meganm0ore
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This may sound a really stupid question, but our teacher has kind of rushed through this topic to get to the end of C3

What does it mean when an equilibrium is shifted to the left/right, due to temperature or pressure? (Using the example of the Haber Process)
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charco
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(Original post by meganm0ore)
This may sound a really stupid question, but our teacher has kind of rushed through this topic to get to the end of C3

What does it mean when an equilibrium is shifted to the left/right, due to temperature or pressure? (Using the example of the Haber Process)
The equilibrium occurs in a system. The position of equilibrium can be used to describe the relative concentrations of reactants and products.

When the position shifts the relative amounts of reactants and products changes either towards the products (RHS) or reactants (LHS).

Check out the links on this page http://www.ibchem.com/drop/htm/equ/index.htm
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kasim14
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(Original post by meganm0ore)
This may sound a really stupid question, but our teacher has kind of rushed through this topic to get to the end of C3

What does it mean when an equilibrium is shifted to the left/right, due to temperature or pressure? (Using the example of the Haber Process)
EXAMS is on 50 of September with university :rolleyes:
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kasim14
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don't youtube
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Moodicrus
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The way I think of it(using the Haber process):

The forward reaction is exothermic so it gives off heat. Equilibrium always wants to keep the conditions the same so if we lower the temperature then it is going to try and raise it, the only way it can is by increasing the rate of the forward reaction as it gives off heat. If we increase the temperature it is going to try and lower the temperature, this means reducing the forward reaction as it is exothermic.

the equation for the reaction is Image
So we have 4 moles of the reactants ( 1 mole nitrogen 3 moles hydrogen) to give 2 moles ( ammonia) which means that the reactants take up more space than the product. So if we raise the pressure it equilibria will try and lower it by turning more reactants into product as the product has less moles the the pressure will go down. If we decrease the pressure equilibria will try to raise the pressure by turning more product back into reactant as they have more moles.
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meganm0ore
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(Original post by Moodicrus)
The way I think of it(using the Haber process):

The forward reaction is exothermic so it gives off heat. Equilibrium always wants to keep the conditions the same so if we lower the temperature then it is going to try and raise it, the only way it can is by increasing the rate of the forward reaction as it gives off heat. If we increase the temperature it is going to try and lower the temperature, this means reducing the forward reaction as it is exothermic.

the equation for the reaction is Image
So we have 4 moles of the reactants ( 1 mole nitrogen 3 moles hydrogen) to give 2 moles ( ammonia) which means that the reactants take up more space than the product. So if we raise the pressure it equilibria will try and lower it by turning more reactants into product as the product has less moles the the pressure will go down. If we decrease the pressure equilibria will try to raise the pressure by turning more product back into reactant as they have more moles.
Thankyou so much, you were very helpful
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Mzwhocarez
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Remember that
1) TEMPERATURE increases, favours ENDOTHERMIC REACTION

2) Increase in PRESSURE favours side with less no: of moles (but remember.... that pressure on have an effect on an reaction if its a gas)

Hope it helps! Good Luck !
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vix.xvi
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(Original post by Mzwhocarez)
2) Increase in PRESSURE favours side with less no: of moles (but remember.... that pressure on have an effect on an reaction if its a gas)
Is this the number infront of the thing. For example 4He, the number of moles if 4 right?
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