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64% of the UK did not want David Cameron as priminister Watch

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    What a stupid thread. In Labour's 1997 landslide victory, Blair only got 43.2% of the popular vote, and by your logic that means 56.8% of the UK didn't want him as PM. The same has happened in every general election - the prime minister has never had a majority share of the popular vote.

    :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    I knew this from a while ago, it's just shocking when you count the numbers and reflect.

    Fair enough then, because I remember similar threads around the last election but people voted to keep FPTP. In all honesty if I had my way people who didn't even know how our electoral system works shouldn't be allowed to vote.
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    But then you could say that 70% didn't vote for Labour
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    Maybe we should call them left- whingers, they'll just have to cope for the five years, or more if they are really lucky.


    The tories only obtained 1/3rd of the popular vote, that means it'll be a hostile 5 years for them, though your ally rupert murdoch will make sure he tends to that.
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    (Original post by ellie98)
    But then you could say that 70% didn't vote for Labour
    And labour only have 6% less votes and are in the minority in government.
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    (Original post by Maid Marian)
    What I don't understand is how UKIP came third but only got one seat. wat wat wat
    FPTP
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    And labour only have 6% less votes and are in the minority in government.
    Labour are not in Government. Tories received a better vote share than Labour in 2005 and have a 12 seat majority whereas Labour had 66.
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    (Original post by Tawheed;[url="tel:55618043")
    55618043[/url]]And labour only have 6% less votes and are in the minority in government.
    That's our voting system for you
    Whether or not people think it's fair or not, it's democratic.
    The Torys are the democratic choice of the electorate.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Voting the conservatives mean you are okay with the idea of a tory government, i think that's a fair statement to make, and following on from that, by logic it is cameron as PM.
    It is fair to say that a Tory voter is fine with a Tory government, or at least they would prefer it over the other probable outcomes, but the same can be said of non-Tory voters. The final leap is still laughable though. I approve of Cameron, therefore I am fine with him being PM, that's not to say that every Tory MP, were they to be leader, I would approve of; depending on the direction they try to take the party I might "flee" to another party, likely UKIP as things stand, but I might also stay and continue supporting and voting Conservative even if I don't particularly want the leader to be PM.

    There is a distinct difference between wanting somebody in a position and being fine with them being in the position. The whole SU, I am fine with them being in their positions, however I don't want them to be there (and consequently because they're all directly elected rather than indirectly I voted for none of them).
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    And labour only have 6% less votes and are in the minority in government.
    Yes, that's how majorities work, the one with the higher number is the majority...
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    I bet you weren't complaining in 2005 when 65% of the electorate did not want Tony Blair or a Labour Govt, and when their share of the vote was only 3% higher than that of the Conservatives.
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    (Original post by sr90)
    I bet you weren't complaining in 2005 when 65% of the electorate did not want Tony Blair or a Labour Govt, and when their share of the vote was only 3% higher than that of the Conservatives.
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
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    The country urgently needs political reform. I talked about this several times so I'll just quote an earlier post:
    (Original post by theroyalwhigs)
    Political Reform
    I am royalist but reformist too. I think a shrunken House of Lords should be merged into the Privy Council, and the powers handed to the Royal Family. Instead of 'hiring' on heredity, it should be based on merit, a bit like the current Privy Council.

    I also think parliament should have it's constituency boundaries redrawn, and elected on the D'Hont system.

    Finally, I think everyone in the court system should be allotted.

    The government should have five tiers: Crown, Parliament, Judiciary, Bank, and Ombudsman; Bank and Ombudsman should have a 'troika' of heads appointed by Crown, Parliament and Judiciary.

    I am pro-EU and pro-Commonwealth, pro-devolution, and pro-secular.


    Another option is simply to convert HoL into a Senate elected on PR, but we'd loose the knowledge based government that I want to instill using HM Privy Council.

    But you are missing an important problem we want to avoid: rule of majority. What we actually need is a diverse range of institutions/tiers governing us to stop tyranny of majority.
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    (Original post by Maid Marian)
    I don't understand how that works
    'FPTP ' is "first past the post" ..

    each constituency returns one member , that person is the one who recieved the most votes .

    simple and straightforward although it does allow the elected peorson to have quite a small overall majority and a small proportion of the vote ...

    in theroy you could have a 5 party election and the elcted person have 20. something % of the votes -
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
    Your original post had nothing to do with party policies, you stated that ''almost 2/3rds of the UK did not want the conservatives to be in government - and they are'' & ''so much for democracy''. How is this any different from the situation ten years ago?

    (Original post by felamaslen)
    In which election has more than 50% of the electorate supported the winning party?
    This has never happened in any post war Government. Thatcher and Blair were close with 44%.
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    I think it's a shame the voting referendum in 2011 didn't change anything. First Past The Post is such a frustrating system because if you're in a marginal constituency you often have to vote for the lesser of two evils, or if you're in a firm Labour/Conservative seat then voting for the party you believe in may not have any effect. I can see why people don't vote (although I think everyone needs to vote - we need to make our voices heard in whatever ways we can, however much/little of a difference people think it makes).

