Join TSR now and get all your career questions answeredSign up now
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I had an interview before where the interviewer said he wanted to see applicants to stay in a job for more than a few years; if not, he won't necessarily consider them for the job.

    Do you or the people you've worked with consider job hopping bad?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I don't consider job hopping bad. What's the point in remaining in a job you don't like just for the sake of not wanting to be judged for leaving?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    That's pretty unrealistic of him in this day and age, people move jobs a lot now.

    There's a limit, though - if you have never had one for longer than 6 months (I mean full-time work, not casual or student jobs) then yeah, that's going to be cause for concern unless there are good reasons why.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EdmundWoodstock)
    I don't consider job hopping bad. What's the point in remaining in a job you don't like just for the sake of not wanting to be judged for leaving?
    How about staying more or less than 1 year each?

    (Original post by Antifazian)
    That's pretty unrealistic of him in this day and age, people move jobs a lot now.

    There's a limit, though - if you have never had one for longer than 6 months (I mean full-time work, not casual or student jobs) then yeah, that's going to be cause for concern unless there are good reasons why.
    Yes, he also said that he doesn't want to see people just staying 6 months and then leave.

    But a mate of mine has been getting some discouraging feedbacks for changing companies for every 2 years. .
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    It's ok if you are pursuing contract or temp work. But if you are jumping from permanent role to permanent role every year, very few are going to want to employ you, as the return on investment in employing you probably won't be found until around the time that you are leaving. They won't want to have to be in a position where they have to find a replacement only a matter of months after they have recruited you.

    Depending on the type of jobs you are looking for, look for short term contracts/maternity covers etc, if you really want something that isn't a long term commitment.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    If they are permanent jobs and you can't offer really solid reasons (e.g. harassment) for going from 1 job to another to another over a very short space of time, it's going to look unreliable to an employer.

    However, if it's just temp. work then it's perfectly understandable. I've had uhh 6 jobs in past 1.5 years which were all temps, so it's not really a problem
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    How about staying more or less than 1 year each?



    Yes, he also said that he doesn't want to see people just staying 6 months and then leave.

    But a mate of mine has been getting some discouraging feedbacks for changing companies for every 2 years. .
    I'm not a hiring manager or anything, but I would've thought that changing jobs every 2-3 years early on in your career is quite normal these days.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    I had an interview before where the interviewer said he wanted to see applicants to stay in a job for more than a few years; if not, he won't necessarily consider them for the job.

    Do you or the people you've worked with consider job hopping bad?
    Depends on the industry I think. In mine it's common for people to move around fairly regularly, mainly to collect a pay rise I think.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Antifazian)
    I'm not a hiring manager or anything, but I would've thought that changing jobs every 2-3 years early on in your career is quite normal these days.
    I wouldn't say 2-3 years, more 4-5 is seen as acceptable.

    It does depend on the industry though, as there are some that are known to have a much higher turnover rate than others, and therefore it becomes more acceptable.

    But attitudes are changing. At the beginning of my career, it was seen as really unacceptable to move around frequently. But now people see it as normal. The downside still is recruiters/line managers will think 1) will they leave too quickly and will I be recruiting again in a short time period, 2) is this someone who gets bored easily and won't be focused on the job and if so, do I have the career path/progression they will probably want.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    I had an interview before where the interviewer said he wanted to see applicants to stay in a job for more than a few years; if not, he won't necessarily consider them for the job.

    Do you or the people you've worked with consider job hopping bad?
    If your work is unskilled and you are not actually in a 'career' role, then it doesn't matter. However, as a hiring manager, if you are looking at someone for a career post, then yes, it most certainly is one of the red flags. I'm simply not going to invest in someone who is going to absorb the training/experience and take it somewhere else as soon as they are operating to standard, and leave me with no return.

    Some of the attitudes above are classic indicators of what hiring managers are actively seeking to avoid through the interview process. Less than six months is fine while a student and if the job is basic retail, but anything with a professional company raises a red flag. A couple of moves at the start of a career that are less than 2 years is ok. 2-3 year stays through your 20s is OK, but unless you are working in a real project based sector, you may struggle to get real managerial role without stability in a role/organisation of 5-10 years.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    If your work is unskilled and you are not actually in a 'career' role, then it doesn't matter. However, as a hiring manager, if you are looking at someone for a career post, then yes, it most certainly is one of the red flags. I'm simply not going to invest in someone who is going to absorb the training/experience and take it somewhere else as soon as they are operating to standard, and leave me with no return.

