Withengar
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Hello!

I'm from Croatia and I've been offered a place by Essex University, which is now my firm choice. I'm planning to study EPOP (Elections, Public Opinion and Parties) and I'm curious about the standing and raking of the university, the course itself and anything you can tell me about the city, people, nightlife etc.

Any and all comments are appreciated.
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dolan m
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it sucks profusely
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User1686961
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Essex have a uni?
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Withengar
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(Original post by dolan m)
it sucks profusely
(Original post by ThatGuyRik)
Essex have a uni?
If you people have nothing intelligent and/or constructive to say, simply restrain from commenting. I would really appreciate actual help and advice.
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iodo345
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There's better and there's worse. I think it's in Colchester which isn't the greatest place but just look on employment prospects to see if the course is worth it in terms of money.
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gulbenkian02
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If you like the look of the university and feel that you'll be comfortable there, then it may be a good uni for you. I think that's what really matters most, rather than league tables and reputation. Also make sure that the course is 100% right for you aswell, the most important thing is that you're happy so you can make the most out of your education. It's all subjective.

There may be people who say they don't think the area/course/uni/social life whatever is great, but you may have different views and opinions to them. If you can, try and visit. If not, take into account people's answers and make sure that no one tries to dissuade you from going there, but gives you constructive advice that's good for you.

I personally cannot say anything about it as I don't really know much about it, but if the course is good and you've researched the area/nightlife etc and think you'll be able to be there for 3/4years then it'll be good for you.
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Withengar
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(Original post by iodo345)
There's better and there's worse. I think it's in Colchester which isn't the greatest place but just look on employment
prospects to see if the course is worth it in terms of money.
Well it's says is one of the best universities in the field of Politics and Government. That's why I choose it. I'm hoping I won't regret it.
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James E Walker
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It's really not
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iodo345
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(Original post by Withengar)
Well it's says is one of the best universities in the field of Politics and Government. That's why I choose it. I'm hoping I won't regret it.
A lot of university talk is just advertising so make sure you ask any students doing the course. Other than that as long as you settle in living in England you'll be fine. Good luck.
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RhymeAsylumForever
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Honestly, Essex isn't a very good uni, you're better off going somewhere else.
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Withengar
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(Original post by RhymeAsylumForever)
Honestly, Essex isn't a very good uni, you're better off going somewhere else.
Why isn't it? I would like to know the reasons and thoughts on this, not mere claims.
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Gabbyzb95
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I have made Essex my firm choice too. I was going to apply for Kings College London but when I visited Essex on an open day I really liked the campus feel to it. I heard night life is really good there and that the philosophy department are really close knit and great. I'm looking forward too it


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midgemeister7
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(Original post by Withengar)
Well it's says is one of the best universities in the field of Politics and Government. That's why I choose it. I'm hoping I won't regret it.
League tables aren't everything but take a look here and for politics they're 23rd for politics

http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...ngs?s=Politics

So not that bad or anything but probably not 'one of the best' as they put it. They're 35ish in the normal table which if decent, so it's up to whether you like the course and the place really
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lucyfill
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I joined in 2014, and I have never felt so lonely in such a crowded and busy place. They big themselves up as every Uni does, I suppose, and make themselves look brilliant and they care so much about your education, etc. Everyone sticks to their own little group, yes its very multi-cultural but no one interacts with each other. Most are so rude. Lecturers read of off power points or sheets like robots, I've been there a year made no friends, not one of my mentors/lecturers know me personally. An idea of a night out is getting off your face, I'm not someone who doesn't drink, but this is unreal. I'm not being horrible, I'm simply giving you the truth, If i'd have known I would be elsewhere. Literally anywhere else. My exams started this week, I had NO clue what I was doing, and thats not because I haven't revised, because I've worked my arse off to keep up with the Uni's learning style, there is just no support. If I have a problem I have no idea where I should go.
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llik
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(Original post by lucyfill)
I joined in 2014, and I have never felt so lonely in such a crowded and busy place. They big themselves up as every Uni does, I suppose, and make themselves look brilliant and they care so much about your education, etc. Everyone sticks to their own little group, yes its very multi-cultural but no one interacts with each other. Most are so rude. Lecturers read of off power points or sheets like robots, I've been there a year made no friends, not one of my mentors/lecturers know me personally. An idea of a night out is getting off your face, I'm not someone who doesn't drink, but this is unreal. I'm not being horrible, I'm simply giving you the truth, If i'd have known I would be elsewhere. Literally anywhere else. My exams started this week, I had NO clue what I was doing, and thats not because I haven't revised, because I've worked my arse off to keep up with the Uni's learning style, there is just no support. If I have a problem I have no idea where I should go.

can i ask, what degree are you studying?
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vmburl
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Look, the time you have at university is what you make of it. It's a space for you to make your friends and learn and use the facilities how you see fit.

I am a graduate from the university of Essex and each year I spent there was completely different. I also got in through clearing so I kinda resented it for my first year.

The campus is small. Some people will love the closeness and community feel of that, some people will feel claustrophobic. It's quite green and has a couple of lakes and picnic benches where people have bbqs in the summer. That's nice. It also has big squares where everyone will tend to gather in summer times. The buildings are ugly, there's no denying that. They were designed by a guy who designed prisons. But let's just LOL at that.

It's not that close to the town. But that never bothered me. Easy enough to get a bus. It is close to wivenhoe which is a nice little place to wonder around.

In my first year I felt quite lonely, but I didn't join any societies and I had a boyfriend at the university of bath who I went to see a lot. I didn't socialise by going to the tower or flat parties. But my flat mates were still lovely (2 Cypriot girls who DID talk to me - and hid presents and balloons in my kitchen cupboards for my birthday) and I made a few friends on my course and at freshers who I am still friends with now. Just happened none of them were the going out kind. The majority of my friends in third year were Norwegians. So the different nationalities do mix.

