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    it will be absolute pi** take if demography comes up tomorrow. Thats the one I have revised least.
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    (Original post by gemmax6x)
    i just don't know what to put in an essay about childhood! do i put about changes such as compulsory schooling,laws etc., do i put about the march of progress view vs the conflict view or do i put about the arguments as to whterh childhood is disappearing or spreading globally?!
    I feel like childhood is my strongest topic, would you like me to post a practice essay I have done? ( It is by no means perfect, but feedback given was that it would be an A , it just needs more evaluation.)
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    (Original post by BOWE)
    I feel like childhood is my strongest topic, would you like me to post a practice essay I have done? ( It is by no means perfect, but feedback given was that it would be an A , it just needs more evaluation.)
    That would be appreciated!
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    (Original post by Tj789)
    Someone!!! Please please explain what gender regimes are! I dont understand!!!
    Feminist Drew uses the concept of gender regimes to describe policies in different societies (in this case , other countries).

    Familistic gender regimes = based on assumptions that families are nuclear with traditional expressive and instrumental role e.g some countries, such as Greece, have very little welfare for child care because they presume that the mum will be at home looking after the child and the dad will be the bread winner.

    Individualistic gender regimes = government policies that assume husbands and wives should be treated equally, so equal childcare benefits, equal parental leave, more working opportunities for women.
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    (Original post by kristopherm3)
    That would be appreciated!
    Hope this helps let me know if you want me to post some more, I have just done some so have no clue if they are any good or not :P

    Examine different sociological views on changes in the experience of childhood in the
    past 50 years or so.


    Sociologists, such as Wagg, identify the experience of childhood as a social construct. Childhood in Western society is viewed as a significant time in the life cycle in which important developments are made. Pilcher identifies the most significant factor in Western childhood as 'separateness' from adulthood. Children have clothes, toys, activities, laws and social norms separate from that of adults. The sociological debates focus on the changes that have created childhood, march of progress, and the future of childhood.

    Benedict argues that the construct of childhood is dependent upon its surrounding culture. He uses three other studies to support his view. Punch found that children in Bolivia are given responsibility and jobs that are indistinguishable from the adult's manual obs. Children are expected to work and support their family. Firth found that islanders in the West Pacific had a different attitude to the authority of parents. Children were not told what to do. Malinowski found in the West Pacific that adults were more tolerant of children's sexual explorations. These studies support the view that childhood as we know it is not universal.

    Aries argues that even in the UK childhood hasnt always existed. In the Middle ages children were seen as 'mini adults' from an age where they were able to talk and walk. However, Aries sources have been criticised for lacking reliability as he used paintings and diary entries. Pollock rejects Aries' statements and argues that childhood always has and will exist, it just takes different forms. Aries argues that in the 13th century education began to focus solely on children, and the 18th century saw the introduction of child rearing books. He argues that led to the 20th century 'cult of childhood'.

    Changes in society that led to modern childhood include changes in the law. The Child Protection Act 1889 and the Children Act 1989 emphasise the importance of child protection. Compulsory education and the extension of the leaving age have changed childhood as it means children are no longer economic assets who can go out to work, but economic liabilities who are reliant on their parents for longer. Families are also smaller, becoming more child centered. One reason for smaller families is the decline in the in decline in the infant mortality rate as parents are no longer having more children with an expectancy for some to die young. The IMR in 1900 was 154 per 1000 live births per annum, today it is just 5. This shows an improvement in childhood and their welfare. Aries and De Mause argue that all of these changes show a march of progress.

    Child liberationists disagree and argue that legislation and rules for children simply oppress them. They argue that march of progress theorists ignore the inequalities suffered by children as a result of the changes in childhood. Howard identifies inequalities between children of different social classes, children in lower classes are more likely to do poorly at school and suffer illness due to poverty.Hillman identifies inequality between genders; boys are given more freedom than girls. Brannen identifies inequality between ethnicities as Asian parents were found to be stricter. There are also inequalities between children and adults. Childline recieve an average of 20,000 call reporting abuse by an adult every year. Adults also have control over children's space, time, bodies and resources. Children are told what to do, when, where and do not have access to items such as food and money unless provided by adults. Gittins identifies 'age patriarchy' which argues that children are also oppressed by patriarchy in society and the family. Thiara's study supports this view, and found that during interviews of women who had left their husbands, one quarter of them had left to protect their child from harm.

