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    (Original post by fabsafxo)
    I think that electrolysis, polymers and nanoparticles ALL came up on the 2014 paper I did, surely it wont come up again???
    Polymers have not come up on the 2014 paper so it could come up tomorrow.

    Here's some predictions for 6 markers:
    Exothermic and Endothermic?
    Rates of Reactions
    Soluble and Insoluble salts
    Ionic substances
    Thermosetting and Thermosoftening polymers
    Electroplating
    Collision theory - probably 3/4 marker
    Metallic bonding
    Factors that affect the yield of reactions
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    (Original post by pollyy)
    In case anyone might find it useful, I did a practice answer on electroplating earlier today:

    Explain how and why a copper cup would be electroplated with silver.

    The cup would act as the negative electrode, and the positive electrode should be a block of pure silver metal. The electrolyte used needs to be an ionic substance containing ions of the plating metal (silver). For example, silver nitrate solution could be used. It is important that the electrolyte is in solution so that the ions can move to carry charge. The silver ions in the electrolyte will move to the negative electrode (the cup) because they are positively charged. Here each silver ion will gain 3 electrons and be reduced to silver atoms, hence the cup will be plated with silver metal. The silver metal at the negative electrode is required to top up the solution with silver ions. Electroplating is done to coat the surface of one metal with another. In this case, it is done for decoration, to make the cup look nice, because making a pure silver cup would be too expensive.

    Would anyone add anything else? Thanks
    Really good answer. How many marks was this question worth?
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    Could anyone give me a simple method on titration. My head is killing because I cannot understand anything to do with it. Pleeease help me!!
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    (Original post by Studentz001)
    Really good answer. How many marks was this question worth?
    Thank you! It's an exam style question from the text book, worth 5 marks.
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    (Original post by morrissies)
    My predictions for B2 are:
    - almost definitely a question on thermosetting/softening polymers, because it hasn't come up in the past four years
    - the 6 marker is unlikely to be a method to do with producing salts, because the B2 six marker was a method (my money is on structure of macromolecules but I'm unsure)
    - hopefully nothing on nano particles because there was a large-ish section on them last year

    praying for a good one!
    There was no section on them last year. Nanotubes were graphite-related not about nanoparticles and even that was only a 2 mark question. I think it will come up this year.
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    If anyone would like to use these online flashcards, they are available

    Unit 2: https://s.tudy.it/uihh9
    Unit 3: https://s.tudy.it/qps72
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    (Original post by Studentz001)
    Could anyone give me a simple method on titration. My head is killing because I cannot understand anything to do with it. Pleeease help me!!
    1. Use a pipette to add (e.g 250cm^3) of the solution of known concentration into conical flask. A conical flask is used to reduce risk of spillage when swirling.

    2. Add indicator (phenolphthalein or methyl orange, but I don't think you need to know this) to the conical flask, and place on a white tile so that a colour change can be easily observed when neutralisation occurs. Ensure not to use universal indicator, as it gives a gradual colour change when a sudden one is needed here.

    3. Fill the burette with the other solution, which you don't know the volume of. Clamp burette above flask.

    4. Dispense the solution in the burette into the flask, dropwise (particularly near neutralisation). Swirl between additions.

    5. When a colour change is observed, record the volume of the substance in the burette that was required for neutralisation.

    6. Repeat the whole thing for more readings to find a mean average. Ensure the same person judges colour change as result can be subjective.

    I think that's everything!
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    Do you all believe that structure of a Diamond and Graphite will come up this year? I really do hope so... they are easy marks!!
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    (Original post by Terrydaktal)
    nanoparticles have a larger surface area to volume ratio than normal particles - 1-100nm
    objects that comprise of nanoparticles are harder and stronger
    nanoparticles react faster due to the fact that they have a higher surface area meaning that there are more exposed particles and less locked in particles within the article itself that aren't reacting as they are not exposed.
    nanotubes - are semiconductors, if thy ask why they are lubriactive then say that their structure is very similar to that of graphite meaning that the layers can slide over eachother due to the fact that that there are weak bonds between the layers.
    You have to say weak intermolecular forces between layers not bonds, good luck tomorrow!
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    If anyone would like to use these online flashcards, they are available

    Unit 2: https://s.tudy.it/uihh9
    Unit 3: https://s.tudy.it/qps72
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    (Original post by Clintbarton)
    Anyone struggling use this - https://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLh...&v=hlSQq1TgMUY MASSIVE HELP along side your revision book (although it says C he covers everything)
    Thanks so much 😊😊😊my C2 exam is tomorrow and that really helped me 😉
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    Thanks, they look really good!
    (Original post by harryleavey)
    If anyone would like to use these online flashcards, they are available

    Unit 2: https://s.tudy.it/uihh9
    Unit 3: https://s.tudy.it/qps72
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    (Original post by pollyy)
    In case anyone might find it useful, I did a practice answer on electroplating earlier today:

    Explain how and why a copper cup would be electroplated with silver.

    The cup would act as the negative electrode, and the positive electrode should be a block of pure silver metal. The electrolyte used needs to be an ionic substance containing ions of the plating metal (silver). For example, silver nitrate solution could be used. It is important that the electrolyte is in solution so that the ions can move to carry charge. The silver ions in the electrolyte will move to the negative electrode (the cup) because they are positively charged. Here each silver ion will gain 3 electrons and be reduced to silver atoms, hence the cup will be plated with silver metal.The silver metal at the negative electrode is required to top up the solution with silver ions. Electroplating is done to coat the surface of one metal with another. In this case, it is done for decoration, to make the cup look nice, because making a pure silver cup would be too expensive.

    Would anyone add anything else? Thanks
    Don't you mean positive? Also, isn't the positive electrode impure?
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    (Original post by RotomGuy)
    Don't you mean positive? Also, isn't the positive electrode impure?
    This is different to purification of a metal. In purification, the impure metal is the positive electrode and the pure is negative.

    In electroplating (which is slightly different), the plating metal (e.g gold or silver) is the positive electrode, and the object to be plated (e.g a spoon) is the negative electrode.
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    Could any one explain me how to do he empirical formula? Am really strugling with this😣
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    (Original post by harryleavey)
    This is different to purification of a metal. In purification, the impure metal is the positive electrode and the pure is negative.

    In electroplating (which is slightly different), the plating metal (e.g gold or silver) is the positive electrode, and the object to be plated (e.g a spoon) is the negative electrode.
    Alright, but why would the object being plated top the solution up with more silver ions if it needs to be plated with it?
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    (Original post by RotomGuy)
    Don't you mean positive? Also, isn't the positive electrode impure?
    haha yes I did sorry about that! Um no I'm pretty sure pure or solution would be contaminated, that's what the revision guide says anyway
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    can someone help me with electrolysis... just a simple method please x
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    Once you understand it it's not too hard... Have a watch of this video, I found it helpful!

    (Original post by mediaya)
    Could any one explain me how to do he empirical formula? Am really strugling with this😣
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    (Original post by pollyy)
    haha yes I did sorry about that! Um no I'm pretty sure pure or solution would be contaminated, that's what the revision guide says anyway
    Alright, just making sure! My revision guide says impure, not sure why.
 
 
 
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