Music in the club is ****. But it's only three years and when you're drunk and having fun with friends, who cares. Go to London and watch a live band there. Sometimes people will play music in the squares and if you're lucky you'll find some decent acts at the lakeside theatre. Including comedians. I didn't discover the lakeside theatre until my last year.

It's not great for sports. Facility-wise, number-wise, and variety-wise. But you can find something you'll be happy to join. They have a lot of gym classes that are quite good.

Some lecturers read off the slides and make you wonder why you turned up, some are great. It's the same at any university. I thought the psychology department was great and very supportive. Can't comment on others departments.

Honestly, your time at uni is what you make of it. Have fun. Be sociable. Don't sweat over the small stuff. Three years go by quickly and you'll miss it once it's over.
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lewif002
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(Original post by vmburl)
Look, the time you have at university is what you make of it. It's a space for you to make your friends and learn and use the facilities how you see fit.

I am a graduate from the university of Essex and each year I spent there was completely different. I also got in through clearing so I kinda resented it for my first year.

The campus is small. Some people will love the closeness and community feel of that, some people will feel claustrophobic. It's quite green and has a couple of lakes and picnic benches where people have bbqs in the summer. That's nice. It also has big squares where everyone will tend to gather in summer times. The buildings are ugly, there's no denying that. They were designed by a guy who designed prisons. But let's just LOL at that.

It's not that close to the town. But that never bothered me. Easy enough to get a bus. It is close to wivenhoe which is a nice little place to wonder around.

In my first year I felt quite lonely, but I didn't join any societies and I had a boyfriend at the university of bath who I went to see a lot. I didn't socialise by going to the tower or flat parties. But my flat mates were still lovely (2 Cypriot girls who DID talk to me - and hid presents and balloons in my kitchen cupboards for my birthday) and I made a few friends on my course and at freshers who I am still friends with now. Just happened none of them were the going out kind. The majority of my friends in third year were Norwegians. So the different nationalities do mix.

Music in the club is ****. But it's only three years and when you're drunk and having fun with friends, who cares. Go to London and watch a live band there. Sometimes people will play music in the squares and if you're lucky you'll find some decent acts at the lakeside theatre. Including comedians. I didn't discover the lakeside theatre until my last year.

It's not great for sports. Facility-wise, number-wise, and variety-wise. But you can find something you'll be happy to join. They have a lot of gym classes that are quite good.

Some lecturers read off the slides and make you wonder why you turned up, some are great. It's the same at any university. I thought the psychology department was great and very supportive. Can't comment on others departments.

Honestly, your time at uni is what you make of it. Have fun. Be sociable. Don't sweat over the small stuff. Three years go by quickly and you'll miss it once it's over.
How did you, personally, find the transition from student life to working life? Was it hard or are you a natural born hard worker?

I hate working a set routine where I can't have my own free-time and decide what I'm doing and when I'm doing.


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vmburl
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Sorry for taking so long to reply.

The transition was pretty hard to be honest. It wasn't so much the working life that was hard to adjust to but the demoralising task of finding a job, and also losing independence by moving back home. What didn't help is that I did a fantastic placement in Sri Lanka for 3 months with a company called SLVolunteers, straight after I graduated, so it hit me hard when I had to come back to reality and start job hunting. And with sitting around having nothing to do but fill out job applications, I was pretty grateful to have a set routine when I got a job.

I guess I am quite a hard worker in general, but also I work at a school so the hours aren't too taxing
Yeah I know what you mean about not being able to decide what and when you're doing things, but you'll learn to fit them around work and I guess it's all part of adult life. Don't feel you have to rush into getting a serious job straight away, maybe make the transition easier by doing something which is more shift work so you still have part freedom.
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lewif002
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(Original post by vmburl)
Sorry for taking so long to reply.

The transition was pretty hard to be honest. It wasn't so much the working life that was hard to adjust to but the demoralising task of finding a job, and also losing independence by moving back home. What didn't help is that I did a fantastic placement in Sri Lanka for 3 months with a company called SLVolunteers, straight after I graduated, so it hit me hard when I had to come back to reality and start job hunting. And with sitting around having nothing to do but fill out job applications, I was pretty grateful to have a set routine when I got a job.

I guess I am quite a hard worker in general, but also I work at a school so the hours aren't too taxing
Yeah I know what you mean about not being able to decide what and when you're doing things, but you'll learn to fit them around work and I guess it's all part of adult life. Don't feel you have to rush into getting a serious job straight away, maybe make the transition easier by doing something which is more shift work so you still have part freedom.
Thanks for your reply!! And, like wise, apologies for my super late reply.

Wow the Sri Lanka work sounds awesome! I bet that was and eye opener.

Would you, personally, recommend university to someone who is already in a 'serious' job?
I work Mon-Fri as an Engineer. Will earn 40k per year after being fully qualified and getting more experience. Will probably hit 40k when I'm about 30. I'm currently 19. The company is ok/decent.

I want to go to university as I feel I have missed a chapter of my life. I missed making loads of friends, I missed all the nightclubbing, I missed the independence and learning how to cook, clean & live on my own.

My question is, regardless of the degree in question or how well I do, would you recommend going to uni, quitting a job, and getting in debt, in order to spend 4 years at uni of Essex (foundation course). I'm hugely worried. I am depressed at work, lonely, bored, repetitive. However, I feel uni will be great for the first year (or 2 in my case) and then slump again as I realise I have to put in huge amounts of work and prepare myself for work, although perhaps by then (22/23) I will be ready for work.


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DIN-NARYU-FARORE
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its ****ing terrible
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