Turn on thread page Beta

Best depression supplement? watch

    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Been struggling with this for a while. Nothing seems to make me happy except getting blind drunk and receiving female validation which ironically leads me to waking up the next morning hangover with a total loss of appetite.

    Therapy takes at least 3 months to get an appointment and i've been let down by the girl i was supposed to be meeting up with tonight (£60 wasted) and my mates are too busy also. I don't wanna go on meds just something that will keep me driving into a ****ing tree!
    Any ideas please?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Try exercising. Join a gym or simply just go for a jog. As you probably already know, exercise releases endorphins which will help make you feel 'happier'
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Therapy doesn't take 'at least 3 months' to get an appointment. It takes about a month. I've done it. Go to your GP, get a referral, start CBT therapy, put in the effort and time (no quick fixes for this). Antidepressants won't be a long-term solution (or even a quick fix) - they usually take about 3 weeks to see any results, come with unpleasant side-effects that often outweigh the positives and the effects aren't life-changing. CBT will help you to take control of your life and mind and be proactiv.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    5 HTP
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I know that St Johns Wort is a herbal alternative to anti depressants- available to purchase in basically every UK pharmacy/Holland and Barrette. But I would advise you speak to a professional first.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by godivaontherocks)
    Therapy doesn't take 'at least 3 months' to get an appointment. It takes about a month. I've done it. Go to your GP, get a referral, start CBT therapy, put in the effort and time (no quick fixes for this).
    Good for you but 3months (never mind 1 month!) is very much at the lower end of the scale for getting a CBT appointment in the UK. Like most NHS services it's vastly oversubscribed.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Good for you but 3months (never mind 1 month!) is very much at the lower end of the scale for getting a CBT appointment in the UK. Like most NHS services it's vastly oversubscribed.
    If you're truly desperate to fix your situation, you will try everything and give anything a go. That includes putting in the effort and time required for treatment and being patient. No quick fixes I'm afraid. It's a mental health condition and that doesn't disappear like magic. Even antidepressants won't work that way. If it was anxiety, beta-blockers would be a different story. Yes, I am aware that there are many issues with the mental health services in the UK. Like I said, I've been there.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by godivaontherocks)
    If you're truly desperate to fix your situation, you will try everything and give anything a go. That includes putting in the effort and time required for treatment and being patient. No quick fixes I'm afraid. It's a mental health condition and that doesn't disappear like magic. Even antidepressants won't work that way. If it was anxiety, beta-blockers would be a different story. Yes, I am aware that there are many issues with the mental health services in the UK. Like I said, I've been there.
    I'm not arguing against putting effort in, I'm just saying don't give the guy false hope about how quickly he can get started with CBT.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I'm not arguing against putting effort in, I'm just saying don't give the guy false hope about how quickly he can get started with CBT.
    You're getting the wrong idea. I'm not trying to convince him that CBT will happen quickly. If anything, I have been telling him that there are no quick fixes. The best thing he can do is take control and get things started. Go to his GP and get a referral as soon as possible. Yes, there is a waiting time (I've not denied that) but there aren't many other options on the NHS unless he chooses drugs.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by godivaontherocks)
    You're getting the wrong idea. I'm not trying to convince him that CBT will happen quickly. If anything, I have been telling him that there are no quick fixes. The best thing he can do is take control and get things started. Go to his GP and get a referral as soon as possible. Yes, there is a waiting time (I've not denied that) but there aren't many other options on the NHS unless he chooses drugs.
    You said:

    Therapy doesn't take 'at least 3 months' to get an appointment. It takes about a month.
    I pointed out that 1 month is exceptional and even 3 months would be pretty damn fast given the length of waiting lists.

    I made no comment about the work or time it takes once he actually gets to the top of the waiting list.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by godivaontherocks)
    Therapy doesn't take 'at least 3 months' to get an appointment. It takes about a month. I've done it. Go to your GP, get a referral, start CBT therapy, put in the effort and time (no quick fixes for this). Antidepressants won't be a long-term solution (or even a quick fix) - they usually take about 3 weeks to see any results, come with unpleasant side-effects that often outweigh the positives and the effects aren't life-changing. CBT will help you to take control of your life and mind and be proactiv.
    I call bull**** on:
    - CBT taking about a month to start up, unless maybe if you're related to royalty.
    - CBT necessarily being the answer anyway - yes it helps a lot of people, but just like antidepressants different therapies work for different people. I've tried a bit of CBT, bit of mindfulness, both of which were helpful, but looking back and having researched it, it's DBT that probably would have been most appropriate for me. Also sometimes even professionals will say a person's too ill to start therapy, and they need other interventions first.
    - antidepressants not being a solution. They are not the solution (as above, different strokes for different folks), but they can help immeasurably when you're in the pits of depression. They really can be life-changing, or even life-saving (taking myself as a very good example. Would not be here without my meds, end of).
    - your attitude. :teehee: Having 'been there' doesn't mean you know everything, or that you have the right to dictate treatment options to other people. Advice = great. Experience = great. Telling people effectively that they're not making enough effort to get better and that they can conjure up CBT within a month = kinda sucky.




