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    Hi everyone

    I am new to the forum and looking for some opinions regarding my course choice for an MSc next year.

    Some background info:
    1. BSc Econometrics & Operational Research, Tilburg University (among top 5% of students)
    2. No real working experience
    3. GMAT: 740
    4. Intend to go into strategy consulting or banking (other options are also open) in The Netherlands
    5. Might do MBA in 4-5 years in Europe or US, when working for a consulting firm

    I have received offers from:
    LSE - MSc Finance and Economics (25k)
    Imperial College London Business School - MSc Finance (30k)
    Rotterdam School of Management (RSM) - MSc Finance & Investments (2k)

    I have also been admitted to:
    Erasmus University Rotterdam - MSc Quantitative Finance (2k)
    Tilburg University - MSc Quantitative Finance and Actuarial Sciences (2k)

    Given my background and ambitions, I appreciate if you can give your opinions and advice what would be the best option (program, reputation, costs..).

    Thanks for any feedback!
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    I am still looking for some advice

    I find it a tough choice. The LSE program seems to be pretty quantitative and theoretical. On the LSE website it states that most students describe it as 'the hardest thing they have even done'... About 1 out of 20 applicants got selected (class size of around 50)

    Imperial seems to be a bit more practical (although much more quantitative than many other 'finance' courses). I truly love some of the electives they offer . I have no information about the acceptance rate. Does anyone know if and where this can be found? I need to respond before 3 June...

    Any information is welcome
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    I wouldn't care that much about the acceptance rate. When it comes to LSE, there are many people who apply, then they are accepted, but then they're not taking a place. 25k it's loads, and not many people go for it, and thus, this results in the acceptance rate super small. Similar for the Imperial.
    When it comes to unis, it's really hard to say, but from my experience employees value international experience, and therefore, if I were you, I'd go for Masters in the UK. Both LSE and Imperial are really good for starting a career in Finance, so I guess it's just a matter which one you prefer. LSE has a longer tradition of putting students into Finance, however, Imperial is getting better and better at this.
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    Hi, I graduate from LSE F&E. Do let me know if you have questions. I would just say to be prepared for very high level quantitative and theoretical maths and finance in this course.
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    (Original post by HelicopterBen)
    Hi, I graduate from LSE F&E. Do let me know if you have questions. I would just say to be prepared for very high level quantitative and theoretical maths and finance in this course.

    Hi HelicopterBen

    I saw in a thread that you were about to graduate from the LSE program in Finance & Economics (MSc). I'm a prospective applicant and am hoping to study the course in September 2017 so it would be great to ask a few questions knowing that you have gone through the program
 
 
 

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