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    Lol you took a break over the weekend and you have like 2 billion questions to romp through xD
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    (Original post by student2399)
    So i am considering an application to Cambridge for Law next year. I am a Scottish student and this year i am doing my Highers - Maths, English, French, Geography, History, Economics, but i also did Higher Russian last year and got an A. However, i am unsure of which subjects to do next year that would best suit what i want to do and what grades i will need to get in my Highers to be in a good position to apply.

    I am thinking about:

    Advanced Higher Geography
    Advanced Higher History
    A-Level Russian or Advanced Higher English or Advanced Higher Economics
    Crash Higher Spanish

    Any thoughts/advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Great to hear that you're thinking of applying! For Law, we don't really have any preference regarding what subjects candidates may have studied previously at school, whether arts, sciences or a combination of the two. Typical conditional offers for Scottish Highers are AAA at Advanced Higher Grade. Any and all of the subjects you mention would be great preparation for a Law application.
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    (Original post by twenty16app)
    Hi, please tell me your realistic opinion for this... I am thinking of applying for cambridge uni for 2016 entry, so this september.. I'm applying for engineering and I am currently taking IB. I know a lot of you are doing A-Level, but still maybe give me an approximation. Currently I am taking Physics HL, Maths HL, Chinese HL, Art SL, Langlit SL, Econ SL. My predicted grades are not out yet but the teachers say it would be physics-7, maths-6, chinese-7, art-7, langlit-6, econ-6, (maths may go up). So that would be either a 38/42 or 39/42 for PGs. I also did take a-level modules out of school, which I self-studied: M1, M2, FP1.

    I do have an extenuating circumstance of chronic diseases where I could not go to school normally for 2 months. I had endoscopy checkup and lost 13kg. ( but im not sure if this is even relevant,although it did affected my grades)

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    Hi,

    If you think your achievements have been limited by circumstances outside of your control (which it certainly sounds like you have) then we would encourage you to ask a teacher/doctor or other relevant professional to submit an Extenuating Circumstances Form on your behalf. This allows us to assess your achievements in their appropriate context.

    For Engineering, HL maths and physics are essential, which you are studying. Typical conditional offers are for 40-42 points and 776 or 777. We may also add a STEP condition (generally 1 in STEP I), but this decision is taken on a case-by-case basis.

    It is good that you are pursuing maths outside of your schoolwork through A level modules, particular M1 and M2 which are important for Engineering. The majority of applicant to Engineering will be studying A level Further Maths, so it is a good idea to ensure you have a roughly equivalent mathematical understanding as the interviews are very mathematical (particularly mechanics) in nature. At Peterhouse, we ask all our Engineering applicants to sit a short (1 hour) multiple-choice maths test, which has the option to say if you haven't covered a particular area at school yet.
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    (Original post by joe12345marc)
    One thing I worry about is the fact a lot of weight is put onto UMS scores, yet I know as a fact I can get 3 A*s next year in M,FM and Phy yet the chances of me getting an offer of that are low. I think A levels should be a lot harder, so you don't get 100's of applicants with basically the exact same scores. Sometimes, 1 little mistake can lose 5 UMS, which is a lot of the time the difference between someone with an offer and an unsuccessful applicant. Which is how I understand why they give out more maths offers as STEP supposedly filters some applicants out (although on a shadowing experience at Cambridge, I met a girl studying maths in her 2nd year that got 2,2 in her STEP II and III but her offer was 1,1). This leads me nicely onto my main to questions:
    1) Do they do the same for Computer Science with Maths and possibly other degrees that require a STEP result (giving out more offers than places) and therefore is so, do you just fully reject the people that have a Comp Sci w/Maths offer, beat their offer but miss their STEP requirement but a grade?

    2)Can you reject someone if they've received an offer and got the grades? Or is receiving an offer a 100% guarentee of a place if they hit required grades? I say that because, as they offer so many offers with STEP requirements for Maths, what if a much higher than expected proportion of people get the STEP grades? Would you have to reject some or, as I assume, you do give out offers so that if that is the case, they can all be offered a place still?
    Hi,

    1) The first thing it is worth noting is that at Peterhouse, we don't always use the STEP for CompSci offers - we always do for CompSci with Maths, and sometimes we do for CompSci with NatSci. Secondly, the STEP condition (like any other academic condition) may be waived by us come results day, depending on a number of factors including: how close the candidate was to making the grades (we receive copies of the STEP scripts as well, so we can see your working and see if you were close to finding the right answers); how many other people missed their offers last year; which other conditions were met and by how much etc. It may be that if you fail the STEP condition of your offer but you meet the A level (or equivalent) conditions then we'll admit you for the CompSci with NatSci course (which is less mathematical than CompSci with Maths).