    OP, I wrote this post for someone else a while ago, hopefully it'll be relevant to you too :

    I think a combination of a number of things helped me (for the most part) get rid of my depression. Originally it was a combination of antidepressants and antipsychotics (prescribed to augment the effects of the antidepressants, as I'd run through half the AD list already ) that gave me a proper lift out of my situation. I doubt I'd be here without them.

    What kept me on the level (despite some major wobbly points), was basically a total lifestyle overhaul. Eating properly, purposeful activity (I do a lot of arts and crafts, and also some volunteering), working towards proper goals (I'll be heading back to uni this September as part of pursuing my career goal of helping other people with mental health problems), getting rid of poisonous friends and growing closer to the proper ones who're willing to stand by me through the tough times...

    All of which probably sounds like hard work, and it was/still is to an extent. But trust me, once you start seeing the payoff in your mood and energy levels, it's a lot better than sitting at home doing nothing (which I very much used to do, and it took a real effort to break the cycle of inactivity). You don't have to change your life all at once, you can take baby steps towards making yourself happier, but I think the key thing is to have definite, attainable goals. Don't beat yourself up if they're harder to reach than you'd hoped - just find a midway point to aim for instead, and then once you're there you can work on the harder challenges.

    Also, prioritise! The things that matter the most to me are: friends, family, hobbies and having a meaningful job. If something comes up that's stressing me out, I'll have a think about whether it's really that important, get help from someone, or if I should just walk away from the situation. If it's stressful and not related to what you value in life, you can probably do without it.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    You said:



    I pointed out that 1 month is exceptional and even 3 months would be pretty damn fast given the length of waiting lists.

    I made no comment about the work or time it takes once he actually gets to the top of the waiting list.
    One month is not exceptional for CBT at an IAPT centre. I waited one month exactly. No one waits three months anymore. I don't know where you live in the UK but every person I have known to have undergone this treatment with IAPT in the last 2 years has had to wait no more than one month. The waiting time for CBT treatment has been reduced over the last two years. Be aware that I am talking about CBT treatment only, not any other form of counselling.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by superwolf)
    I call bull**** on:
    - CBT taking about a month to start up, unless maybe if you're related to royalty.
    - CBT necessarily being the answer anyway - yes it helps a lot of people, but just like antidepressants different therapies work for different people. I've tried a bit of CBT, bit of mindfulness, both of which were helpful, but looking back and having researched it, it's DBT that probably would have been most appropriate for me. Also sometimes even professionals will say a person's too ill to start therapy, and they need other interventions first.
    - antidepressants not being a solution. They are not the solution (as above, different strokes for different folks), but they can help immeasurably when you're in the pits of depression. They really can be life-changing, or even life-saving (taking myself as a very good example. Would not be here without my meds, end of).
    - your attitude. :teehee: Having 'been there' doesn't mean you know everything, or that you have the right to dictate treatment options to other people. Advice = great. Experience = great. Telling people effectively that they're not making enough effort to get better and that they can conjure up CBT within a month = kinda sucky.




    OP, I wrote this post for someone else a while ago, hopefully it'll be relevant to you too :

    I think a combination of a number of things helped me (for the most part) get rid of my depression. Originally it was a combination of antidepressants and antipsychotics (prescribed to augment the effects of the antidepressants, as I'd run through half the AD list already ) that gave me a proper lift out of my situation. I doubt I'd be here without them.

    What kept me on the level (despite some major wobbly points), was basically a total lifestyle overhaul. Eating properly, purposeful activity (I do a lot of arts and crafts, and also some volunteering), working towards proper goals (I'll be heading back to uni this September as part of pursuing my career goal of helping other people with mental health problems), getting rid of poisonous friends and growing closer to the proper ones who're willing to stand by me through the tough times...

    All of which probably sounds like hard work, and it was/still is to an extent. But trust me, once you start seeing the payoff in your mood and energy levels, it's a lot better than sitting at home doing nothing (which I very much used to do, and it took a real effort to break the cycle of inactivity). You don't have to change your life all at once, you can take baby steps towards making yourself happier, but I think the key thing is to have definite, attainable goals. Don't beat yourself up if they're harder to reach than you'd hoped - just find a midway point to aim for instead, and then once you're there you can work on the harder challenges.