    Some of the attitudes above are classic indicators of what hiring managers are actively seeking to avoid through the interview process. Less than six months is fine while a student and if the job is basic retail, but anything with a professional company raises a red flag. A couple of moves at the start of a career that are less than 2 years is ok. 2-3 year stays through your 20s is OK, but unless you are working in a real project based sector, you may struggle to get real managerial role without stability in a role/organisation of 5-10 years.
    How do you mean by leaving you with no return?

    So, when you're in your 30s you should stayed at least 5 years in a company?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    Depends on the industry I think. In mine it's common for people to move around fairly regularly, mainly to collect a pay rise I think.
    What's your industry?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    I had an interview before where the interviewer said he wanted to see applicants to stay in a job for more than a few years; if not, he won't necessarily consider them for the job.

    Do you or the people you've worked with consider job hopping bad?
    personally I think it depends on your perceived competency.

    If you are viewed as a very capable/intelligent person, they jumping between jobs may just be seen as you quickly climbing the ladder to a position that matches your skill level..

    if you are viewed as a normally or lesser abled person, then jumping between jobs may just be seen as a lack of commitment or or the inability to do your job.

    Which one of these catagories you are viewed in will depend on the rest of your application, interview skills, abilities, history etc.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    What's your industry?
    Oil.
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    How do you mean by leaving you with no return?

    So, when you're in your 30s you should stayed at least 5 years in a company?
    When you are learning a professional, career type job, until you have seen at least one full year/business cycle/round of seasons - nearly always some form of a full 12 months, you are a business risk. You may not be able to cope with Christmas sales, end of year business, the budgeting cycle, launches or whatever is relevant to your sector. So during that period, and it can be longer, you are not working at full capacity for the employer (though hopefully you are working at your full capacity). The employer only gets a return on their investment in your recruitment costs, training costs, mentoring/observation costs (ie more senior staff spending time on developing your skills, explaining the business etc) when you not only are experienced enough to work reliably on your own, but when you get good enough to add additional value to the role. That added value usually only happens after year 2.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    When you are learning a professional, career type job, until you have seen at least one full year/business cycle/round of seasons - nearly always some form of a full 12 months, you are a business risk. You may not be able to cope with Christmas sales, end of year business, the budgeting cycle, launches or whatever is relevant to your sector. So during that period, and it can be longer, you are not working at full capacity for the employer (though hopefully you are working at your full capacity). The employer only gets a return on their investment in your recruitment costs, training costs, mentoring/observation costs (ie more senior staff spending time on developing your skills, explaining the business etc) when you not only are experienced enough to work reliably on your own, but when you get good enough to add additional value to the role. That added value usually only happens after year 2.
    But how does one stay in the same company for 5 to 10 or 30 years? I just cant even fathom it at the moment : /
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    But how does one stay in the same company for 5 to 10 or 30 years? I just cant even fathom it at the moment : /
    Many people move around within companies and get promoted. That keeps them interested, motivated and happy.

    Some people are happy doing what they do in the environment they do it in. They have great work colleagues and enjoy the work, so why would they change jobs and risk losing that?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    But how does one stay in the same company for 5 to 10 or 30 years? I just cant even fathom it at the moment : /
    As J-SP says, you find a community you like, a role you enjoy and you strike the right balance of getting promoted and getting diversity and challenge from that and/or finding your level and something you do want to stick and for years. Within any organisation there are usually a range of career development opportunities from within.
 
 
 
Poll
How are you feeling about your A-level results?
Useful resources

Articles and guides:

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

Featured recruiter profiles:

CGI logo

CGI is open for applications

"Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

Deutsche Bank logo

Deutsche Bank is recruiting

"Thrive in an international banking environment"

ICAEW logo

Merck

"Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

Army logo

The Army is recruiting now

"With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

Handle your digital footprint

What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

Quick links:

Unanswered career sector and employment threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.