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People earning over £60000 should have a 0.8 to the pound tax rate? Watch

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    (Original post by cleverasvoltaire)
    I think it is where I'm heading, for some strange reason. Must be the 14 A*s at GCSE. I apologize I don't know how to do my taxes at the age of 17, I really do, however I'll be earning enough to never have to do my own taxes.
    I wouldn't get cocky yet. Come back when you're sitting on a 1st from Cambridge and an offer from a Magic Circle set.

    Bragging about what you're going to achieve is ludicrous. Especially on the basis of '14 A*s at GCSE'.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    I wouldn't get cocky yet. Come back when you're sitting on a 1st from Cambridge and an offer from a Magic Circle set.

    Bragging about what you're going to achieve is ludicrous. Especially on the basis of '14 A*s at GCSE'.
    I think, by that point, I'll have more important things to be doing than retaliating to criticism on an online forum.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    They're a GCSE/A-Level student. University will do a good job of knocking arrogance out of them.
    I very much doubt it.
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    (Original post by cleverasvoltaire)
    I think, by that point, I'll have more important things to be doing than retaliating to criticism on an online forum.
    You'd think someone aiming for top grades in their AS-levels would also have more important things to do on the eve of exam season.

    14 A*s is really par for the course at a top public school. It may very well be that you could go on to get a good job at the Bar, but there are far too many hurdles in your way to act as though it's a foregone conclusion.
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    (Original post by cleverasvoltaire)
    I very much doubt it.
    It will.

    GCSEs and A-Levels do a good job of lulling people who are top university 'material' into a false sense of academic achievement/ability, primarily because they're not designed to test the kind of ability places like Oxford and Cambridge look for. Pretty much everyone I know at Ox/Cam, myself included, at the 2:2, 2:1 and first level got any semblance of arrogance kicked out of them within the first few weeks of starting - believe it or not, even when you're working at a first it's quite easy to not feel confident and that you're doing 'well' just because of how degrees are structured and designed so that even the best student on the course is getting challenged.

    Given your lack of understanding of how our taxation system works, even after it being explained to you by someone else, you're delusional if you think you're going to be near the top of the pack at a top university, let alone Oxford or Cambridge.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    It will.

    GCSEs and A-Levels do a good job of lulling people who are top university 'material' into a false sense of academic achievement/ability, primarily because they're not designed to test the kind of ability places like Oxford and Cambridge look for. Pretty much everyone I know at Ox/Cam, myself included, at the 2:2, 2:1 and first level got any semblance of arrogance kicked out of them within the first few weeks of starting - believe it or not, even when you're working at a first it's quite easy to not feel confident and that you're doing 'well' just because of how degrees are structured and designed so that even the best student on the course is getting challenged.

    Given your lack of understanding of how our taxation system works, even after it being explained to you by someone else, you're delusional if you think you're going to be near the top of the pack at a top university, let alone Oxford or Cambridge.
    I have, at my school, also done 'electives'- reading/research projects on top of AS levels. I haven't ever found the time to find out how the tax system works and I've apologized for my ignorance but as long as it isn't on the LNAT I should be fine. I have no doubt I'll be challenged but as long as I continue to work extremely hard, I should succeed. But thank you for your constructive criticism.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    You'd think someone aiming for top grades in their AS-levels would also have more important things to do on the eve of exam season.

