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Do you study music, or composition? Have an interest in it? Write your own music? Watch

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    Do you study music? Do you compose? Interested in writing your own music or about how music is written?

    I've been a member of TSR for a few years now, and I'd like to chat with other people who are perhaps studying music, or interested in the creation of it, or anything outside and in between. So, might I start with my own little intro:

    Hey, I'm a composer, I've just finished my degree and I work mostly with film music. I've had a fair share of tough times with sometimes unlawful teachers and unnecessarily competitive companions, but I've made it through and now, I'm interested to see who else on this forum has similar aspirations

    And I invite you to give yours.


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    The reason this doesn't really fit into a particular category is because it goes across study, interest and chat categories.
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    Depends on what you define as writing music. I've been producing music via software for about 4 years now. I have a plethora of tastes, which range from futuristic electronic music, to sweet and calm orchestral scores. Maybe some R'n'B as well.

    I can't play an instrument. Not to a good level at least. You just finished a degree! I'm 17 right now, in my AS-year, and once I've finished my exams I intend to buy a keyboard to learn how to play it. Obviously a real piano is clearly distinguishable, especially in terms of velocity and the acoustics of it but I can't afford one. I want to be able to play an instrument, so I'm going to get a keyboard some few months later. Just a decent standard would suffice, seriously I'm that bad. I can play a few chords and some melodies but barely a handful.

    I can read basic score sheets. I mean VERY basic. But I've still gone through and ploughed through maybe several hundred hours through the internet, learning music theory and how synthesis works, how waveforms are articulated and vice versa. But things I didn't cover too much were minors, majors, the key of a song etc. BPM is something I can relate to easily. There's a lot to learn, but it's easy as ever now I must admit, utilising the internet since it's there sat right in front of me. I'm doing Music Tech at AS, to broaden my understanding especially for recording physical instruments with colleagues. Stretching knowledge on musical production is always good, that's why I'm usually ahead of everyone else in my class as I'm doing research on it every other day. Commitment? I'd like to think so.

    Film music however is not something I've exactly touched upon. What did you learn throughout your degree? Was it worth it? Maybe it's about what you learn throughout the course of your degree rather than the employability behind the qualification? Tell me, I'm interested
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    I make scat songs while scrubbing myself in the shower if that counts
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    Doing a PhD in the social anthropology of music! :awesome: In many ways, it's a waste of time and money but I love studying how people interact with music and I still had so much to say and explore, so I embarked on a PhD course last September

    Film music is awesome, as is creating music via software. I lack talent in both areas, sadly. It was a pipe dream for a while to be a film music arranger-conductor but it's just too expensive to get into for someone from my background :sadnod:

    Ah well, you never know what may happen in the future! :moon:
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    (Original post by HeskeyLAD)
    Depends on what you define as writing music. I've been producing music via software for about 4 years now. I have a plethora of tastes, which range from futuristic electronic music, to sweet and calm orchestral scores. Maybe some R'n'B as well.

    I can't play an instrument. Not to a good level at least. You just finished a degree! I'm 17 right now, in my AS-year, and once I've finished my exams I intend to buy a keyboard to learn how to play it. Obviously a real piano is clearly distinguishable, especially in terms of velocity and the acoustics of it but I can't afford one. I want to be able to play an instrument, so I'm going to get a keyboard some few months later. Just a decent standard would suffice, seriously I'm that bad. I can play a few chords and some melodies but barely a handful.

    I can read basic score sheets. I mean VERY basic. But I've still gone through and ploughed through maybe several hundred hours through the internet, learning music theory and how synthesis works, how waveforms are articulated and vice versa. But things I didn't cover too much were minors, majors, the key of a song etc. BPM is something I can relate to easily. There's a lot to learn, but it's easy as ever now I must admit, utilising the internet since it's there sat right in front of me. I'm doing Music Tech at AS, to broaden my understanding especially for recording physical instruments with colleagues. Stretching knowledge on musical production is always good, that's why I'm usually ahead of everyone else in my class as I'm doing research on it every other day. Commitment? I'd like to think so. =

    Film music however is not something I've exactly touched upon. What did you learn throughout your degree? Was it worth it? Maybe it's about what you learn throughout the course of your degree rather than the employability behind the qualification? Tell me, I'm interested


    If you want a good virtual instrument for piano, I heartily recommend Native Instrument’s “The Giant”. Very versatile, and meticulously sampled to the point of allowing half-pedalling, individual adjustment of overtones and lots more. It’s my Go-To for piano.

    What are you submitting for your AS Multitrack? I've actually taught AS MT, feel free to send an MP3 over, I can point out some places where you can improve a few marks.

    My degree was fantastic, but highly dependent on where you study it. I did my first year in Dubai, where I had an amazing social crowd of like-minded people and we were always being proactive and helping each other out. Which, being pretty much the only students in that field in the whole area, meant we were always promoting each other and getting each other work. It was great, best year of my life. Then I transferred to finish the degree in London (same university, different campus), and it was horrid. There was zero social aspect, everybody was far more interested in being as hostile as possible to everyone else to try and keep the competition away from them, the staff were disorganised and the actual modules - while supposedly the same degree - were completely confused, so much as to the point where staff didn’t even have a clue what the unit guidelines were when they marked work, and sometimes didn’t even turn up to lectures.

    When it comes to employability, as with most things in this world, it all boils down to who you know. I’ve never had to “apply” for a job, but that being said, I don’t think there would be much use in it anyway. Here, pretty much everything runs on a project-by-project basis, and the majority of the team are hired based on one person knowing another person knowing another person etc etc etc.

    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Doing a PhD in the social anthropology of music! :awesome: In many ways, it's a waste of time and money but I love studying how people interact with music and I still had so much to say and explore, so I embarked on a PhD course last September

    Film music is awesome, as is creating music via software. I lack talent in both areas, sadly. It was a pipe dream for a while to be a film music arranger-conductor but it's just too expensive to get into for someone from my background :sadnod:

    Ah well, you never know what may happen in the future! :moon:
    What was it that you found made it so expensive? You can get perfectly usable setups for £10000. Less even, if you really cut down and know what works for you before you buy it.
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    [QUOTE=XMaramena;56223061What was it that you found made it so expensive? You can get perfectly usable setups for £10000. Less even, if you really cut down and know what works for you before you buy it.[/QUOTE]

    That's my idea of expensive Plus getting someone to teach me the art of arranging, or doing a relevant Masters course. All adds up sadly. Not sure where you're from but in the UK, those kinda courses are £10K a year with no student loans, so you have to have the money upfront :eek2:
 
 
 
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