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What are the Tories' real plans for the NHS? watch

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    It goes without saying that talk of altering the NHS is pretty much a social taboo in the UK. Following this election, many seem to think that the NHS will be further privitised under the Tories. It's difficult to get an unbiased prediction on this so that's what I'm hoping for.

    What are the Tories' long-term plans for the health service? And what is so bad about alternative health services like Germany's? Shouldn't there be an open dialogue with the public about what options government has in mind for reforming the NHS to provide a more efficient service for patients?
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    I'm a third year med student in Scotland, and I for one would welcome some form of privatisation in the NHS. Our NHS is fully governed by Hollyrood and the current format just isn't working. There has been no increase in funding, no new clinical staff or nurses, yet every week there are new executives and area site coordinators (which btw I have no idea what they do). 100 private beds in a 3000 bed hospital would have an effect on admission and would provide additional funds for more nurses and more research as current research grants are funded by change down the back of the sofa
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    (Original post by Bioboy91)
    I'm a third year med student in Scotland, and I for one would welcome some form of privatisation in the NHS. Our NHS is fully governed by Hollyrood and the current format just isn't working. There has been no increase in funding, no new clinical staff or nurses, yet every week there are new executives and area site coordinators (which btw I have no idea what they do). 100 private beds in a 3000 bed hospital would have an effect on admission and would provide additional funds for more nurses and more research as current research grants are funded by change down the back of the sofa
    It's interesting to get a rare unbiased opinion on the NHS. Many seem scared to even suggest any sort of privatisation. Would I be right in thinking that privatisation seems even less likely in Scotland though, where the SNP are committed to restoring the service to a fully public service?
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    There will be no privatisation under the SNP which I think is very backwards thinking. Everyone sees the word privatisation and panics. But the problem really is that people don't understand how the NHS works (and that includes the people in charge). As it stands there is no income from the NHS so its just a drain on resources but with the money coming from private patients there would be a source of revenue for extra staff and resources. We are running in survival mode where its a case of "it kind of works in this budget and time frame so we'll just stick with it" instead of "how can we improve this practise to save staff and time allowing them to deal with other"
    I'm a great believer that the only way to improve hospital care and wait times is to reform GP surgery so theres no more Monday to Friday 9 till 5
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    You only need to look at private healthcare in America to see the disaster of private health care costing 10 times more than the NHS, which is privatised already.
    Google PFI deals and performance related fines.

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    Putting 8 billion public expenditure into the NHS is hardly privatisation. Imo i'd like them to introduce reimbursement if private contracts make a 5%+ profit but other than that i'd say if private contracts can do better and cheaper than why should people wait?
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    (Original post by americandragon)
    It's interesting to get a rare unbiased opinion on the NHS. Many seem scared to even suggest any sort of privatisation. Would I be right in thinking that privatisation seems even less likely in Scotland though, where the SNP are committed to restoring the service to a fully public service?
    Are you aware that the SNP have failed to match the spending increases on NHS Scotland that we've seen south of the border.

    It depends on whether or not restoring it to a fully public service benefits the patients or the staff.

    Although I fully agree with your points.

    a serious debate is needed on the NHS throughout the UK.

    The European healthcare model seems to work rather well and seems to be the route the Americans are going down.
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    (Original post by si82)
    You only need to look at private healthcare in America to see the disaster of private health care costing 10 times more than the NHS, which is privatised already.
    Google PFI deals and performance related fines.

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    Why have you chosen to compare to the American model and not the European model?
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    (Original post by whorace)
    Putting 8 billion public expenditure into the NHS is hardly privatisation. Imo i'd like them to introduce reimbursement if private contracts make a 5%+ profit but other than that i'd say if private contracts can do better and cheaper than why should people wait?
    The invisible problem with all this is that the private sector are only taking on 'better and cheaper' contracts because they're able to cherry pick what they take. If the NHS only offered high-yield profitable services then it wouldn't be in the red. The problem with allowing private companies to take all of the services where the money lies is that said money used to help the NHS break even. The profitable parts of a service would cover for the money-losing parts. So now the profitable parts are being taken away to private tender because obviously private companies offer it for cheaper (given they have no less profitable parts to compensate for), and the NHS is shafted with all that remains.

    Unfortunately, under the current system of payment, that's how it works. To give an example, follow-up patients are worth 'less' than new patients in terms of how much you get paid from the central pot per consultation. So if you do one-stop things where you see new patients who need zero follow-up, you're quids in and can make plenty of cash. If you see complex patients who need long-term monitoring because of their problems, you're not. This would be fine except the health service has a duty to all people - whether their issues are simple or not. Now CCGs commission private companies to do all of the quick and easy bits and it's damaging the ability of hospital departments to keep their heads above water.
 
 
 

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