    Postman argues that childhood is has changed again in postmodern society and is now disappearing. He argues that the introduction of print media created a knowledge hierarchy that introduced a separateness between children (who couldn't read so didnt have access to knowledge) and adults. However, media and technology such as TV and the internet allow children to simply watch or hear things without needing to read them, and gain 'adult knowledge'. Opie disagrees with Postman and argues that childhood culture is still in tact and not tainted by adult knowledge.

    Overall, march of progress theorists have been criticised for ignoring inequality and disadvantages of the changes in childhood. INICEF ranked the UK 21st out of 25 countries for child welfare, showing there is still a need for improvement. However, the child liberation theorists' solution of giving children more freedom can arguably be seen as neglectful and dangerous as they are not fully developed and therefore incapable of looking after their own welfare.
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    This is amazing, however you should use a criticism in your second paragraph, besides that, that's an A right there, great stuff, thanks for sharing!
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    Also add toxic childhood,conventional approach,laws , economic assets to dependency etc also criticise march of progress for ignoring dark side of the family/childhood
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    (Original post by BOWE)
    Hope this helps let me know if you want me to post some more, I have just done some so have no clue if they are any good or not :P

    Examine different sociological views on changes in the experience of childhood in the
    past 50 years or so.

    Sociologists, such as Wagg, identify the experience of childhood as a social construct. Childhood in Western society is viewed as a significant time in the life cycle in which important developments are made. Pilcher identifies the most significant factor in Western childhood as 'separateness' from adulthood. Children have clothes, toys, activities, laws and social norms separate from that of adults. The sociological debates focus on the changes that have created childhood, march of progress, and the future of childhood.

    Benedict argues that the construct of childhood is dependent upon its surrounding culture. He uses three other studies to support his view. Punch found that children in Bolivia are given responsibility and jobs that are indistinguishable from the adult's manual obs. Children are expected to work and support their family. Firth found that islanders in the West Pacific had a different attitude to the authority of parents. Children were not told what to do. Malinowski found in the West Pacific that adults were more tolerant of children's sexual explorations. These studies support the view that childhood as we know it is not universal.

    Aries argues that even in the UK childhood hasnt always existed. In the Middle ages children were seen as 'mini adults' from an age where they were able to talk and walk. However, Aries sources have been criticised for lacking reliability as he used paintings and diary entries. Pollock rejects Aries' statements and argues that childhood always has and will exist, it just takes different forms. Aries argues that in the 13th century education began to focus solely on children, and the 18th century saw the introduction of child rearing books. He argues that led to the 20th century 'cult of childhood'.

    Changes in society that led to modern childhood include changes in the law. The Child Protection Act 1889 and the Children Act 1989 emphasise the importance of child protection. Compulsory education and the extension of the leaving age have changed childhood as it means children are no longer economic assets who can go out to work, but economic liabilities who are reliant on their parents for longer. Families are also smaller, becoming more child centered. One reason for smaller families is the decline in the in decline in the infant mortality rate as parents are no longer having more children with an expectancy for some to die young. The IMR in 1900 was 154 per 1000 live births per annum, today it is just 5. This shows an improvement in childhood and their welfare. Aries and De Mause argue that all of these changes show a march of progress.

