Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I understand that he had 8% of MPs and therefore couldn't make them free. But why did he personally vote to increase them, whereas other members such as Tim Farron voted against the rise? He had the power to vote against a rise.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    He didn't want to sour on his relationship with the Tories and because he's a ****?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Because he was still so shocked at actually making it into government he thought he had better suck up to the boss.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by james.proctor)
    I understand that he had 8% of MPs and therefore couldn't make them free. But why did he personally vote to increase them, whereas other members such as Tim Farron voted against the rise? He had the power to vote against a rise.
    He couldn't vote against them (or abstain) because they were a policy of the government of which he was a member. Farron was not a member of the government.

    Clegg would have had to have a clause written in to the Coalition Agreement. He says that couldn't be done. Most people, whether Liberal supporters or not, disagree.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Because he's a ****


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    He couldn't vote against them (or abstain) because they were a policy of the government of which he was a member. Farron was not a member of the government.
    This. Also, he voted for a cap of £9000, instead of uncapped fees as originally proposed by the Tories.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    He couldn't vote against them (or abstain) because they were a policy of the government of which he was a member. Farron was not a member of the government.Clegg would have had to have a clause written in to the Coalition Agreement. He says that couldn't be done. Most people, whether Liberal supporters or not, disagree.
    But Nick was able to vote against the Snoopers charter though, right?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by james.proctor)
    But Nick was able to vote against the Snoopers charter though, right?
    No.

    There was nothing in the Coalition Agreement on the subject.

    The 2012 Queen's Speech contained a commitment to publish a draft Communications Data Bill. The Government did that. The Lib Dems didn't like the look of it, declined to support it and so no Bill was ever introduced into Parliament. Therefore Clegg never had an opportunity to vote against it.

    Clearly the Lib Dems changed their mind about the proposal but they did so at a stage when government policy was still in the course of formation.


    Likewise any opposition by Clegg and the other Lib Dem ministers to student fee rises would have had to have been made before the government had decided on its policy. The Coalition Agreement gave an opt out for Lib Dem backbenchers but not ministers. As I said, Clegg argued that couldn't be done. Most people disagree.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.