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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    Something like they were hoping that in a few hours the army of the enemy would perish

    Even the bravest were asking who could defend the city now

    The crowd was so large that many were injured

    The feared that the enemy would overpower the guards

    Can't remember the first sentence..
    I put: Tanta turba erat ut multi cives vulnarentur

    Etiam fortissemes rogabant qui urbem iam defendere posset

    Timebant ne hostes custodes superarent

    Sperabant paucis horis exercitum hostium peritus esse
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    Does anyone know how to nail 100% the literature paper?
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    (Original post by M101m)
    I put: Tanta turba erat ut multi cives vulnarentur

    Etiam fortissemes rogabant qui urbem iam defendere posset

    Timebant ne hostes custodes superarent

    Sperabant paucis horis exercitum hostium peritus esse
    I put the result clause into a perfect subjunctive but you have done imperfect subjunctive. I think it could be either, but from memory when it is a completed action it goes into the perfect.
    Stupidly missed out posset because i didn't know how to conjugate it
    For the last one, i that not a hope for the future? therefore using the present subjunctive??
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    Here is my Cicero translation:
    When I was not only suspecting these things, but I was clearly seeing them(for they were not managed secretly), I said in the senate that I would be a popular consul. For what is there as popular as freedom? You see that this is sought not only by all men but even by wild animals and it is placed ahead of all matters. What is there as popular as peace? A thing which is so popular that you think very great troubles need to be undertaken, if eventually you can be in peace.
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    (Original post by Ladondapull)
    Jdjd
    Alright lad? How did you find the Latin exam then?
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    (Original post by stripedbox)
    Alright lad? How did you find the Latin exam then?
    I think I nailed it wbu?
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    (Original post by james..michael)
    I put the result clause into a perfect subjunctive but you have done imperfect subjunctive. I think it could be either, but from memory when it is a completed action it goes into the perfect.
    Stupidly missed out posset because i didn't know how to conjugate it
    For the last one, i that not a hope for the future? therefore using the present subjunctive??
    Perfect subjunctive (according to the rules I have) may (note the may) be used if 'the result is sudden or instantaneous', but most of the time for any past (other than something like 'I have had' instead of 'I had') the imperfect subjunctive is best.

    For a verb of promising, you should use a future infinitive, as said in my section on indirect statements. Could you explain why you would think to use subjunctive (it's been a while since I really looked at the rules I have, so I don't know if there's something about this somewhere else)? Also note that the infinitive used here is not in the correct case.
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    (Original post by Ladondapull)
    I think I nailed it wbu?
    I don't know tbf. Happy though
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    (Original post by stripedbox)
    I don't know tbf. Happy though
    Good on u🙌🏿
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    (Original post by Ladondapull)
    Here is my Cicero translation:
    When I was not only suspecting these things, but I was clearly seeing them(for they were not managed secretly), I said in the senate that I would be a popular consul. For what is there as popular as freedom? You see that this is sought not only by all men but even by wild animals and it is placed ahead of all matters. What is there as popular as peace? A thing which is so popular that you think very great troubles need to be undertaken, if eventually you can be in peace.
    I translated gerebantur as 'carried out', because I couldn't think of a better translation; 'managed' is much better, though. I translated otium as 'leisure', not 'peace'.
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    I wanna know how everyone's preparing for the lit exam? If you're even gunna bother?
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    (Original post by fablereader)
    I translated gerebantur as 'carried out', because I couldn't think of a better translation; 'managed' is much better, though. I translated otium as 'leisure', not 'peace'.
    They all seem like sensible translations👍🏿
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    (Original post by stripedbox)
    I wanna know how everyone's preparing for the lit exam? If you're even gunna bother?
    I haven't yet but I'm starting this weekend!
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    So the perfect subjunctive is wrong? From my text book it says that when it is a continuous action in the past the imperfect subjunctive is used but when it is completed in the past, the perfect subjunctive is used
    From my textbook any wish or hope for the future uses the present subjunctive. I think this is what they were getting at. I can't see the indirect statement?
    Also doesn't fortissimus go like bonus/a/um so in this case it would be fortissimi??
    I'm also not sure about last sentence, I can't remember it being 'the army of the enemy' can anyone remember what it is?
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    Hopefully, forte, I will get an A
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    (Original post by james..michael)
    So the perfect subjunctive is wrong? From my text book it says that when it is a continuous action in the past the imperfect subjunctive is used but when it is completed in the past, the perfect subjunctive is used
    From my textbook any wish or hope for the future uses the present subjunctive. I think this is what they were getting at. I can't see the indirect statement?
    Also doesn't fortissimus go like bonus/a/um so in this case it would be fortissimi??
    I'm also not sure about last sentence, I can't remember it being 'the army of the enemy' can anyone remember what it is?
    I'm not sure about the perfect subjunctive. It probably depends on what the people who look over the exam think about it. I would probably be fine with using a perfect subjunctive (the sentence can be interpreted either way), but I'm no exam marker.