    Child liberationists disagree and argue that legislation and rules for children simply oppress them. They argue that march of progress theorists ignore the inequalities suffered by children as a result of the changes in childhood. Howard identifies inequalities between children of different social classes, children in lower classes are more likely to do poorly at school and suffer illness due to poverty.Hillman identifies inequality between genders; boys are given more freedom than girls. Brannen identifies inequality between ethnicities as Asian parents were found to be stricter. There are also inequalities between children and adults. Childline recieve an average of 20,000 call reporting abuse by an adult every year. Adults also have control over children's space, time, bodies and resources. Children are told what to do, when, where and do not have access to items such as food and money unless provided by adults. Gittins identifies 'age patriarchy' which argues that children are also oppressed by patriarchy in society and the family. Thiara's study supports this view, and found that during interviews of women who had left their husbands, one quarter of them had left to protect their child from harm.

    Postman argues that childhood is has changed again in postmodern society and is now disappearing. He argues that the introduction of print media created a knowledge hierarchy that introduced a separateness between children (who couldn't read so didnt have access to knowledge) and adults. However, media and technology such as TV and the internet allow children to simply watch or hear things without needing to read them, and gain 'adult knowledge'. Opie disagrees with Postman and argues that childhood culture is still in tact and not tainted by adult knowledge.

    Overall, march of progress theorists have been criticised for ignoring inequality and disadvantages of the changes in childhood. INICEF ranked the UK 21st out of 25 countries for child welfare, showing there is still a need for improvement. However, the child liberation theorists' solution of giving children more freedom can arguably be seen as neglectful and dangerous as they are not fully developed and therefore incapable of looking after their own welfare.
    You are a lifesaver! Thank you so so so much!
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    (Original post by BOWE)
    Hope this helps let me know if you want me to post some more, I have just done some so have no clue if they are any good or not :P

    Examine different sociological views on changes in the experience of childhood in the
    past 50 years or so.

    Sociologists, such as Wagg, identify the experience of childhood as a social construct. Childhood in Western society is viewed as a significant time in the life cycle in which important developments are made. Pilcher identifies the most significant factor in Western childhood as 'separateness' from adulthood. Children have clothes, toys, activities, laws and social norms separate from that of adults. The sociological debates focus on the changes that have created childhood, march of progress, and the future of childhood.

    Benedict argues that the construct of childhood is dependent upon its surrounding culture. He uses three other studies to support his view. Punch found that children in Bolivia are given responsibility and jobs that are indistinguishable from the adult's manual obs. Children are expected to work and support their family. Firth found that islanders in the West Pacific had a different attitude to the authority of parents. Children were not told what to do. Malinowski found in the West Pacific that adults were more tolerant of children's sexual explorations. These studies support the view that childhood as we know it is not universal.

    Aries argues that even in the UK childhood hasnt always existed. In the Middle ages children were seen as 'mini adults' from an age where they were able to talk and walk. However, Aries sources have been criticised for lacking reliability as he used paintings and diary entries. Pollock rejects Aries' statements and argues that childhood always has and will exist, it just takes different forms. Aries argues that in the 13th century education began to focus solely on children, and the 18th century saw the introduction of child rearing books. He argues that led to the 20th century 'cult of childhood'.

    Changes in society that led to modern childhood include changes in the law. The Child Protection Act 1889 and the Children Act 1989 emphasise the importance of child protection. Compulsory education and the extension of the leaving age have changed childhood as it means children are no longer economic assets who can go out to work, but economic liabilities who are reliant on their parents for longer. Families are also smaller, becoming more child centered. One reason for smaller families is the decline in the in decline in the infant mortality rate as parents are no longer having more children with an expectancy for some to die young. The IMR in 1900 was 154 per 1000 live births per annum, today it is just 5. This shows an improvement in childhood and their welfare. Aries and De Mause argue that all of these changes show a march of progress.

    Child liberationists disagree and argue that legislation and rules for children simply oppress them. They argue that march of progress theorists ignore the inequalities suffered by children as a result of the changes in childhood. Howard identifies inequalities between children of different social classes, children in lower classes are more likely to do poorly at school and suffer illness due to poverty.Hillman identifies inequality between genders; boys are given more freedom than girls. Brannen identifies inequality between ethnicities as Asian parents were found to be stricter. There are also inequalities between children and adults. Childline recieve an average of 20,000 call reporting abuse by an adult every year. Adults also have control over children's space, time, bodies and resources. Children are told what to do, when, where and do not have access to items such as food and money unless provided by adults. Gittins identifies 'age patriarchy' which argues that children are also oppressed by patriarchy in society and the family. Thiara's study supports this view, and found that during interviews of women who had left their husbands, one quarter of them had left to protect their child from harm.

