My father's opinion of a Lib-Lab...

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username1528889
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I asked my dad by email about the possibility of a Lib-Lab (He's a Tory, but voting Libs this year):

" I would be very disappointed if, in so doing, I put labour into power. Remember that the best way out of poverty is not benefits but work, thereby giving people a stake in society and a sense of self respect and cutting tax for the less well-off is a better stimulus to economic growth as they will spend more. Giving people benefits which comes from taxation means that there is less money to spend. A general view for which there are exceptions I know but elections in the end are about generalities because no party can full represent you. As investors, a lack of confidence in the government (Labour are seen as anti-business) and a change in direction could have an impact on our investments which will not only effect us but also, ultimately, you and Philip. As a society we want to be enterprising - why do so many immigrants want to come here? Because the current Government has been a success story compared with much of Europe which puts state intervention first - sounds good and caring but ultimately leads to failure as a welfare state depends upon a healthy economy to fund it.from this week's Spectator
"When election day dawns, it’s worth bearing in mind that a million more people will be going to work than when David Cameron came to power. On an average day in Britain, there are 1,500 fewer reported crimes than there were before Theresa May was made Home Secretary. Some 2.2 million pupils now attend independent schools within the state system — schools given freedom through Michael Gove’s reforms. There is nothing theoretical about the advantages of Conservatism, but all this progress could be brought to a halt within the next week.
If Ed Miliband is elected, it will not be the richest who suffer most. They may pay more in tax — but on the whole they can afford to. Those who can afford to educate their children privately can be more relaxed about a fresh decline in state education under Labour.
Anyone who already lives in an affluent, safe neighbourhood and has a steady job can afford the luxury of a protest vote: Ukip, perhaps, or the Liberal Democrats. David Cameron has caused many of his former voters to despair, and they may want to punish him.
Those who would lose out under Labour are those who cannot afford a back-up plan. People desperately looking for a job will find fewer available once employers are under attack from a Miliband government that sees them as ‘predators’. Those already struggling to find a place to live will discover that availability shrinks once Labour’s rent controls are imposed. The elderly may have to pay higher fuel bills as companies prepare for Miliband’s two-year price freeze. The brunt of the Labour leader’s ideology will be borne by those who can least afford it.
Now, more than ever, a child’s life chances are dictated by quality of education — which is why Miliband’s hostility towards school reform is perhaps the most menacing and regressive of all his positions. Population growth means he cannot halt school expansion, but he wants at least to remove choice by ensuring that no new schools are allowed to open if there are spaces to fill in an existing one, no matter how bad it is. So again, those in nice neighbourhoods will have a choice of state schools. Those trapped in sink estates will not.


This election also contains a far broader constitutional question — about Britain’s relationship with the EU. If Cameron is Prime Minister, this will be settled by a democratic vote that will force Brussels to give their best offer on improved terms of UK membership. They will be negotiating not with politicians, but the British public through an in-out referendum. A Labour government would deny Britain this basic choice.
Like so many former bag-carriers who end up elected to parliament, Miliband has no experience outside the world of academia and politics. His ideas are demonstrably wrong and don’t work, as the 1970s showed, but that won’t stop him. As François Hollande has shown in France, policy wonks who end up in power can cause plenty of damage while testing out their naive ideas. The result is that jobs, wealth, opportunity and national standing all suffer.
The Labour party that is now threatening to take power is not the party of Tony Blair, who grudgingly understood the need for wealth creators. Blair led a Labour party that had been mugged by reality. Miliband’s party has not yet had that experience.
Miliband was once asked at a Labour party conference why he does not bring back socialism. ‘That is what we are doing,’ he replied. He now calls it ‘progressive change’. But as he knows, the substance of his politics is the same. Its consequences — unemployment, financial ruin, bad schools, unaffordable taxes — will be familiar to anybody who had the misfortune to live under the Labour governments of old.
Mr Cameron has done a bad job of selling the progressive nature of his reforms. Not once has he mentioned that soon, for the first time, a billion hours will be worked in Britain every week. Or that the 0.1 per cent of earners are now paying 12 per cent of all income tax, a record high. Or that pension poverty is at an all-time low. It is ironic that Cameron, a former PR man, has been awful at spin. As the record shows, the strength of his government lies in the substance.
It has been easy to despair of David Cameron over the years; the extent of our problems call for more radicalism, purpose and direction than he has felt able to apply. But as Churchill said of America, he does tend to do the right thing in the end — after exhausting all other options. You do not need to be a fan of Cameron to consider him far preferable to Miliband.
For this reason, the stakes could hardly be higher. It may be a wrench, and may involve more forgiveness than Mr Cameron is entitled to. But there really is more reason now than at any time in a generation to vote Tory."


