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Should 16 /17 year old's be allowed to vote? watch

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    Those in the 16-17 year age range are going to be effected just as much by another 5 years of the Tory government, especially because of what has happened the past five years with student loans, tuition fee's, and the unemployment rates for young people. By the time the next election comes the 16/17 year old's that couldn't vote this election will be in their 20's and starting adult life and the way they start that really does depend on ho the next 5 years will be run.

    So should 16/17 year's have been able to vote?
    Should the age be lowered to 16?

    I'm really interested on others peoples views because I am about to turn 17 and I was highly annoyed that considering how much of a mess the conservative's made the past 5 years that I will have to live with more mistakes on their half without even getting a say.

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    In my opinion, no. I am in this category and fully understand the argument that you should have a taste of real life, of real work etc before you should be voting. I think you should have been "out into the big bad world" before you can vote
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    (Original post by balanced)
    In my opinion, no. I am in this category and fully understand the argument that you should have a taste of real life, of real work etc before you should be voting. I think you should have been "out into the big bad world" before you can vote
    But what about those who have already been though things that most adults have or those who will be the most greatly effected by some changed the governments promises like those ho are carers, disabled, those who grew up in the care system? They get greatly effected every election.
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    No.
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    (Original post by holly1798)
    Those in the 16-17 year age range are going to be effected just as much by another 5 years of the Tory government, especially because of what has happened the past five years with student loans, tuition fee's, and the unemployment rates for young people. By the time the next election comes the 16/17 year old's that couldn't vote this election will be in their 20's and starting adult life and the way they start that really does depend on ho the next 5 years will be run.

    So should 16/17 year's have been able to vote?
    Should the age be lowered to 16?

    I'm really interested on others peoples views because I am about to turn 17 and I was highly annoyed that considering how much of a mess the conservative's made the past 5 years that I will have to live with more mistakes on their half without even getting a say.

    An argument that 16-17 year olds will be effected by another five years of Tory rule is flawed. Everyone is effected by government. That's not a reason to give an 8 year old the vote, is it?

    Yes, there are 16-17 year olds who are politically engaged; that much was demonstrated during the independence referendum last year. However, I don't believe they should be given the vote. In my opinion, a 16 or 17 year old doesn't have enough life experience about them to properly make a reasoned decision at an election.
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    (Original post by americandragon)
    An argument that 16-17 year olds will be effected by another five years of Tory rule is flawed. Everyone is effected by government. That's not a reason to give an 8 year old the vote, is it?

    Yes, there are 16-17 year olds who are politically engaged; that much was demonstrated during the independence referendum last year. However, I don't believe they should be given the vote. In my opinion, a 16 or 17 year old doesn't have enough life experience about them to properly make a reasoned decision at an election.
    An 8 year old isn't go to be as effected by as much as those young adults are. Childcare, the NHS maybe that much. 8 year olds aren't politicly aware, a surprising number number of 16 and 17 year old's are. At least if 16 year old's get the vote then those who want to vote can vote, there are some 16 year old's that more more switched on by adults and then the option to vote is there, doesn't mean they have to use it.

    16 year olds were given a vote during the scottish referendum
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    (Original post by holly1798)
    But what about those who have already been though things that most adults have or those who will be the most greatly effected by some changed the governments promises like those ho are carers, disabled, those who grew up in the care system? They get greatly effected every election.
    There aren't enough, and overall it wouldn't be good for those who are vulnerable I think. I agree with your reasoning, but would it work? I don't think so, they are a minority who would be drowned out by other under 18s etc
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    Tricky argument because some 16/17 year olds are far more educated politically than adults who are eligible to vote. And yes, the next few years of our lives are affected by election results.
    However, we have had very little experience of being a part of the economy and the 'real world'. As we don't pay tax, do we have a right to say what other people's money does?
    But then again there are people who don't pay tax, or pay very little tax, who are eligible to vote.
    There is a danger than 16/17 year olds can be naive about economic matters but overall, I think our opinion is important as we are getting to the stage where political decisions have a major impact on our lives.


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    I think they should vote. They will become adults during the term they would vote for and will therefore be affected by a lot of the policies that are implemented. Policitians aren't really accountable to young people so they can introduce a lot of policies to screw them over. For example, I don't think its fair that politicians can increase tuition fees when they're only elected by people who won't have to pay them.

    I also don't agree with the argument that 16/17 don't know enough about politics. Maybe they don't, but I think a lot of that is because they don't have to because they can't vote at the moment anyway. I imagine a lot of them would read up a bit more when it came to their first election.
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    (Original post by DarkMagic)
    I think they should vote. They will become adults during the term they would vote for and will therefore be affected by a lot of the policies that are implemented. Policitians aren't really accountable to young people so they can introduce a lot of policies to screw them over. For example, I don't think its fair that politicians can increase tuition fees when they're only elected by people who won't have to pay them.