    14 A*s is really par for the course at a top public school. It may very well be that you could go on to get a good job at the Bar, but there are far too many hurdles in your way to act as though it's a foregone conclusion.
    'Par'? There is only one person who got more than me currently in my entire year (at Harrow) and they only got one more A*. I wasn't even at a public school for GCSE. I've done a ridiculous amount of revision today anyway and I have an exam tomorrow, which I aim to ace. Thanks for your genuine concern.
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    (Original post by cleverasvoltaire)
    I have, at my school, also done 'electives'- reading/research projects on top of AS levels. I haven't ever found the time to find out how the tax system works and I've apologized for my ignorance but as long as it isn't on the LNAT I should be fine. I have no doubt I'll be challenged but as long as I continue to work extremely hard, I should succeed. But thank you for your constructive criticism.
    That's good, and you should continue doing that - it sounds like you're on the right track. At the same time, you should realise that undergrad and beyond is a completely different kettle of fish to pre-university education. People get 3rds, or even fail, at Oxford and Cambridge, those same people were outstanding academically prior to university. If you want people's respect and to be seen as someone who is moderately intelligent, I suggest trying to be a bit more humble over what, to be blunt, isn't anything to write home about, especially if your aim is Cambridge Law.
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    (Original post by cleverasvoltaire)
    'Par'? There is only one person who got more than me currently in my entire year (at Harrow) and they only got one more A*. I wasn't even at a public school for GCSE. I've done a ridiculous amount of revision today anyway and I have an exam tomorrow, which I aim to ace. Thanks for your genuine concern.
    You are doing an admirable job of ignoring the point, which is that your sense of achievement is premature. I don't wish you ill in your endeavours, I'm only saying that as it stands they are nothing more than that.

    Once you've actually attained the things you're after, you can be as distasteful as you like (although people will still dislike you for it). I suppose it's a good thing that the Bar is a lonely profession.

    EDIT: Well, well... http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...e#post54629209
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Some people don't even have the chance to do that due to their social backgrounds.
    Absolutely nothing stops anyone from visiting a free state-funded library either in their city or in their school.

    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    That's not going to happen, that's the same as funding state schools to increase their quality. Money going in to education
    It works in Sweden and it worked in Estonia, the only two countries to have ever tried it, so I don't see a reason why it could not be tried on a small-scale here. If you offer private schools the ability to have tax-free status in return for taking in 10% students from the poorest areas in their local authority, of course their standards will be raised.

    T
    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    hey're different jobs. It's not right however. 45k per annum per head, jesus Christ, that's insane. I doubt the quality of education is far superior to one where you pay 12k a year
    Essentially, people are incentivised to switch jobs through wages. There's the small 5% proportion of people who do jobs for personal beliefs and the other 95% of people are driven by financial incentives. You're not going to stay in a 30k job if you are offered 150k elsewhere. If private schools can lure out the best teachers, as well as pay for various technologies and pay IT staff to develop specialised and in-depth programs/applications which enable e-learning, easier access and a more simplified guide to future examinations, quality of education will be raised.

    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Educational ability may not be, but whether you reach the potential is another question. It's easily hindered by poor schooling which is why these schools should be targeted and standards raised. Good state schools should teach others how to get to their level of teaching and such
    Poor schooling is the result of poor teachers. Poor teachers are the result of lack financial incentives for better teachers to stay in state schools as well as the continuously declining both absolute number of students entering the teaching profession and reputation of teachers. Also - state schools already have joint standard-raising programs through teacher exchanges & meetings. Ask your teacher if they had any general teaching profession assemblies in their local authority within the last 4 weeks, it's probably a yes.

