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    without proper lessons at school, just as a hobby. I've heard it also looks good on your CV

    where should I start? I've tried the Scratch website but my friend says it's not good for actually learning anything, but I don't know where to begin?
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    It's 100% possible to self teach. Infact, the best programmers are usually the ones who are self taught. Because of the nature of programming you basically teach yourself anyway through many many hours of practice. I'm 100% self taught, but I still study a computing course at college.

    Scratch is not a good start at REAL programming. Scratch is more suitable for kids.

    However, depending on the type of programming you intend to delve into, you will benefit more from learning a particular language.

    For example, if you want to start developing websites, you'd learn languages such as HTML, CSS, JS, and PHP.
    If you want to go into mobile development then learn Java, Swift, C# or Objective-C.
    If you want to go into developing windows application, you should learn C# or Java.
    An all purpose language you could learn is C#.

    I do not recommend for you to learn C++ as a beginner language though, you're better of starting off small with C# or something.
    Also, it helps to join a proper coding forum/community where you can learn from others.
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    I agree with the above.

    You can teach yourself programming. I haven't done any coding courses, although will do a few modules as part of my degree.

    Scratch isn't real programming. Even for kids they'd probably be spending their time better by learning real programming.

    I generally find books the easiest way to learn.

    I recommend learning something like Python because it's a general language and is easy to learn, then move onto other languages from there. I learnt Python as my fourth language but it would have been much easier to do it the other way around and learn Python first.
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    Yes and no. As well as learning programming it's also important to learn the theory behind low level software and hardware concepts. This is much harder to self-teach; as it is less interesting.
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    (Original post by nоt elohssa)
    Yes and no. As well as learning programming it's also important to learn the theory behind low level software and hardware concepts. This is much harder to self-teach; as it is less interesting.
    100% agree. I always struggled more in the theory aspects. But once you wrap yourself around the theory, you start writing better code since you understand how things REALLY work.
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    (Original post by nоt elohssa)
    Yes and no. As well as learning programming it's also important to learn the theory behind low level software and hardware concepts. This is much harder to self-teach; as it is less interesting.
    I agree that this is much more difficult to self-teach, but depending on what the OP is planning on doing it may not be very important.
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    In my opinion, Scratch is good to play around on for a while to get used to the logic behind coding. Then you should try Python, and there are good Youtube tutorials on it. When I learned enough from school and at home, I started making text-based pick-your-path programs and looked up specific parts I needed help on online. I think that's the best way to learn as you can write the program whilst you learn so you don't get bored.
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    (Original post by Async)
    For example, if you want to start developing websites, you'd learn languages such as HTML, CSS, JS, and PHP..
    Worth mentioning that JS is well worth knowing in the video games industry because it's simple and easy enough to be a starting language, and is very similar to LUA which is used by most of the industry for scripting.
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    (Original post by Async)
    For example, if you want to start developing websites, you'd learn languages such as HTML, CSS, JS, and PHP
    Why the hell would you encourage anyone to learn PHP?
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    (Original post by viralpickaxe)
    Why the hell would you encourage anyone to learn PHP?
    Why should I not? Without giving me any subjective opinions, what's wrong with PHP?
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    Google for coursera, search for python. There are some good courses coming up for beginners... and python is a very good first language to learn.
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    (Original post by lightningdoritos)
    without proper lessons at school, just as a hobby. I've heard it also looks good on your CV

    where should I start? I've tried the Scratch website but my friend says it's not good for actually learning anything, but I don't know where to begin?
    Codecademy is a great site for learning how to code ^-^
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    (Original post by imy16)
    Codecademy is a great site for learning how to code ^-^
    Just spent all day on Codeacademy learning HTML and I can start making websites now! (apparently) It's actually quite fun!
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    (Original post by lightningdoritos)
    Just spent all day on Codeacademy learning HTML and I can start making websites now! (apparently) It's actually quite fun!
    haha yeah, learning a new 'computer' language seems soooo long but I really wanna create a lucrative website during uni so I don't freak out about £11K fees *criesss*
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    (Original post by imy16)
    haha yeah, learning a new 'computer' language seems soooo long but I really wanna create a lucrative website during uni so I don't freak out about £11K fees *criesss*
    how far have you got with that? make sure you remember me when you're famous!!
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    (Original post by lightningdoritos)
    how far have you got with that? make sure you remember me when you're famous!!
    got the blueprints pop-up ads and sponsors lined up... just gotta get through this course :crossedf: lol suuure i'll talk about 'lightningdoritos' in my autobiography "how Cameron forced me to learn Code"
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    (Original post by imy16)
    got the blueprints pop-up ads and sponsors lined up... just gotta get through this course :crossedf: lol suuure i'll talk about 'lightningdoritos' in my autobiography "how Cameron forced me to learn Code"
    sounds like it's gonna be good then, good luck with it!
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    It's totally possible to self-teach a language.

    I would start with python, and then move onto a higher language such as C# afterwards.

    I say python because it has simple to use syntax, and is very algorithmic in nature, so it's easy to spot errors too

    Once you have found a language you would like to learn, learn the basics of it, and then google projects you can program and code away. This is what I'm going to be doing once my AS exams are over.

    C# or C++ for my next language? Or just stick to python?
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    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    It's totally possible to self-teach a language.

    I would start with python, and then move onto a higher language such as C# afterwards.

    I say python because it has simple to use syntax, and is very algorithmic in nature, so it's easy to spot errors too

    Once you have found a language you would like to learn, learn the basics of it, and then google projects you can program and code away. This is what I'm going to be doing once my AS exams are over.

    C# or C++ for my next language? Or just stick to python?
    C#. You'll love it, trust me.
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    (Original post by Async)
    C#. You'll love it, trust me.
    Oh go on then. I do wear glasses, so I guess I can C#

    On a more serious note, do you know any sources in which I can learn C#? I'm actually really interested in learning the language now
 
 
 
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