cameron wanted three constitutional changes:

Fixed term Parliaments to stop the press agitating for an election from the 3 year point.

An end to yearly reshuffles of ministers.

An end to the idea that Prime Ministerial successions involve slaying the incumbent.

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Was the fixed terms act a Tory policy rather than a coalition one?
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Was the fixed terms act a Tory policy rather than a coalition one?
No, it was either coalition of Lib Dem, it was the Libs that puished it, presumably to keep them in for the full 5 years
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Mackay
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If only this was relevant.
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Nice.Guy
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#19
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
I didn't. I was optimistic, but not this much. Still expect another election before 2020 though, just with slightly different circumstances.
(Original post by Rakas21)
Perhaps not.

With a small majority Cameron now has the power to repeal the fixed terms act and go to the polls once we start getting by-elections if his polling looks good.

The election won't come in October clearly but i'm very certain this parliament won't be lasting 5 years.
Please expand on this...? Why wouldn't a Government last a full 5 years and whose decision would that be?
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Nice.Guy)
Please expand on this...? Why wouldn't a Government last a full 5 years and whose decision would that be?
If a Tory majority repeals the fixed terms act then its Cameron's choice.

It won't last 5 years because incumbent governments rarely win by-elections so the majority will slowly fall away.
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