    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    If the state schools mingled with those who attend private schools, their contacts would increase by a huge margin. Friends parents and such.
    Yes but rich people stay away from poor people and poor people don't like rich people. Rich people have kids with rich people, poor people generally stay within the company of other poor people, Hindus generally only have Hindu social contacts, Jews mostly mingle with other Jews, Poles stay around Poles and Southerners stay clear of Northerners. It's nothing a government can change, social contacts and reputation are created by society alone.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auto-segregation
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    (Original post by SotonianOne)
    Absolutely nothing stops anyone from visiting a free state-funded library either in their city or in their school.
    Which are often total garbage
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    (Original post by SotonianOne)
    Yes but rich people stay away from poor people and poor people don't like rich people. Rich people have kids with rich people, poor people generally stay within the company of other poor people, Hindus generally only have Hindu social contacts, Jews mostly mingle with other Jews, Poles stay around Poles and Southerners stay clear of Northerners. It's nothing a government can change, social contacts and reputation are created by society alone.
    Utter crap, I have contacts/friends from an incredible variety of geographic, religious, cultural and financial backgrounds
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    That's good, and you should continue doing that - it sounds like you're on the right track. At the same time, you should realise that undergrad and beyond is a completely different kettle of fish to pre-university education. People get 3rds, or even fail, at Oxford and Cambridge, those same people were outstanding academically prior to university. If you want people's respect and to be seen as someone who is moderately intelligent, I suggest trying to be a bit more humble over what, to be blunt, isn't anything to write home about, especially if your aim is Cambridge Law.
    I'm not sure he's on quite as good a track as he's making out...

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...e#post54629209
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    Which are often total garbage
    You don't need an ipad to learn, a 1980s text book from your subject will do you better than no book at all
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    Utter crap, I have contacts/friends from an incredible variety of geographic, religious, cultural and financial backgrounds
    congratulations, but i said generally
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    You are doing an admirable job of ignoring the point, which is that your sense of achievement is premature. I don't wish you ill in your endeavours, I'm only saying that as it stands they are nothing more than that.

    Once you've actually attained the things you're after, you can be as distasteful as you like (although people will still dislike you for it). I suppose it's a good thing that the Bar is a lonely profession.

    EDIT: Well, well... http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...e#post54629209
    lol at him.

    can you explain how tcs/the bar fits into everything? as in i dont understand what happens post uni, how pupilages fits in with a training contract and where studying at the bar fits in
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    (Original post by welcometoib)
    lol at him.

    can you explain how tcs/the bar fits into everything? as in i dont understand what happens post uni, how pupilages fits in with a training contract and where studying at the bar fits in
    TCs and pupillages belong to separate routes.

    Bar route:

    After university, you study on the GDL for a year if you did a non-law degree, followed by the BPTC. You then undertake pupillage for one year, after which you are a qualified barrister and hope to gain tenancy in chambers.

    Solicitor route:

    After university, you study on the GDL for a year if you did a non-law degree, followed by the LPC. You then undertake a TC for two years, after which you are a qualified solicitor and hope to gain an NQ (newly qualified) position in a firm.
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    (Original post by Stevo F)
    :toofunny:

    So they should earn no more than someone on minimum wage?
    everyone would just do minimum wage jobs cause it's less stress
    What on earth are you talking about?

    Even people taxed at this rate will still earn more than the minimum wage.
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    The top 1% of the population contribute 27% of the total tax revenue. They already are 'doing their bit'. People should be encouraged to work and should get help to do so. Benefits should supplement an income, not replace one altogether. Taking from the rich and giving to the poor would not do a thing if the money isn't being invested in helping improve their education, job prospects etc. If you set the tax rate to 80%, there would be no incentive for people to work hard and earn more. What would be the point of wanting to earn more money if the government just took it all away? You'd also have a situation where the richest in society flock to other countries with lower taxes. This happened in France: they set the top rate of tax (for over 1m euros) to 75%, and last year they lost 14bn euros in tax revenue. Why? Because people were leaving the country.
    Because the top 1% own most of the assets ? Poor people who get crap wages actually get subsidised by the state to work for employers like Tesco.
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    (Original post by SotonianOne)
    You don't need an ipad to learn, a 1980s text book from your subject will do you better than no book at all
    For the vast majority of pupils, a 30 year-old text-book - which will almost certainly not cover areas being tested, and cover areas not being tested - is not good enough. Updated text-books and resources are incredibly important, teachers are not enough.

    (Original post by SotonianOne)
    congratulations, but i said generally
    What a cop-out. You have no idea what the prevalence of the effect you describe is, do you? That's what happens when you pull naive generalisations like that out of your arse.
 
 
 
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