and


Andrew Roberts

Biographer
The Cameron ministry of 2010-15 will go down in history as having made Britain as the most successful economy in the developed world, despite it having inherited a near-bankrupt nation from a Labour party that spent money like a drunken sailor on shore leave. Ordinarily that should be enough to have it returned to power with a huge majority, but we live in gnarled, chippy, egalitarian times. The Prime Minister has overseen a hugely successful Olympics; saved thousands from almost certain death in Benghazi; won referendums on the alternative vote and (for the present at least) Scottish independence; protected 400 free schools and the great Gove education reforms; tried to save thousands from Assad’s poison-gas attacks (and been prevented from doing so by Ed Miliband); held himself in the best traditions of the premiership while somehow retaining his naturalness and sense of humour; given Margaret Thatcher a fittingly splendid funeral; found £1 million to save Hougoumont Farmhouse on the Waterloo battlefield from collapse, and offered the British people their first vote on EU membership for four decades. All the time he looked the part of a national leader who mastered events rather than being mastered by them. He has his hero Harold Macmillan’s unflappability, a quality I suspect we won’t find at No. 10 should Mr Miliband be living there next month. I also admire David Cameron for insisting the countries of Nato all spend at least 2 per cent of GDP on defence; all he has to do in his second ministry is find the money to ensure that Britain does too (without fiddling the figures). If we cashier him for Ed Miliband, I predict buyer’s remorse will set in within six months, and 2010–15 will be seen as a golden age.
Julian Fellowes

Writer
It is hard for me to understand how people would consider inviting the party that took us into our worst financial crisis since the war back into power. I do not mean to imply that it was all their fault, but when Gordon Brown left Downing Street, we had a debt of £160 billion and unemployment had risen by half a million since he took office. Five years later we have turned the corner, a fact recognised across the world, and two million men and women are back in work. Surely that is an achievement we have to support and allow to continue? I’m not saying Labour has nothing to offer. They have many achievements to be proud of and there may come a time to give them another chance. But right now it is imperative not to leave this crucial job half done and at risk of sliding into reverse. Nobody prospers when the economy is in a mess.
Michael Burleigh

Historian
I have many reservations about voting for weird people in their forties who harp on about their primary/prep school (Johnson on Marr) or ‘School’ experience in general, suggesting as it does that nothing in their subsequent lives was so vivid, or that only the Etonian gene pool is fit to govern, but the prospect of a Greek-style, Venezuelan-influenced coalition of ‘progressives’ in power for the next five years should surely oblige the dumbest Brit to vote Conservative. This is not the time for self-indulgent division on the right, or for the naked ambition of Johnson (whose inadequacy as a future Tory leader was manifest in that same interview). The coalition has done a pretty good job extracting us from Labour’s hole, so it should finish the job it started. If Cameron loses, then Javid is the man.
Susan Hill

Writer
I will be voting Conservative because I believe in smaller government. Individual effort and choice linked to personal responsibility. Helping those in need who cannot — not will not — help themselves, and to which the socialist dependency culture is the wrong solution.


<a href="http://adserver.adtech.de/adlink/3.0...=300;grp=59304" target="_blank"><i mg src="http://adserver.adtech.de/adserv/3.0...=300;grp=59304" border="0" width="0" height="0"/></a>

The highest educational standards for all, not the few. Socialism betrayed several generations of young people. Only Michael Gove had the courage to grasp that nettle. The grave mistake of plucking him forcibly from the garden when he might have achieved even more was surely Cameron’s alone.
Because I am certain that letting Miliband and Labour in will send us back 20 years and bring us to our knees economically again, just as recovery is under way.
Because we absolutely must keep the SNP out of our affairs. They exist to pay attention to their own. Scotland will become independent within the next five years. That is up to them, but their interference solely for their own ends in the rest of the United Kingdom’s business will present a grave danger.
Any reservations? One. Because William Hague was the best prime minister we never had, and now never can have.
Robin Hanbury-Tenison

Explorer
Anyone looking at the UK economy dispassionately must see that it makes sense to stick with a government whose proven track record over the last five years is the envy of the world. Economic stability is what matters most at the moment. We do not need political chaos. Let the Conservatives finish the job they alone have the experience and courage to see through.

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demx9
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(Original post by AMT6)
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ChaoticButterfly
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Your dad is a noob.
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Davij038
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And there lies the problem with tactical voting. The liberals are their own ideology and will do what is best for their core liberal voters not people who'd rather vote lab or con.
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