    I also don't agree with the argument that 16/17 don't know enough about politics. Maybe they don't, but I think a lot of that is because they don't have to because they can't vote at the moment anyway. I imagine a lot of them would read up a bit more when it came to their first election.
    I totally agree with you. A lot of 16 and 17 year olds are more clued up about politics than a lot of 18+ as well.
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    There is no need for this.
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    Yes. Read something really interesting somewhere but can't find it now, went along the lines of: 16+ year olds should be able to vote whilst 65+ year olds shouldn't be able to- because whilst the former are voting for their future the latter are not.
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    (Original post by skd1996)
    Yes. Read something really interesting somewhere but can't find it now, went along the lines of: 16+ year olds should be able to vote whilst 65+ year olds shouldn't be able to- because whilst the former are voting for their future the latter are not.
    I'm not quite sure where I stand on the 65+ year olds not being able to vote. Some elderly live till they are into their 90's and their 100's so they will still have a lot of election to go though and elderly care is becoming more of a campaign focus for a lot of parties...I really don't know how to feel about that concept
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    (Original post by DarkMagic)
    I think they should vote. They will become adults during the term they would vote for and will therefore be affected by a lot of the policies that are implemented. Policitians aren't really accountable to young people so they can introduce a lot of policies to screw them over. For example, I don't think its fair that politicians can increase tuition fees when they're only elected by people who won't have to pay them.

    I also don't agree with the argument that 16/17 don't know enough about politics. Maybe they don't, but I think a lot of that is because they don't have to because they can't vote at the moment anyway. I imagine a lot of them would read up a bit more when it came to their first election.
    Exactly the way that I feel about this! Not just when it comes to University either but things like the 'help to buy' scheme if any of us want to come to own property in the future. This age group at the moment is going to be so highly effected by the changes that Cameron will probably make, and we had to let everyone else vote for our futures even though we are practically adults.
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    No, I'm also 16 years old who's going to turn 17 soon, but I think we shouldn't be able to vote now, because I think there are more numbers of immature people our age compared to the mature ones...so no. Coz they might ruin our lives even more. You should take into account that 16-17 year olds across the WHOLE country will be able to vote. And that can put us in real deep ish if they all decided to vote and especially if they weren't interested in voting and only voted because they think it's cool or something. :facepalm::nothing:
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    (Original post by CrystalMath101)
    No, I'm also 16 years old who's going to turn 17 soon, but I think we shouldn't be able to vote now, because I think there are more numbers of immature people our age compared to the mature ones...so no. Coz they might ruin our lives even more. You should take into account that 16-17 year olds across the WHOLE country will be able to vote. And that can put us in real deep ish if they all decided to vote and especially if they weren't interested in voting and only voted because they think it's cool or something. :facepalm::nothing:
    There maybe people are age who are immature or don't care about the election, but those who do care should still have the option. Even those who are immature I think would take it seriously just like 16 year olds did in the Scottish referendum, if they didn't then they simply wouldn't vote. If 16 year olds have the option they may pay attention and look things up. 18 year olds don't always vote when they can, it's still matter of choice. A lot of 16 year olds are incredibly switch on when it comes to politics, even when it just comes down to knowing the basics, they are still able to come to their own view.
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    (Original post by holly1798)
    There maybe people are age who are immature or don't care about the election, but those who do care should still have the option. Even those who are immature I think would take it seriously just like 16 year olds did in the Scottish referendum, if they didn't then they simply wouldn't vote. If 16 year olds have the option they may pay attention and look things up. 18 year olds don't always vote when they can, it's still matter of choice. A lot of 16 year olds are incredibly switch on when it comes to politics, even when it just comes down to knowing the basics, they are still able to come to their own view.
    This may be true with your neighbourhood and freinds, but from what I've seen in the people around me is that this would be a BAD idea...
    Every single vote counts, so if one was to be immature about it and put in some random vote then that could possibly change our future for the better or for the worse
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    (Original post by CrystalMath101)
    This may be true with your neighbourhood and freinds, but from what I've seen in the people around me is that this would be a BAD idea...
    Every single vote counts, so if one was to be immature about it and put in some random vote then that could possibly change our future for the better or for the worse
    It isn't really true about my neighbourhood or friends either. I know one friend who was interested vocally as I was in the election and they are a long distance friend. My friends to my knowledge have quite average views for my Labour focused town, they all support Labour. Your town may not be but one place doesn't speak for the whole country anyway. I know a lot more people would be up for the 16 year old vote rather than those who wouldn't. If they vote for some random vote that is their problem. One immature 16 year old on won'y outway the 100's of mature ones who have come to an informed decision. People don't take this stuff lightly anyway. The referendum is a prime example, once again.
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    One immature 16 year old on won'y outway the 100's of mature ones
    That is your opinion on how many of the mature to immature ratio there may be...what we need here are facts. Plus we can't just assume that people who are immature won't vote...I'm sorry but people shouldn't base stuff on opinions. We need to look at this from an informed and factual point of view. There's still more to life we need to see before being able to vote. Anyway most of the policies given by the political parties are aimed at families anyway, as they're the ones that make up most of the population that vote. And parents only want the best for their children.
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    (Original post by CrystalMath101)
    That is your opinion on how many of the mature to immature ratio there may be...what we need here are facts. Plus we can't just assume that people who are immature won't vote...I'm sorry but people shouldn't base stuff on opinions. We need to look at this from an informed and factual point of view. There's still more to life we need to see before being able to vote. Anyway most of the policies given by the political parties are aimed at families anyway, as they're the ones that make up most of the population that vote. And parents only want the best for their children.
    I think you will find that it effect individuals just as much. Students tuition fees, NHS care, childcare (since a lot of people 16/17 do have children), unemployment, buying houses. It will all effect us in the next 5 years or even effecting us right now. People who are uninformed will feel the need to educate themselves, and if they don't they may exercise thier right not to vote and that is their choice. If people didn't base things on what people opinions and thoughts are on the situation then no one would be anywhere.
 
 
 

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