    Postman argues that childhood is has changed again in postmodern society and is now disappearing. He argues that the introduction of print media created a knowledge hierarchy that introduced a separateness between children (who couldn't read so didnt have access to knowledge) and adults. However, media and technology such as TV and the internet allow children to simply watch or hear things without needing to read them, and gain 'adult knowledge'. Opie disagrees with Postman and argues that childhood culture is still in tact and not tainted by adult knowledge.

    Overall, march of progress theorists have been criticised for ignoring inequality and disadvantages of the changes in childhood. INICEF ranked the UK 21st out of 25 countries for child welfare, showing there is still a need for improvement. However, the child liberation theorists' solution of giving children more freedom can arguably be seen as neglectful and dangerous as they are not fully developed and therefore incapable of looking after their own welfare.

    Hey great essay! But you know how it says 50 years, I dont think we should talk about historical differences as it goes past that
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    (Original post by kirpal7)
    This is amazing, however you should use a criticism in your second paragraph, besides that, that's an A right there, great stuff, thanks for sharing!
    Ah, you are more than welcome Now just fingers crossed this question comes up haha. Good luck for tomorrow !!
    • Welcome Squad
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    (Original post by BOWE)
    Hope this helps let me know if you want me to post some more, I have just done some so have no clue if they are any good or not :P

    Examine different sociological views on changes in the experience of childhood in the
    past 50 years or so.


    Sociologists, such as Wagg, identify the experience of childhood as a social construct. Childhood in Western society is viewed as a significant time in the life cycle in which important developments are made. Pilcher identifies the most significant factor in Western childhood as 'separateness' from adulthood. Children have clothes, toys, activities, laws and social norms separate from that of adults. The sociological debates focus on the changes that have created childhood, march of progress, and the future of childhood.

    Benedict argues that the construct of childhood is dependent upon its surrounding culture. He uses three other studies to support his view. Punch found that children in Bolivia are given responsibility and jobs that are indistinguishable from the adult's manual obs. Children are expected to work and support their family. Firth found that islanders in the West Pacific had a different attitude to the authority of parents. Children were not told what to do. Malinowski found in the West Pacific that adults were more tolerant of children's sexual explorations. These studies support the view that childhood as we know it is not universal.

    Aries argues that even in the UK childhood hasnt always existed. In the Middle ages children were seen as 'mini adults' from an age where they were able to talk and walk. However, Aries sources have been criticised for lacking reliability as he used paintings and diary entries. Pollock rejects Aries' statements and argues that childhood always has and will exist, it just takes different forms. Aries argues that in the 13th century education began to focus solely on children, and the 18th century saw the introduction of child rearing books. He argues that led to the 20th century 'cult of childhood'.

    Changes in society that led to modern childhood include changes in the law. The Child Protection Act 1889 and the Children Act 1989 emphasise the importance of child protection. Compulsory education and the extension of the leaving age have changed childhood as it means children are no longer economic assets who can go out to work, but economic liabilities who are reliant on their parents for longer. Families are also smaller, becoming more child centered. One reason for smaller families is the decline in the in decline in the infant mortality rate as parents are no longer having more children with an expectancy for some to die young. The IMR in 1900 was 154 per 1000 live births per annum, today it is just 5. This shows an improvement in childhood and their welfare. Aries and De Mause argue that all of these changes show a march of progress.

