The Student Room Group

LSE (Finance & Economics) or Imperial (Finance) or RSM (Finance & Investments)

Hi everyone :smile:

I am new to the forum and looking for some opinions regarding my course choice for an MSc next year.

Some background info:
1. BSc Econometrics & Operational Research, Tilburg University (among top 5% of students)
2. No real working experience
3. GMAT: 740
4. Intend to go into strategy consulting or banking (other options are also open) in The Netherlands
5. Might do MBA in 4-5 years in Europe or US, when working for a consulting firm

I have received offers from:
LSE - MSc Finance and Economics (25k)
Imperial College London Business School - MSc Finance (30k)
Rotterdam School of Management (RSM) - MSc Finance & Investments (2k)

I have also been admitted to:
Erasmus University Rotterdam - MSc Quantitative Finance (2k)
Tilburg University - MSc Quantitative Finance and Actuarial Sciences (2k)

Given my background and ambitions, I appreciate if you can give your opinions and advice what would be the best option (program, reputation, costs..).

Thanks for any feedback! :biggrin:
(edited 8 years ago)
Reply 1
I am still looking for some advice :smile:

I find it a tough choice. The LSE program seems to be pretty quantitative and theoretical. On the LSE website it states that most students describe it as 'the hardest thing they have even done'... About 1 out of 20 applicants got selected (class size of around 50)

Imperial seems to be a bit more practical (although much more quantitative than many other 'finance' courses). I truly love some of the electives they offer :biggrin:. I have no information about the acceptance rate. Does anyone know if and where this can be found? I need to respond before 3 June...

Any information is welcome :wink:
I wouldn't care that much about the acceptance rate. When it comes to LSE, there are many people who apply, then they are accepted, but then they're not taking a place. 25k it's loads, and not many people go for it, and thus, this results in the acceptance rate super small. Similar for the Imperial.
When it comes to unis, it's really hard to say, but from my experience employees value international experience, and therefore, if I were you, I'd go for Masters in the UK. Both LSE and Imperial are really good for starting a career in Finance, so I guess it's just a matter which one you prefer. LSE has a longer tradition of putting students into Finance, however, Imperial is getting better and better at this.
Hi, I graduate from LSE F&E. Do let me know if you have questions. I would just say to be prepared for very high level quantitative and theoretical maths and finance in this course.
Original post by HelicopterBen
Hi, I graduate from LSE F&E. Do let me know if you have questions. I would just say to be prepared for very high level quantitative and theoretical maths and finance in this course.



Hi HelicopterBen

I saw in a thread that you were about to graduate from the LSE program in Finance & Economics (MSc). I'm a prospective applicant and am hoping to study the course in September 2017 so it would be great to ask a few questions knowing that you have gone through the program
Reply 5
Hi, tough choice if you plan is on staying in the Netherlands than RSM or ESE is the top place to go. LSE is also a great option, if you want to put an international school on your CV, but it will be much more costly...
At the end, it is your decision based on what you want and your "master experience".
Good luck :smile:
Original post by Any800
Hi, tough choice if you plan is on staying in the Netherlands than RSM or ESE is the top place to go. LSE is also a great option, if you want to put an international school on your CV, but it will be much more costly...
At the end, it is your decision based on what you want and your "master experience".
Good luck :smile:

The thread is 6 years old....
Reply 7
For future applicants :smile:
Original post by Mr Simpson
Hi everyone :smile:

I am new to the forum and looking for some opinions regarding my course choice for an MSc next year.

Some background info:
1. BSc Econometrics & Operational Research, Tilburg University (among top 5% of students)
2. No real working experience
3. GMAT: 740
4. Intend to go into strategy consulting or banking (other options are also open) in The Netherlands
5. Might do MBA in 4-5 years in Europe or US, when working for a consulting firm

I have received offers from:
LSE - MSc Finance and Economics (25k)
Imperial College London Business School - MSc Finance (30k)
Rotterdam School of Management (RSM) - MSc Finance & Investments (2k)

I have also been admitted to:
Erasmus University Rotterdam - MSc Quantitative Finance (2k)
Tilburg University - MSc Quantitative Finance and Actuarial Sciences (2k)

Given my background and ambitions, I appreciate if you can give your opinions and advice what would be the best option (program, reputation, costs..).

Thanks for any feedback! :biggrin:

I'm a finance major completing my undergrad at Boston University who is planning to apply to one of the UCL MSc Finance Programs for the upcoming August semester. I was told by the admissions team I can only apply to two programs for UCL at a time, and there are currently 4 programs that interest me. They are Venture Capital and Private Equity with Financial Technology MSc, Infrastructure Investment and Finance MSc, Banking and Digital Finance MSc, and a general Finance MSc. As someone who doesn't meet the minimum GPA requirements for UCL, I was wondering which programs out of these are the least competitive so that I can boost my chances of acceptance. I originally wanted to do a General Finance MSc but I think that might be too popular
Original post by ThestudentofBU
I'm a finance major completing my undergrad at Boston University who is planning to apply to one of the UCL MSc Finance Programs for the upcoming August semester. I was told by the admissions team I can only apply to two programs for UCL at a time, and there are currently 4 programs that interest me. They are Venture Capital and Private Equity with Financial Technology MSc, Infrastructure Investment and Finance MSc, Banking and Digital Finance MSc, and a general Finance MSc. As someone who doesn't meet the minimum GPA requirements for UCL, I was wondering which programs out of these are the least competitive so that I can boost my chances of acceptance. I originally wanted to do a General Finance MSc but I think that might be too popular

Stop spamming the same question in lots of unrelated threads. Not only is this thread over half a decade old, but it's evidently about comparing courses at LSE, Imperial and RSM, not UCL.

Just post your question in a new thread and wait. If nobody replies then spamming your question all over the forum isn't going to change anything.

Quick Reply

Latest