XxChampXx
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi, Please can someone post some tips for IGCSE English Literature on how to get A*? I am doing tempest, importance of being Earnest, Songs of ourselves and stories of ourselves. Thank you in advance
0
reply
GreatBantz
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
Here's some general tips:

-- Never write an introduction. Ever. An introductory sentence is fine, but remember you only get marks for actually analysing the text.

-- Refer back to the question in every point you make. Using similar wording to the question helps as well. E.g. if the question was "how does *author* make this a dramatic moment in the story?" you would say something like "in this way, *author* makes this moment dramatic" at the end of your point.

-- Point, Evidence, Explanation. Make your point, give evidence of your point in the form of a quote and explain as clearly as you can how the quote backs up your point. The explanation bit is the most important - if you can do that part consistently well you'll get an A*.

EXAMPLE (made this up now ):

Another way in which the author makes this an exciting moment in the play is by using similes, an example of which is, "his eyes gleamed as brightly as the sun." In this case, a sense of excitement is created as it is clear that he is interested. This sense of excitement is strengthened through the use of a simile as it draws a direct comparison between the brightness of his eyes to the brightness of the sun, even though the sun is normally far brighter. As a result this moment in the poem is made very exciting.

Hope this helped
3
reply
neutraltones
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by GreatBantz)
Here's some general tips:

-- Never write an introduction. Ever. An introductory sentence is fine, but remember you only get marks for actually analysing the text.

-- Refer back to the question in every point you make. Using similar wording to the question helps as well. E.g. if the question was "how does *author* make this a dramatic moment in the story?" you would say something like "in this way, *author* makes this moment dramatic" at the end of your point.

-- Point, Evidence, Explanation. Make your point, give evidence of your point in the form of a quote and explain as clearly as you can how the quote backs up your point. The explanation bit is the most important - if you can do that part consistently well you'll get an A*.

EXAMPLE (made this up now ):

Another way in which the author makes this an exciting moment in the play is by using similes, an example of which is, "his eyes gleamed as brightly as the sun." In this case, a sense of excitement is created as it is clear that he is interested. This sense of excitement is strengthened through the use of a simile as it draws a direct comparison between the brightness of his eyes to the brightness of the sun, even though the sun is normally far brighter. As a result this moment in the poem is made very exciting.

Hope this helped
Personally I would disagree about your introduction point. You'll get marks for contextualizing the passage (if you are answering the passage based question) or generally giving the areas where the question is relevant. Secondly, 'signpost' or outline the three areas/themes/paragraphs in your essay. This helps to structure your essay and also allows you to show linkage between all the three paragraphs your going to make and how that links to the question.

Also buzzwords There's maybe 2 or 3 words in the question which you should try and use throughout your essay (or synonyms thereof) to link back to the question.

In your paragraph use the connotations of words to back up your point for instance:

When Hardy is describing the scene in 'Neutral tones' he talks about how the leaves 'had fallen from an ash'. Although on one hand he seems to be reffering to an ash tree, it also perhaps draws more metaphorical connotations of the extinguished flame of the two figure's relationship that only further emphasizes the dead landscape.

At the start of every paragraph include a topic sentence which all your other points are going to come from essentialy for instance;

Hardy vividly convey, the poet's feeling through the use of a monotone landscape, only further reflecting the subject's own depressed emotional state


And last of all embed small quotations. For instance instead of:

This is shown by 'and a few leaves lay on the starving sod'

try:

The deathly landscape is only further suggested by the dead 'leaves' lying on the 'starving sod'.

Last of all:personal response How does the poem make you feel, can you relate to it, what does it remind you of/ basically you have to use some imagination
2
reply
therealmcoy
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
I agree with everything written in the post above me, but I'd like to point out that, although it can sometimes be difficult when analysing modern prose, you should comment on the form as well as the language used.

So for language you should talk about: connotations of particular words, allusions, imagery, metaphors, similes, onomatopoeia

For form, you can talk about: alliteration, assonance, sibilance, rhyme, contrast, juxtaposition asyndetons, polysyndetons, iambic pentameter(shakespeare), repetition, sentence length

If you can use a point about the language used to support your point about the form used, that is even better.

After you have picked out the quotation and analysed the individual words, using form/langauge/both, you should talk about the effect those words/the whole quotation it has on the reader, relating to your analysis, for example, does it make us angry? Do we feel sorry for the character? Or something along those lines.

For example: ( I also made this up on the spot- it may not be up to scratch. I assume you know this story as you are doing the stories of ourselves)

Saki makes us afraid of Sredni Vashtar by making him sound frightening and deadly. Saki shows this when it says

'Sredni Vashtar went forth,
His thoughts were red thoughts and his teeth were white.
His enemies called for peace, but he brought them death.
Sredni Vashtar the beautiful.'

Saki uses the word 'red' to make Sredni Vashtar sound bloodthirsty and deadly, as red has connotations of bloodshed and murder, which also foreshadows the ending of the story. Saki contrasts the red with the white to strengthen the idea of bloodshed and murder. Saki also repeats the word 'thoughts' to emphasize the evil mindset of the ferret. This makes the reader afraid of Sredni Vashtar because we suspect there will be a murder, and it makes Sredni Vashtar sound evil and bloodthirsty. Saki also uses contrast to make Sredni Vashtar sound evil when he says 'his enemies called for peace, but he brought them death.' Peace has connotations of perfection and serenity, whereas death has connotations of grief and sadness, which completely contrasts the connotations of peace. This makes the reader feel scared of Sredni Vashtar, as he seems evil and will cause grief and sadness. Finally, Saki makes us afraid of Sredni Vashtar when he says 'Sredni Vashtar the beautiful.' This phrasing makes Sredni Vashtar sound like a god, which has connotations of being indestructible and powerful. This makes us scared of Sredni Vashtar as it seems as if he cannot be defeated.

Or something along those lines, you can probably write it better than me.

Hope this helps
2
reply
XxChampXx
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
Thank you so much for your suggestions
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • The University of Law
    Solicitor Series: Assessing Trainee Skills – LPC, GDL and MA Law - Guildford campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 29 Jan '20
  • Nottingham Trent University
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 29 Jan '20
  • University of Groningen
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 31 Jan '20

Have you ever signed up for an open day and then not gone to it?

Yes (215)
52.96%
No (191)
47.04%

Watched Threads

View All