    Child liberationists disagree and argue that legislation and rules for children simply oppress them. They argue that march of progress theorists ignore the inequalities suffered by children as a result of the changes in childhood. Howard identifies inequalities between children of different social classes, children in lower classes are more likely to do poorly at school and suffer illness due to poverty.Hillman identifies inequality between genders; boys are given more freedom than girls. Brannen identifies inequality between ethnicities as Asian parents were found to be stricter. There are also inequalities between children and adults. Childline recieve an average of 20,000 call reporting abuse by an adult every year. Adults also have control over children's space, time, bodies and resources. Children are told what to do, when, where and do not have access to items such as food and money unless provided by adults. Gittins identifies 'age patriarchy' which argues that children are also oppressed by patriarchy in society and the family. Thiara's study supports this view, and found that during interviews of women who had left their husbands, one quarter of them had left to protect their child from harm.

    Postman argues that childhood is has changed again in postmodern society and is now disappearing. He argues that the introduction of print media created a knowledge hierarchy that introduced a separateness between children (who couldn't read so didnt have access to knowledge) and adults. However, media and technology such as TV and the internet allow children to simply watch or hear things without needing to read them, and gain 'adult knowledge'. Opie disagrees with Postman and argues that childhood culture is still in tact and not tainted by adult knowledge.

    Overall, march of progress theorists have been criticised for ignoring inequality and disadvantages of the changes in childhood. INICEF ranked the UK 21st out of 25 countries for child welfare, showing there is still a need for improvement. However, the child liberation theorists' solution of giving children more freedom can arguably be seen as neglectful and dangerous as they are not fully developed and therefore incapable of looking after their own welfare.
    Your essay is amazing! Did you write it closed-book? If so, did you write in time or did you take longer to complete it?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by BOWE)
    I feel like childhood is my strongest topic, would you like me to post a practice essay I have done? ( It is by no means perfect, but feedback given was that it would be an A , it just needs more evaluation.)
    Hey you say it needs more evaluation, but how do you mean because I read your essay and I was thinking the evaluation is great- because what I assume from evaluation is critising something or mentioning its strengths. So you talked about Aries and then you countered that with Pollack- that's evaluation right?
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    (Original post by Tj789)
    Hey great essay! But you know how it says 50 years, I dont think we should talk about historical differences as it goes past that
    I know I completely agree, I sort of just offloaded literally everything I could remember , oops.
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    (Original post by BOWE)
    Ah, you are more than welcome Now just fingers crossed this question comes up haha. Good luck for tomorrow !!

    You too!
    thank you.
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    (Original post by Tj789)
    Hey you say it needs more evaluation, but how do you mean because I read your essay and I was thinking the evaluation is great- because what I assume from evaluation is critising something or mentioning its strengths. So you talked about Aries and then you countered that with Pollack- that's evaluation right?
    Yeah it hits the evaluation AO , but needs more clear vocab to show the direction of my argument, 'However' 'On the other hand' 'In contrast' but I don't think it would mark the essay down too severely. (I hope)
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    [QUOTE=BOWE;55675523]I know I completely agree, I sort of just offloaded literally everything I could remember , oops. [/QUOTE)

    Im not knocking it at all though!
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    LETS PLAN AN ESSAY!
    Ok so tomorrow there is a HIGH chance social policy will make an appearance! So I dug through some past questions and I found ones that's a little tricky:

    Examine the ways in which social polices influence families and households

    Lets share ideas!
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    If Migration was to come up does anyone know what you would include, I dont understand it at all.
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    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Your essay is amazing! Did you write it closed-book? If so, did you write in time or did you take longer to complete it?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yeah I did it closed book, and in 30 minutes, which is longer than what I have hoped as I did a question on views on diversity and life course analysis after and think I did way worse on it. Im a visual learner to my room is plastered with colourful mindmaps haha so I had to make sure I didn't look up.

    If I typed up the essay on diversity would anyone be able to give it some feedback please?
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    (Original post by Tj789)
    LETS PLAN AN ESSAY!
    Ok so tomorrow there is a HIGH chance social policy will make an appearance! So I dug through some past questions and I found ones that's a little tricky:

    Examine the ways in which social polices influence families and households

    Lets share ideas!
    I did a practice essay on this as well! Have no clue if it is any good at all, want me to type it up? feel free to give it some crit and feedback if you can.
 
 
 
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