    2) Your conditional offer is a legally binding contract, so if you meet all the conditions of your offer then you will be admitted to the College who made that offer. It's as simple as that. How we fit you in is our problem, not yours!
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    (Original post by ceco_moev)
    Dear Admission Tutor,

    I am an EU applicant looking to apply for HSPS in Cam, although it is not offered in Peterhouse. I've got a few questions concerning my application:

    1) Since I've some Math Olympiads accomplishments in the last 5 year, which are unfortunately not really relevant to the course, should I ask my referee to specify them in the reference or just hint to them in my PS or add them in the SAQ?

    2)I've been taking painting classes for several years now and would like to continue with drawing. Do you know whether King's college art classes are available for student from the whole university? Are there similar classes held in other colleges?

    3)Suppose that in the EU referendum UK decide to leave the EU, would this affect my fee given that I will apply this year and if given an offer start studying in 2016?

    I really appreciate answering my questions!!

    Cheers
    Hi!

    I'll try, but we can't be specific to HSPS I'm afraid.

    1) It's always great to hear about candidate's achievements so you might want your teacher to mention them or to include them in one of the sections on the SAQ (e.g. "how is interest for subject maintained?" if you think it is relevant to your decision to study HSPS).
    2) I'm afraid you would have to ask King's. There are over 700 student societies at Cambridge so it's very likely there is something that will suit your interests. If not, you can always set up a society yourself!
    3) Nobody knows yet what will happen and when I'm afraid. I think it would be extremely unfair to chance a student's fee status mid-way through the application process or their course.
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    (Original post by Nife)
    I do Maths, Economics, Biology and RS, do you look closely into UMS scores for maths?
    Maths is a big part of the Economics course so yes, we would look at your UMS scores in Maths A level and you would probably be asked some maths questions at interview. However, you don't necessarily need Further Maths - just a good understanding of the Maths you've covered, and being able to apply it to some real-life Economics problems, will be enough. The Economics course also involves som essay-writing, so be prepared to submit some written work (probably from your RS/Economics A levels) which may also be discussed at interview.
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    (Original post by annzabelle)
    I'm an american taking an AP heavy course load, I'm applying to cambridge in the fall, but I'll only have taken two AP exams relevant to my course(Computer Science with Maths, AP Physics 1 and AP BC Calculus). This is because my state requires 4 years of English courses and 4 years of history courses for a high school diploma. What AP scores would be considered in my application, only the ones relevant to my course, or the three humanities AP's I've taken? Also, my gpa isn't particularly high(3.5 or so), would this reduce my chances of being admitted or does your admissions process reflect that a C in sophmore english has no effect on my success at a Computer Science course.
    Hi,

    Typical conditional offers for students taken APs would be for 5 to be achieved in at least 5 tests. For Computer science with maths we would also ask for 1,1 in STEP II and III. For courses such as this, the main thing which is looked for is your ability at mathematics so we would probably like to see as many mathematics APs as possible. This is also important if you are invited to interview to help you prepare for the maths-based interviews. We're mostly interested in your academic ability and potential relating to the subject you wish to study, so we generally look at APs more than we do gpa, for exactly the reasons you mention.
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    For bio natsci students,is there any benefits to doing further maths?
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    (Original post by odjack)
    Hi, thanks for doing this.

    I am considering applying for MML as I do French and German and the course seems interesting. Out of interest, what has the average UMS average for this course been in recent years? Do you take into account the fact that many native speakers take these A levels and grade boundaries seem to be higher when compared to other subjects?

    Also, as for the 3 most relevant subjects - would History be considered more relevant to the course than Geography? (These are my other two subjects.)
    Great to hear that you're thinking of applying for MML. The average best 3 UMS average for successful applicants over the last two years has been 91% (range 87.8-95.3). We don't get involved in discussions around relative difficulty of various subjects and I must stress that the UMS Merit Score is very far from the only metric we look at and that we look at all exam results in a detailed, module-by-module way. This detailed approach allows us to take account of subjects where a candidate is a native speaker, for example. Such subjects are generally excluded from conditional offers.
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    (Original post by big_dreamer)
    Hello,

    I am going to be in year 12 next year and I will be taking Economics, Maths, French and History at A level and I am thinking of doing Economics or Law in the future. However, I keep hearing that you need FM a level as well to do economics at cambridge and that all applicants have it and it will greatly reduce your chances if you don't have it, is this true?

    Also, I am thinking of teaching myself FM as well or to enrol with the Further mathematics support programme in year 12/13 because I cannot do it at my school due to timetabling/clashing, will this be beneficial?

    Thank you
    Maths is a big part of the Economics course, but you don't necessarily need to have FM to apply for Economics, especially if your school don't offer it/can't offer it alongside your other subjects (there is a space to tell us about this on your SAQ). Further Maths is advantageous to an Economics application (which means we don't insist that you are taking it, but it will increase your chances of getting a place) so picking up a few extra modules will probably help you, but bear in mind that you would probably be asked some maths questions at interview - for this you will need a good understanding of the Maths you've covered, and you will need to be able to apply it to some real-life Economics problems. The Economics course also involves som essay-writing, so be prepared to submit some written work (probably from your Economics/History A levels) which may also be discussed at interview.

