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    So I understand that the UK has 650 different constituencies, and that each constituencies will vote for the person who they want to represent their constituency. Also, I understand that the party with the most seats is the one that wins, and in theory this sounds like a fair way at selecting a party to rule the country as the majority party is the one that is elected. The problem that I am having, is how is it that only 34% of the UK voted for David Cameron and he won with a majority? Could someone please explain this to me? Thanks!
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    (Original post by Teddysmith123)
    So I understand that the UK has 650 different constituencies, and that each constituencies will vote for the person who they want to represent their constituency. Also, I understand that the party with the most seats is the one that wins, and in theory this sounds like a fair way at selecting a party to rule the country as the majority party is the one that is elected. The problem that I am having, is how is it that only 34% of the UK voted for David Cameron and he won with a majority? Could someone please explain this to me? Thanks!
    Because of first past the post. This is the way MPs are elected in each constituency. It's most votes win. So if you have 30% of votes in a constituency, and a second and third candidate have 25% of the vote and a fourth has 20%, you'll be elected as the member for that constituency. That's how you can win a majority of seats with less than 50% of the vote. The more concentrated your support is in certain areas, the better for your party. For example, UKIP have 4 million odd votes (around 15%) but because their support is fairly evenly spread nationwide, they often finish second this only have one seat. The SNP on the other hand only stand in one area therefore their 1.5 million votes is enough to come first in most of the areas they stand in hence the 56 seats.


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    (Original post by toejoeson)
    Because of first past the post. This is the way MPs are elected in each constituency. It's most votes win. So if you have 30% of votes in a constituency, and a second and third candidate have 25% of the vote and a fourth has 20%, you'll be elected as the member for that constituency. That's how you can win a majority of seats with less than 50% of the vote. The more concentrated your support is in certain areas, the better for your party. For example, UKIP have 4 million odd votes (around 15%) but because their support is fairly evenly spread nationwide, they often finish second this only have one seat. The SNP on the other hand only stand in one area therefore their 1.5 million votes is enough to come first in most of the areas they stand in hence the 56 seats.


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    Ok thank you that actually clears a lot up!
 
 
 

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