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    (Original post by Ilydia)
    Section A: Language Variation and Change

    Section A is designed to elicit candidates’ ability to evaluate ideas and issues about language variation and change by using their knowledge and study and two pieces of data.

    The task will be an essay cue requiring the evaluation of a particular idea, proposition or approach regarding language variation and change.

    The task will present candidates with two pieces of data. These may be spoken or written texts, word lists, graphical or tabular information about language use or a model representing ideas about language.


    Section B: Language Discourses

    Section B is designed to elicit candidates’ ability to evaluate how language and language issues are debated and represented in society.

    The task will present candidates with two passages about a language topic.Candidates will be given texts about language aimed at a popular, non-linguistic audience and they may be given texts from different times.

    The question will ask candidates to:
    • analyse and evaluate how the two texts contribute to a discourse about language, constituting social knowledge about the language issue
    • assess the validity of the views about language in the texts, drawing on their own knowledge and study of language.




    ^^^That is from the specification on the AQA website

    From what I understand, they are very similar but Section A you are looking at 2 texts and discussing how language changes or about the different varieties and in this you will have to evaluate these ideas. On the other hand, Section B will be two texts based on views of language change or variation and you will have to evaluate the writer's views whilst still discussing the knowledge you know on the topic. So, Section B is probably more evaluative and you should say "I disagree with their view..." or something.

    Make sense?
    Yeah so section A is a more structured approach and section B is more application😌

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    (Original post by Ilydia)
    Section A: Language Variation and Change

    Section A is designed to elicit candidates’ ability to evaluate ideas and issues about language variation and change by using their knowledge and study and two pieces of data.

    The task will be an essay cue requiring the evaluation of a particular idea, proposition or approach regarding language variation and change.

    The task will present candidates with two pieces of data. These may be spoken or written texts, word lists, graphical or tabular information about language use or a model representing ideas about language.


    Section B: Language Discourses

    Section B is designed to elicit candidates’ ability to evaluate how language and language issues are debated and represented in society.

    The task will present candidates with two passages about a language topic.Candidates will be given texts about language aimed at a popular, non-linguistic audience and they may be given texts from different times.

    The question will ask candidates to:
    • analyse and evaluate how the two texts contribute to a discourse about language, constituting social knowledge about the language issue
    • assess the validity of the views about language in the texts, drawing on their own knowledge and study of language.




    ^^^That is from the specification on the AQA website

    From what I understand, they are very similar but Section A you are looking at 2 texts and discussing how language changes or about the different varieties and in this you will have to evaluate these ideas. On the other hand, Section B will be two texts based on views of language change or variation and you will have to evaluate the writer's views whilst still discussing the knowledge you know on the topic. So, Section B is probably more evaluative and you should say "I disagree with their view..." or something.

    Make sense?
    So section A you comment on all the knowledge you know on the topic, section B you make your views? And bring in theories for both? Amazing, thank you so much. X


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    does anyone know anything about multicultural london english? if so please could you share your knowledge ?☺️


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    (Original post by may_1)
    does anyone know anything about multicultural london english? if so please could you share your knowledge ?☺️


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    Research about Mark Sebba (MLE) and Sue Fox (MEYD) 😋

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    (Original post by mcbb)
    So section A you comment on all the knowledge you know on the topic, section B you make your views? And bring in theories for both? Amazing, thank you so much. X


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    They are very similar but the text's will be different as Section A will be a transcript/advert etc. and then Section B will be an article/book or something on an issue relating to language but what you put in your answers will be very similar but because Section B is based on opinions, you are therefore more likely to agree/disagree with them. It's ok!
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    (Original post by Liaamm)
    Research about Mark Sebba (MLE) and Sue Fox (MEYD) 😋

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    I thought Sebba was London Jamaican and Fox found MLE is a form of MEYD?
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    (Original post by Ilydia)
    I thought Sebba was London Jamaican and Fox found MLE is a form of MEYD?
    This is correct
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    (Original post by Ilydia)
    I thought Sebba was London Jamaican and Fox found MLE is a form of MEYD?
    Still relevant to multicultural London English are they not? Or am I wrong?

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    I'm so done with this exam 😂 not sure what I'd do without this thread, thank you so much everyone!!!


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    (Original post by mcbb)
    I'm so done with this exam 😂 not sure what I'd do without this thread, thank you so much everyone!!!


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    same im just praying to God it isn't global english or gender


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    (Original post by may_1)
    same im just praying to God it isn't global english or gender


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    Everything other then gender follows the prescriptivist descriptivist debate😊

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    (Original post by may_1)
    same im just praying to God it isn't global english or gender


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    I barely even know what Global English even entails?!!! Here are a list of all the theorists/research my teacher has given us on accent/dialect so see if this helps:

    Accent andDialect researchers and research
    Mark Sebba: London Jamaican, creoles, pidgins
    Sue Fox:Multicultural London English (MLE); young people are more apt
    to code-switch
    Greg Smith:Cockney children gave their own accent low status
    Barrie Rhodes:Young women in Yorkshire speaking like their grandmothers
    Peter Trudgill:hypercorrect grammar with women in Norwich, men went for covert prestige; rural ways of speakingbeing replaced by urban accents
    Malcolm Petyt:h-dropping in Bradford related to social class
    Jennifer Cheshire: Reading study – children’s talk more related to social
    groups than social classes
    Paul Kerswill:Milton Keynes work – children came up with their own way of
    talking; dialect levelling – Estuary English found as far away asReading
    and Milton Keynes
    William Labov:Martha’s Vineyard study; New York department study; Northern Cities VowelShift; restricted code speakers can be intelligent
    Basil Bernstein:elaborated and restricted codes
    Ellen Ryan:status and solidarity
    Howard Giles:capital punishment study; American university students rating British andmiddle-class Americans versus lower class American speakers;
    Kentucky versus standard American; RPand Birmingham speaker
    Lance Workman:Birmingham worse than silence; Yorkshire accent rated higher than RP
    Lord Reith:BBC & RP
    David Rosewarnestuary English
    Lesley Milroy:Belfast study – open and closed networks
    Kevin Watson:Liverpool – no dialect levelling
    Paul Baker:Polari


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    (Original post by mcbb)
    I barely even know what Global English even entails?!!! Here are a list of all the theorists/research my teacher has given us on accent/dialect so see if this helps:

    Accent andDialect researchers and research
    Mark Sebba: London Jamaican, creoles, pidgins
    Sue Fox:Multicultural London English (MLE); young people are more apt
    to code-switch
    Greg Smith:Cockney children gave their own accent low status
    Barrie Rhodes:Young women in Yorkshire speaking like their grandmothers
    Peter Trudgill:hypercorrect grammar with women in Norwich, men went for covert prestige; rural ways of speakingbeing replaced by urban accents
    Malcolm Petyt:h-dropping in Bradford related to social class
    Jennifer Cheshire: Reading study – children’s talk more related to social
    groups than social classes
    Paul Kerswill:Milton Keynes work – children came up with their own way of
    talking; dialect levelling – Estuary English found as far away asReading
    and Milton Keynes
    William Labov:Martha’s Vineyard study; New York department study; Northern Cities VowelShift; restricted code speakers can be intelligent
    Basil Bernstein:elaborated and restricted codes
    Ellen Ryan:status and solidarity
    Howard Giles:capital punishment study; American university students rating British andmiddle-class Americans versus lower class American speakers;
    Kentucky versus standard American; RPand Birmingham speaker
    Lance Workman:Birmingham worse than silence; Yorkshire accent rated higher than RP
    Lord Reith:BBC & RP
    David Rosewarnestuary English
    Lesley Milroy:Belfast study – open and closed networks
    Kevin Watson:Liverpool – no dialect levelling
    Paul Baker:Polari

    I think I posted an A* answer on global English a few pages back😊

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    (Original post by may_1)
    same im just praying to God it isn't global english or gender


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    Take a look at this power point on pidgins and creoles too hun, it might help x
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: ppt pidgins creoles 1.ppt (1.05 MB, 198 views)
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    Please could someone also just clarify Jean Aitchison's model on the damp spoon, crumbling castle and infectious disease when describing prescriptivists' views? I find them hard to differentiate
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    (Original post by mcbb)
    Please could someone also just clarify Jean Aitchison's model on the damp spoon, crumbling castle and infectious disease when describing prescriptivists' views? I find them hard to differentiate
    The crumbling castle represents English in a way that suggests it needs repair and preservation. It also suggests that there was once a 'golden age' of English where the metaphorical castle was intact. Aitchison states that there was never a golden age and that people have always had a prescriptivist view towards language no matter what period, as they always saw the current state of language as inferior to that of the past.

    The damp spoon suggest that language is in danger due to lazinessand sloppy use of its speakers. Aitchison says that the only lazy speech is drunk speech. Here she means that speech is not lazy, just it doesnt appeal to those of a prescriptivist view, and that the only true lazy speech is drunken speech.

    The infectious disease suggests that language changes spread like disease and insinuates that they are detrimental to the overall 'health' of English and we should fight against these changes. Aitchison stated that people only adopt changes that they want to, such as to fit in social groups so there is no need to combat these changes.
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    (Original post by MisterGroger)
    The crumbling castle represents English in a way that suggests it needs repair and preservation. It also suggests that there was once a 'golden age' of English where the metaphorical castle was intact. Aitchison states that there was never a golden age and that people have always had a prescriptivist view towards language no matter what period, as they always saw the current state of language as inferior to that of the past.

    The damp spoon suggest that language is in danger due to lazinessand sloppy use of its speakers. Aitchison says that the only lazy speech is drunk speech. Here she means that speech is not lazy, just it doesnt appeal to those of a prescriptivist view, and that the only true lazy speech is drunken speech.

    The infectious disease suggests that language changes spread like disease and insinuates that they are detrimental to the overall 'health' of English and we should fight against these changes. Aitchison stated that people only adopt changes that they want to, such as to fit in social groups so there is no need to combat these changes.
    Perfect! Thank you!
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    Does anyone have an essay structure for political correctness💭

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    would it be ok to just revise language change for Section A? because there are too many variation theorists to learn for the question on language variation.
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    (Original post by PR1234)
    would it be ok to just revise language change for Section A? because there are too many variation theorists to learn for the question on language variation.
    Personally, I'm doing this. I know change a lot better than variation and find it more interesting. Apparently some colleges do tell you to do change, but the gamble is if the change question is particularly difficult this year.
 
 
 
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