    People didn't really turn up to the voting referendum and it's a shame because I think AV or STV would be a really good idea - it gets rid of the "tactical voting" element to an extent, although there are some issues that need to be worked out with it. Apparently it can lead to bigger landslides in landslide votes but I don't know enough about the complexities of the voting system to say whether that's enough of an issue to make it worth dismissing as a system.

    In any case though, the Tories did get the majority of the votes - even if it was 36% compared to 30%, it is still a majority - but should that be enough for them to have over half the seats?
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Almost 2/3rds of the UK did not want the conservatives to be in government - and they are.

    Thoughts on this?

    This isn't a random figure, i go by the total votes, which put tories at around 36% of the vote. Infact, only 6% more than labour who had 30%. So much for democracy even though i can't think of a better system as yet to supply a majority government.
    (Original post by Dylann)
    What a stupid thread. In Labour's 1997 landslide victory, Blair only got 43.2% of the popular vote, and by your logic that means 56.8% of the UK didn't want him as PM. The same has happened in every general election - the prime minister has never had a majority share of the popular vote.

    :rolleyes:
    (Original post by felamaslen)
    In which election has more than 50% of the electorate supported the winning party?
    (Original post by aoxa)
    You obviously aren't aware of how the first past the post system works - but it's how the country has elected MPs for hundreds of years, so nothing is going to change soon. Suck it up - if you look at statistics over past years, you'll probably find the same pattern.
    Just to provide some numbers:

    2015: 36.9% The Rt Hon David Cameron
    2010: 36.1% + 23% = 59.1% The Rt Hon David Cameron
    2005: 35.2% The Rt Hon Anthony Blair
    2001: 40.7% The Rt Hon Anthony Blair
    1997: 43.2% The Rt Hon Anthony Blair
    1992: 41.9% The Rt Hon Sir John Major
    1987: 42.2% The Rt Hon Baroness Margaret Thatcher
    1983: 42.4% The Rt Hon Baroness Margaret Thatcher
    1979: 43.9% The Rt Hon Baroness Margaret Thatcher
    1974 (Oct): 39.2% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1974 (Feb): 37.2% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1970: 46.4% The Rt Hon Sir Edward Heath
    1966: 48.0% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1964: 44.1% The Rt Hon Baron Harold Wilson
    1959: 49.4% The Rt Hon Earl Harold Macmillan
    1955: 49.7% The Rt Hon Earl Anthony Eden
    1951: 44.3% The Rt Hon Sir Winston Churchill
    1950: 46.1% The Rt Hon Earl Clement Attlee
    1945: 47.7% The Rt Hon Earl Clement Attlee
    1935: 47.8% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1931: 55.0% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1929: 37.1% The Rt Hon Ramsay MacDonald
    1924: 46.8% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1923: 38.0% The Rt Hon Earl Stanley Baldwin
    1922: 38.5% The Rt Hon Andrew Bonar Law
    1918: 33.3% The Rt Hon Andrew Bonar Law
    1910 (Dec): 43.9% The Rt Hon Earl Henry Asquith
    1910 (Jan): 43.1% The Rt Hon Earl Henry Asquith
    1906: 48.9% The Rt Hon Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman
    1900: 50.3% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1895: 49.0% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1892: 47.0% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1886: 51.1% The Rt Hon Marquess Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
    1885: 47.4% The Rt Hon William Ewart Gladstone
    1880: 54.7% The Rt Hon Duke Spencer Cavendish
    1874: 44.3% The Rt Hon Earl Benjamin Disraeli
    1868: 61.5% The Rt Hon William Ewart Gladstone
    1865: 59.5% The Rt Hon Viscount Henry John Temple
    1859: 65.7% The Rt Hon Viscount Henry John Temple
    1857: 65.9%
    The Rt Hon Viscount Henry John Temple
    1852: 41.9% The Rt Hon Earl Edward Smith-Stanley (Opposition won 57.9%)
    1847: 42.7% The Rt Hon Earl Edward Smith-Stanley (Opposition won 53.8%)
    1841: 50.9% The Rt Hon Sir Robert Peel
    1837: 51.7% The Rt Hon Viscount William Lamb
    1835: 57.3% The Rt Hon Viscount William Lamb
    1832: 67.9% The Rt Hon Earl Charles Grey

    No data available before this.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
    really i think you need to look at the facts rather than the propagnda of TULO etal

    Labour are a party of tax , tax borrow spend and borrow some more

    many of the 'hated tory welfare reforms ' are Labour policy - i.e. most of the issues over JSA and ESA

    student funding is the closest you'll ever get to 'free money

    your tax eassertiosn are straight from the clueless muppet crib cards on taxation as issued by the labour party envy based campaigning division
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Perhaps not, but Labour fight for more people than the tories do. A party of less debt and less taxes cutting welfare, raising tuition fee's to give tax breaks on the rich at the cost of indebting future generations with even more debt.
    As much as I agree with you about Labour, that's sadly irrelevant to this debate. Technically, you could even say 72% of the UK did not want Cameron as PM if you include those who didn't vote, but then more didn't want Miliband as PM, so I don't think your complaints here are that justified really, the Tories ultimately got the highest % of the vote and a majority (albeit a small one).
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    probably because 64% of the country are the underclass
 
 
 
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