    If you end up applying for Law, you won't need Further Maths.
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    (Original post by Peterhouse Admissions)
    Hi,

    Typical conditional offers for students taken APs would be for 5 to be achieved in at least 5 tests. For Computer science with maths we would also ask for 1,1 in STEP II and III. For courses such as this, the main thing which is looked for is your ability at mathematics so we would probably like to see as many mathematics APs as possible. This is also important if you are invited to interview to help you prepare for the maths-based interviews. We're mostly interested in your academic ability and potential relating to the subject you wish to study, so we generally look at APs more than we do gpa, for exactly the reasons you mention.
    Thanks for the reply, I have a few more questions.
    What math is on the STEP? I have a good grounding in calculus but haven't taken statistics(I had to choose between AP compsci and AP statistics). Would it be helpful for me to study some statistics on my own? Should I get an A-level higher maths book to review and fill in topics that I haven't covered?
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    (Original post by annzabelle)
    Thanks for the reply, I have a few more questions.
    What math is on the STEP? I have a good grounding in calculus but haven't taken statistics(I had to choose between AP compsci and AP statistics). Would it be helpful for me to study some statistics on my own? Should I get an A-level higher maths book to review and fill in topics that I haven't covered?
    You dont need to know that much since they allow you to choose questions to account for different syllabuses,
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    (Original post by annzabelle)
    Thanks for the reply, I have a few more questions.
    What math is on the STEP? I have a good grounding in calculus but haven't taken statistics(I had to choose between AP compsci and AP statistics). Would it be helpful for me to study some statistics on my own? Should I get an A-level higher maths book to review and fill in topics that I haven't covered?
    STEP specification here:
    http://www.admissionstestingservice....ep/about-step/

    And TSR's own resources
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2807407
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    Hello, I was reading the math tripos guide and it said that students from other universities can take Part III of the tripos. Can someone quickly run me through how this works? Would one have to do a 3 year BSc at the other university? Thanks.
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    (Original post by Paul Dirac)
    Hello, I was reading the math tripos guide and it said that students from other universities can take Part III of the tripos. Can someone quickly run me through how this works? Would one have to do a 3 year BSc at the other university? Thanks.
    yes. Part III serves as the maths masters degree (styled the M.A.St.) for students who have a bachelor's degree from another university.

    The advantage for students continuing at Cambridge, i.e. from Part II, is that they can do so without graduating, such that they remain eligible for student finance as it is the 4th year of their undergraduate degree. They then graduate at the end of their fourth year with two awards (BA and MMath). For those from elsewhere, they will have had to pick up their undergraduate diplomas, such that they're now ineligible for undergraduate student finance.

    Plainly any British student who is plausibly a candidate for admission to Part III would have the option to do the MMath at his/her own university (Warwick, Oxford...). I wonder then after the profiles of the domestic students who choose to make the switch, and incur the additional costs, are there a lot of them from e.g. Bath and Durham? Because it has to be that your insitution is good enough to prepare but not good enough to compare; this unless you're only moneyed and fancy a change.
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    Hello, thanks for your reply. I have two more questions.

    Is there any possibility of financial aid for students applying from other universities, and what are the conditions for this?

    Are there any statistics that show how many students are accepted for Part III from other universities? (Any ideas about Warwick?)

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Kadak)
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    For bio natsci students,is there any benefits to doing further maths?
    What A levels are you taking?
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    (Original post by Paul Dirac)
    Hello, thanks for your reply. I have two more questions.

    Is there any possibility of financial aid for students applying from other universities, and what are the conditions for this?

    Are there any statistics that show how many students are accepted for Part III from other universities? (Any ideas about Warwick?)

    Thanks
    The information given above is correct - students from other universities can study Part II Maths as a postgraduate course (requirements here). This means that the finance requirements and financial support are the same as for other postgraduate courses offered by the university. There is no specific support available for that course, but general support is available.
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    Hey, I was reading the guide for mathematics applicants pdf guide, and apparently the admissions process is slightly different for each college.

    Some college has an 'applied maths' interview. Can you explain what this is? Is this different from the standard interview in some way? Because I'm not too fond of doing mechanics/statistics and I would rather stick to the pure math questions, so If this is primarily a mechanics/statistics based interview I know which colleges to avoid xD

    Edit: What's the difference between an applied maths interview and a subject interview?
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    (Original post by Peterhouse Admissions)
    What A levels are you taking?


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    Biology,Chemistry, Physics and Single Maths.However Im finding I enjoy maths,so I want to pick up FM maths to at least as next year.
    But is it worth it if I want to apply for bio natsci?
 
 
 
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