    Also, prioritise! The things that matter the most to me are: friends, family, hobbies and having a meaningful job. If something comes up that's stressing me out, I'll have a think about whether it's really that important, get help from someone, or if I should just walk away from the situation. If it's stressful and not related to what you value in life, you can probably do without it.
    I hate repeating myself but for you I guess I'll make an exception. It took me a month after applying for CBT to get an appointment. As with everyone else I've known to try this treatment in the last two years.

    I didn't tell him NOT to take antidepressants. I gave him my opinion on antidepressants. At no point did I say, "do no take them". I am not a GP. I am simply describing my experience of antidepressants.

    Most GPs will recommend CBT as the first line of defence combined with drugs. This is why I recommended CBT. I am not forcing him to try it, but I am definitely recommending he try it.

    You've taken that phrase out of context. I said "I have been there" - after saying "Yes, I am aware that there are many issues with the mental health services in the UK." I only meant that I understand there are issues with the mental health services. Not that I have been through his particular condition.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by godivaontherocks)
    One month is not exceptional for CBT at an IAPT centre. I waited one month exactly. No one waits three months anymore. I don't know where you live in the UK but every person I have known to have undergone this treatment with IAPT in the last 2 years has had to wait no more than one month. The waiting time for CBT treatment has been reduced over the last two years. Be aware that I am talking about CBT treatment only, not any other form of counselling.
    I take it every person you know lives in roughly the same area. It varies massively across the country even with the new and also not fully implemented in every area IAPT services. As I said before, you were extremely lucky (and I wouldn't be surprised if you were related to royalty! ) to get it in a month, for the vast majority of people that just doesn't happen. Furthermore (although I will admit I may be slightly off here), IAPT services only give people a certain number of sessions (6 or 10), hardly the long term work you were talking about - and places that do give more have much longer waiting lists.



    Anyway, this argument is unhelpful to the OP so we should stop here to avoid taking things off topic.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Exercising helps me and you could also try herbal medicine
    • Section Leader
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by godivaontherocks)
    Therapy doesn't take 'at least 3 months' to get an appointment. It takes about a month. I've done it. Go to your GP, get a referral, start CBT therapy, put in the effort and time (no quick fixes for this). Antidepressants won't be a long-term solution (or even a quick fix) - they usually take about 3 weeks to see any results, come with unpleasant side-effects that often outweigh the positives and the effects aren't life-changing. CBT will help you to take control of your life and mind and be proactiv.
    It took me around 4 months after being referred by my GP to the relevant people to even get an initial appointment for CBT - took me 4 another months in the end to actually get CBT because I was taken off one waiting list, to put onto another; to be discharged from that one; to then be put back on the actual waiting list for it.

    It's a postcode lottery with these type of things.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I take it every person you know lives in roughly the same area. It varies massively across the country even with the new and also not fully implemented in every area IAPT services. As I said before, you were extremely lucky (and I wouldn't be surprised if you were related to royalty! ) to get it in a month, for the vast majority of people that just doesn't happen. Furthermore (although I will admit I may be slightly off here), IAPT services only give people a certain number of sessions (6 or 10), hardly the long term work you were talking about - and places that do give more have much longer waiting lists.
    No. I spend my time living in two different parts of London. But I usually live in university halls where the majority of students come from all over the country. I think I must be one of the very few Londoners in my hall. Thanks, but I doubt I have any Royal blood in me. I wasn't born here and I'm of mixed origin lol no British in there though!

    You're close. IAPT offers you an initial contract of 8-10 sessions but you can renew that contract at the end of treatment if you both feel you would still benefit from it. This is how I was able to have long-term treatment.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Deyesy)
    It took me around 4 months after being referred by my GP to the relevant people to even get an initial appointment for CBT - took me 4 another months in the end to actually get CBT because I was taken off one waiting list, to put onto another; to be discharged from that one; to then be put back on the actual waiting list for it.

    It's a postcode lottery with these type of things.
    Wow, that's one I've never heard of for CBT. At least not in the last two years. I have been having treatment since I was 17 (nearly 10 years lol)
    I'm sorry you had to endure that.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    how about excercise, green tea (or normal tea but green tea has a more calming effect), reading (specially fantasy to get lost into), or writing. and you can always talk to me or anyone else here about it if you feel comfortable. many of us on this post went through that period or are still in it so we know how it is like.
    hope this helps, always open to talk
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Buy a SAD light and use it for an hour a day. Might help a little.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: May 14, 2015

2,727

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.