_icecream
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#1
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#1
Does it involve providing personal care to patients i.e helping them to shower and go to the toilet? because I really can't do it
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claireestelle
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#2
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#2
Thats exactly what it involves, helping with personal care and medication. Depends on the setting exactly what you d be expected to do, looking at an individual job descriptions could help
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doodle_333
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#3
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#3
the specifics will depend on the service you work in, e.g. if it was more mental health based or working with milder intellectual disabilities there could well be no personal care involved - the personal care will vary too, some service users will have little motor control and you will have to wipe their bum etc whereas for others it is simply being with them and prompting which is a lot easier to cope with

other common tasks would be:
- finance management
- cleaning/cooking
- medication
- taking people to do activities e.g. bowling, out to eat
- taking people to run errands e.g. shopping, banking
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_icecream
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#4
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#4
(Original post by claireestelle)
Thats exactly what it involves, helping with personal care and medication. Depends on the setting exactly what you d be expected to do, looking at an individual job descriptions could help
ohhhh, are there other types of HCA that don't involve providing personal care to people? i.e in other departments in the hospital
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claireestelle
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#5
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#5
(Original post by _icecream)
ohhhh, are there other types of HCA that don't involve providing personal care to people? i.e in other departments in the hospital
there arent many around in hospitals but they could exist somewhere, but you never know how you ll feel about personal care until you ve tried it
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_icecream
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#6
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by doodle_333)
the specifics will depend on the service you work in, e.g. if it was more mental health based or working with milder intellectual disabilities there could well be no personal care involved - the personal care will vary too, some service users will have little motor control and you will have to wipe their bum etc whereas for others it is simply being with them and prompting which is a lot easier to cope with

other common tasks would be:
- finance management
- cleaning/cooking
- medication
- taking people to do activities e.g. bowling, out to eat
- taking people to run errands e.g. shopping, banking
So what are the roots to become a support worker for people with mental health problems?
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SA-1
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#7
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#7
(Original post by _icecream)
ohhhh, are there other types of HCA that don't involve providing personal care to people? i.e in other departments in the hospital
Probably not many HCA jobs, however there are other assistance jobs. Here you'll be providing assistant to the doctors carrying out their activities, rather than the patients.

Try searching for 'Hospital assistant' jobs
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SA-1
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#8
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#8
(Original post by _icecream)
So what are the roots to become a support worker for people with mental health problems?
In terms of experience?
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_icecream
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#9
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#9
(Original post by SA-1)
In terms of experience?
Yeah
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SA-1
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#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by _icecream)
Yeah
Loads and loads of places you can look in to that are tailored for people with brain injuries. Don't know if you're from London or not but there's this organisation that I volunteered at called Attend. It caters for people who have aquired brain injuries, who are out of the hospitals and are now trying to take that last step back in to life. People will all sorts of disabilities are there that stem from their brain injury and the staff there are really supportive (towards the volunteers [in terms of their career ambitions]) too.

I've found a few through a quick search:

Spoiler:
Show

Headway - The brain injury association

https://www.headway.org.uk/

Child Brain Injury Trust

childbraininjurytrust.org.uk/

WELCOME TO BASIC

www.basiccharity.org.uk/

The Silverlining Charity | Traumatic Brain Injury

www.thesilverlining.org.uk/#!tbi/c22s8


It's not so much about how close you can get the experience to what you want to pursue a career in, it's about what you can take from it. With the avenue that you're going down, one of the biggest things you'll need is to be able to communicate with people with brain injuries because it can be so difficult. So you can even look at getting experience in hospices, care homes etc. Remember, in care homes elderly people begin to experience issues with their brain.. and so become a lot harder to communicate with. I'm sure you know where I'm going with this.

Theres always a lot to take away from any experience
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_icecream
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#11
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by SA-1)
Loads and loads of places you can look in to that are tailored for people with brain injuries. Don't know if you're from London or not but there's this organisation that I volunteered at called Attend. It caters for people who have aquired brain injuries, who are out of the hospitals and are now trying to take that last step back in to life. People will all sorts of disabilities are there that stem from their brain injury and the staff there are really supportive (towards the volunteers [in terms of their career ambitions]) too.

I've found a few through a quick search:

Spoiler:
Show

Headway - The brain injury association

https://www.headway.org.uk/

Child Brain Injury Trust

childbraininjurytrust.org.uk/

WELCOME TO BASIC

www.basiccharity.org.uk/

The Silverlining Charity | Traumatic Brain Injury

www.thesilverlining.org.uk/#!tbi/c22s8


It's not so much about how close you can get the experience to what you want to pursue a career in, it's about what you can take from it. With the avenue that you're going down, one of the biggest things you'll need is to be able to communicate with people with brain injuries because it can be so difficult. So you can even look at getting experience in hospices, care homes etc. Remember, in care homes elderly people begin to experience issues with their brain.. and so become a lot harder to communicate with. I'm sure you know where I'm going with this.

Theres always a lot to take away from any experience
Thanks, I will try a bit of experience to see if I like it.
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doodle_333
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#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
(Original post by _icecream)
Thanks, I will try a bit of experience to see if I like it.
doing some volunteering to start with might be a good idea, you can see how much you enjoy other aspects of the role and meet people working in a supportive role and see what they do - volunteers should not be asked to do any personal care
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rachaelftw
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#13
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#13
It depends if you want to do it in the community or in a hospital setting.

Community based ones normally do involve personal-care however I did a placement on a Mental Health Acute ward, and the patients were all independent functioning so there was no personal care involved. It really does depend which type of setting you go for
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