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Do I have dyspraxia? Watch

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    Hello. I am a 17-year old male that struggles with basic skills daily. I don't know why. I just wanted to ask whether I should get a diagnosis or if it can be treated or anything. This might be a long post, so I'm warning you.

    Let's cut to the chase. I can't tie my shoelaces. I know exactly what you're thinking. 17? What have your parents taught you? You're useless.

    No matter how many times I try, my laces either turn into a tangled mess or I do it sort of right and then it just unloosens as I walk. My dad has tried teaching me on dozens of occasions. I even brought up YouTube a few times and even when I stop and pause the video numerous times, I find myself in a fiddle. It's not like I haven't tried or anything. I keep resorting to sticking the laces into the back of my shoe, but I want to learn. I've poured many hours, and have had no luck. My 13-year old brother can easily tie his shoe-laces. Like many others. I don't want my problem to consume me. It gets worse.

    I don't know if this means anything, but when I'm at school writing in my book, I always tilt my book at a 45 degree angle and move my thumb as I write. This isn't really a problem, just something I guess.

    What is a problem however is my memory. If someone told me to do something, I would start proceeding and then within 20 seconds, I forget. I have to ask again to double check, or guess. Always. It's annoying.

    My organisational skills tie in with that in some form. I am terrible at keeping myself organised and work organised - I'm in my AS-year at Sixth Form. How will I cope with the world of work if I can't even get myself organised with A-levels? I get distracted by many things. I find myself daydreaming a lot.

    I am also a bit clumsy, but not very clumsy. I mean, when I enter classrooms to go towards my seat I'm having to touch the chairs or table weirdly or bend my legs awkwardly to avoid tripping over the chair legs. I don't know why. It's something I do.

    I can't play football with my friends anymore because my trainers have laces and my shoes will fly off. I told one of my friends that I can't tie shoe laces, he laughed and called me a retard (but not in a mean way). He is a good friend, believe me. Probably just taken aback by how I useless I am with my hands. This makes me depressed. I try to learn, but I find it hard. I love football. I'm always interested in what is happening in the world of football, but I also want to play football physically with my friends. But I told that one friend not to tell anyone else. How would they react? I'm trying.

    Should I get a diagnosis? Do I have dyspraxia?
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    You should indefinitely see your GP; explain this all and how it is causing you psychological stress to the point of depression and much frustration. It seems you are struggling with some everyday motor skills which may or may not be due to dyspraxia and so a doctors visit would be appropriate visit!

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    Sounds like dyspraxia. are you in education? If so you ve better luck seeing an educational psychologist for a diagnosis or if you re an ot privately.
    The posters above suggestion could work but at 17 they may not fund a diagnosis due to funding so if you can go down the education route I d suggest that would be easier. ( I have dyspraxia myself so if you d like any further advice you are welcome to pm me )
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    You can have physio and practical support but it can't be cured, over the years I ve struggled to accept my dyspraxia. School was pretty rough but now at 20 after fluking a levels, I m doing well in uni so never lose hope
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    Not what you're asking. But I use these Like you, I can't tie my laces properly. Or rather, I can sometimes tie them; but they come undone or are never tight enough.
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    I'm in my third year of uni now and was diagnosed at the beginning of last year, your symptoms are pretty much exactly the same as mine. I'd recommend going and getting tested before you actually take any of the following information too seriously, because I can't know for sure whether you have dyspraxia but it does sound pretty likely to me. My university allowed me to get tested for free, but I'm not sure how it works at school. The bending your legs awkwardly to sit down at a desk is definitely something I can relate to haha.

    I'll warn you now it is pretty depressing at first being told you have a learning difficulty. That being said, I'm glad that I've done it, mainly because now I know why I find it harder to do work than everyone else. I've been told my whole life that I've 'not tried hard enough' and that I've got 'great potential' but that I'm lazy, which I now know is *******s.

    Definitely don't give up on the football. The woman who gave me my diagnosis told me that one of the best therapies for dyspraxia is physical activity, and I've started going to the gym regularly and taken up MMA which have improved my balance, coordination, and confidence massively.

    In terms of the fine motor skills like tying your laces, again I'd recommend that you just keep practising every day. My fine motor skills are pretty good as I've played guitar since I was really young, so maybe you could try taking up an instrument.

    I also struggle a lot with coordination and memory. The best advice I could give you here is to make a detailed, day-to-day plan for whatever work you have to do and stick to it (although I'm sure you've heard this from teachers loads). I do English at uni and I've realised that the best method for writing essays is to make a detailed structure and plan with the exact quotes and paragraph topics a few days in advance, and then sit down and write the whole essay in one go by hand. Writing an informal first draft by hand before typing it up really helps with writer's block as it kind of gets a flow going.

    The most important piece of advice I can give you is to just keep working at it and don't stress about it. If you are diagnosed with dyspraxia you'll probably find yourself confronted with a load of 'sympathetic', patronising medical professionals who'll probably treat you a little bit like you're some sort of special case, but always remember not to take them too seriously. Finding out that you have dyspraxia is just the first step to figuring out how to improve yourself, and it doesn't change anything about who you are.

    There are loads of benefits to having dyspraxia that no one ever talks about - mainly that dyspraxics (like dyslexics) have a much stronger sense of empathy and understanding of other people. We also tend to be more in touch with our creative side, more appreciative of art and music and are a lot more perceptive than others, which I believe is why I'm so good at my course (in the humblest way possible...)