    We probably have different rule books. Do you know what section this comment about the present subjunctive was in?

    You're right about fortissimus, too, I didn't notice that.
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    Ok i think i just got it wrong, it is an indirect statement. It is only when utinam is present that it is considered a "wish for the future".
    I remember the first question was 'when something happened". I completely forgot about *** clauses so i got the first part of the sentence wrong. Will i get any marks for saying Quando for when?

    1. when (something happened),they left now from the forum
    Quando (not using subjunctive) , nunc ab foro discesserunt
    2. So great was the crowd that many citizens were wounded
    Turba tanta erat ut multos cives vulnerati sint
    3. Even the strongest were asking who could now defend the city
    Etiam fortissimi rogabant quis nunc defendere urbem (missing out posse)
    4. They were fearing that the enemy would overpower the guards
    Timebant ne hostem (maybe this should be in nominitive?) custodes superarent
    5. They hoped that … would perish
    Speraverunt (all of sentence right expect wrong use of verb)
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    (Original post by james..michael)
    Ok i think i just got it wrong, it is an indirect statement. It is only when utinam is present that it is considered a "wish for the future".
    I remember the first question was 'when something happened". I completely forgot about *** clauses so i got the first part of the sentence wrong. Will i get any marks for saying Quando for when?

    1. when (something happened),they left now from the forum
    Quando (not using subjunctive) , nunc ab foro discesserunt
    2. So great was the crowd that many citizens were wounded
    Turba tanta erat ut multos cives vulnerati sint
    3. Even the strongest were asking who could now defend the city
    Etiam fortissimi rogabant quis nunc defendere urbem (missing out posse)
    4. They were fearing that the enemy would overpower the guards
    Timebant ne hostem (maybe this should be in nominitive?) custodes superarent
    5. They hoped that … would perish
    Speraverunt (all of sentence right expect wrong use of verb)
    Also if i said "on account of so many victories they yielded many cities to the romans" in the translation, how many marks would i lose- just a minor or is that right?
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    (Original post by james..michael)
    Also if i said "on account of so many victories they yielded many cities to the romans" in the translation, how many marks would i lose- just a minor or is that right?
    Well, you translated the words right, but just got mixed up with their order. I would think that you still conveyed the meaning of the sentence, so I think it is a bit uncertain whether it would be counted as major or minor. Looking at a mark scheme, they count 'wrong case' as a major error, but even if the exam marker counts that as a major error it would lose at most only 1 point.
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    (Original post by james..michael)
    Ok i think i just got it wrong, it is an indirect statement. It is only when utinam is present that it is considered a "wish for the future".
    I remember the first question was 'when something happened". I completely forgot about *** clauses so i got the first part of the sentence wrong. Will i get any marks for saying Quando for when?

    1. when (something happened),they left now from the forum
    Quando (not using subjunctive) , nunc ab foro discesserunt
    2. So great was the crowd that many citizens were wounded
    Turba tanta erat ut multos cives vulnerati sint
    3. Even the strongest were asking who could now defend the city
    Etiam fortissimi rogabant quis nunc defendere urbem (missing out posse)
    4. They were fearing that the enemy would overpower the guards
    Timebant ne hostem (maybe this should be in nominitive?) custodes superarent
    5. They hoped that … would perish
    Speraverunt (all of sentence right expect wrong use of verb)
    Ah, I've found the utinam area of my rules, and I can understand why you would think a subjunctive. However, I do believe they were looking for an indirect statement, so that might have an impact on your score.

    They probably were looking for a '***' clause, but so long as it is a correct translation I should think they would accept it.

    For English-to-Latin last year, they still gave six marks if you had only one error, so if everything else is right the omission of 'could' still means you might get all six marks. However, I feel that 'quis' is more of an interrogative, so I'm not sure how that would be accepted. 'qui' would be much better. Plus, 'quis' is only singular, while 'qui' is both singular and plural. That might have an effect, it might not.

    'hostem' should definitely be nominative, but again it is only one error. If I were an exam marker, I would give six marks for this question (but I'm not; my info relies on mark schemes and my own feelings).
 
 
 
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