    If you want any advice about anything or just want to chat, send me a PM (although I don't check this site much). I'd be happy to help, I'd have really appreciated having someone there to talk to when I was first finding out about all this.

    But then again, if you get tested and you don't have dyspraxia, ignore everything I've just written! Anyway, back to writing that essay...
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    (Original post by newhullian)
    I'm in my third year of uni now and was diagnosed at the beginning of last year, your symptoms are pretty much exactly the same as mine. I'd recommend going and getting tested before you actually take any of the following information too seriously, because I can't know for sure whether you have dyspraxia but it does sound pretty likely to me. My university allowed me to get tested for free, but I'm not sure how it works at school. The bending your legs awkwardly to sit down at a desk is definitely something I can relate to haha.

    I'll warn you now it is pretty depressing at first being told you have a learning difficulty. That being said, I'm glad that I've done it, mainly because now I know why I find it harder to do work than everyone else. I've been told my whole life that I've 'not tried hard enough' and that I've got 'great potential' but that I'm lazy, which I now know is *******s.

    Definitely don't give up on the football. The woman who gave me my diagnosis told me that one of the best therapies for dyspraxia is physical activity, and I've started going to the gym regularly and taken up MMA which have improved my balance, coordination, and confidence massively.

    In terms of the fine motor skills like tying your laces, again I'd recommend that you just keep practising every day. My fine motor skills are pretty good as I've played guitar since I was really young, so maybe you could try taking up an instrument.

    I also struggle a lot with coordination and memory. The best advice I could give you here is to make a detailed, day-to-day plan for whatever work you have to do and stick to it (although I'm sure you've heard this from teachers loads). I do English at uni and I've realised that the best method for writing essays is to make a detailed structure and plan with the exact quotes and paragraph topics a few days in advance, and then sit down and write the whole essay in one go by hand. Writing an informal first draft by hand before typing it up really helps with writer's block as it kind of gets a flow going.

    The most important piece of advice I can give you is to just keep working at it and don't stress about it. If you are diagnosed with dyspraxia you'll probably find yourself confronted with a load of 'sympathetic', patronising medical professionals who'll probably treat you a little bit like you're some sort of special case, but always remember not to take them too seriously. Finding out that you have dyspraxia is just the first step to figuring out how to improve yourself, and it doesn't change anything about who you are.

    There are loads of benefits to having dyspraxia that no one ever talks about - mainly that dyspraxics (like dyslexics) have a much stronger sense of empathy and understanding of other people. We also tend to be more in touch with our creative side, more appreciative of art and music and are a lot more perceptive than others, which I believe is why I'm so good at my course (in the humblest way possible...)

    If you want any advice about anything or just want to chat, send me a PM (although I don't check this site much). I'd be happy to help, I'd have really appreciated having someone there to talk to when I was first finding out about all this.

    But then again, if you get tested and you don't have dyspraxia, ignore everything I've just written! Anyway, back to writing that essay...
    As for the depressing part, i d guess i wasnt that depressed when i originally found out but i do get days when i hate being dyspraxic so i guess it depends on the person
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    (Original post by newhullian)
    I'm in my third year of uni now and was diagnosed at the beginning of last year, your symptoms are pretty much exactly the same as mine.

    But then again, if you get tested and you don't have dyspraxia, ignore everything I've just written! Anyway, back to writing that essay...

    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Be careful with some medication they can be a little on the dangerous side if you keep taking them. As for the depressing part, i d guess i wasnt that depressed when i originally found out but i do get days when i hate being dyspraxic so i guess it depends on the person

    Hey you've probably got the greatest of intentions but is it possible for you to edit out the sensitive part, likewise I will too just as claireestelle has mentioned - it could be dangerous. The thing we should consider is we're on a student forum with a lot of wondering minds whom can be vulnerable and I suspect it's not appropriate because it's liable to being abused, maybe change it to a subtle description.
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    (Original post by newhullian)
    I'm in my third year of uni now and was diagnosed at the beginning of last year, your symptoms are pretty much exactly the same as mine.

    But then again, if you get tested and you don't have dyspraxia, ignore everything I've just written! Anyway, back to writing that essay...
    In case you aren't able to edit; I've reported the post - not because your wrong or doing bad but as mentioned above; stay cool

    (Original post by claireestelle)
    I ll happily edit mine,should have worded it better really,I do think its a bad idea to take if not on prescription
    Me too, could you also edit the part where you quote me too - thanks! I agree with you and so let's stay well
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    As someone with dyspraxia, I can truly identify with you, and your symptoms sound exactly like mine (21, female.... shoe laces o.O a HUUUUGE no no for me :/ I would recommend getting a diagnosis, talk to your G.P or learning support team if your in education, explain your symptoms, ask to be tested... you are not alone if you ever wanna chat, your welcome to pm me
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    Thanks guys. One more thing, I also can't hold knives and forks properly. I can't eat without making a mess. Especially embarrassing at restaurants.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks guys. One more thing, I also can't hold knives and forks properly. I can't eat without making a mess. Especially embarrassing at restaurants.
    I struggle with cutlery myself, had cutlery with special handles for years. Have you considered buying some with thicker handles? You can buy dyspraxic friendly cutlery online but getting it in adult sized ones might be a little difficult. I do eat incredibly slowly now so I don't make a mess but still occasionally difficult .
 
 
 
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