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    (Original post by james..michael)
    I think "of the romans" is a wrong translation as it was "romanis" implying that it is dative or ablative". "encouraged by fear", was this really there? i remember there being one word not two. "As soon as the soldiers found out they were to welcome him" are you sure this was correct? i don't think the sentence was that long was it??
    I meant to type encouraged by anger, not fear. Hortum was followed by a word meaning anger. I don't think 'encouraged' is right though.


    There was recepi-something at the end of that sentence, so that's where I got welcome(or perhaps it should be received) from.
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    I meant to type encouraged by anger, not fear. Hortum was followed by a word meaning anger. I don't think 'encouraged' is right though.


    There was recepi-something at the end of that sentence, so that's where I got welcome(or perhaps it should be received) from.
    to be honest i thought you did well, only i couple of mistakes, some minors-some majors. will be around 60/70 or above. Well done
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    (Original post by james..michael)
    In bold are the bits i don't know!
    On the third day after the battle Pereus Arrived in (citybeginning with A). Having followed him the romans prepared a camp not far away.On account of so many victories they yielded many cities to the Romans (this sentence is muddled up). Theothers, metu victae (had no idea how totranslate), prepared to do the same. However the legates, having been sentby pereus to the nearest city to ask help for the battle, could not persuadethem. Therefore Pereus having calledtogether the citezens made a speech, as soon as (loqui) (another word) (Iknew loqui was to speak but I didn’t know the other word) tears disruptedhim. Therefore he asked his friend to read it for him. All the citizens,although they were also crying having caught sight of the king with tears, didnot want to listen to his friend. They shouted (a word I didn’t know) “go away, lest we also perish on account ofyou. (horum?) Anger overwhelmed thefriend. Then these are fragments of the next bitsThe king left to his ship At the same time the rest of the soldiers (some wordbeginning with d)He fled alone When the king entered A(name of city) all of the citizensmarched to him so that he would understand that pereus was now an enemy among hiscitizens (missed velut)
    I think the city is Amphipolis. I translated 'metu victae' as 'defeated by fear'. I translated 'legates' as 'envoys'. I think 'nearest city' was actually plural. I think he began to speak. The soldiers returned to their homes, I think. The king did not enter Amphipolis, the Roman general did.

    That's my first-impression commentary on this. The others I don't know.
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    Seems like most people did the English to Latin...
    Does anyone remember the Cicero?
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    (Original post by stripedbox)
    Seems like most people did the English to Latin...
    Does anyone remember the Cicero?
    I did that. I can remember snippets, but not the whole thing. I think someone else talked about it earlier, check the posts.
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    (Original post by fablereader)
    I think the city is Amphipolis. I translated 'metu victae' as 'defeated by fear'. I translated 'legates' as 'envoys'. I think 'nearest city' was actually plural. I think he began to speak. The soldiers returned to their homes, I think. The king did not enter Amphipolis, the Roman general did.

    That's my first-impression commentary on this. The others I don't know.
    Hey can you look at my translation on the previous page please? How many marks do you think I'd have lost?
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    Hey can you look at my translation on the previous page please? How many marks do you think I'd have lost?
    Maybe tomorrow. Right now I'm studying for Maths exam tomorrow and a whole lot of other stuff the next week. Plus, take into account that I am no exam marker, I only have access to last year's mark scheme which helps, and I am assuming that my translation is right. Mine might not be correct in some places (I think it is correct, I am very confident in my translation, but pride comes before the fall).
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    I'm sure you would, but think they were testing understanding of *** clauses so they might award 5/6? But if it's correct they should award full marks not sure
    are you sure it was "in a few hours the army of the enemy"???? i have no recollection of this
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    Does anyone remember the wording for the indirect statement in the english to latin section??
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    (Original post by fablereader)
    Maybe tomorrow. Right now I'm studying for Maths exam tomorrow and a whole lot of other stuff the next week. Plus, take into account that I am no exam marker, I only have access to last year's mark scheme which helps, and I am assuming that my translation is right. Mine might not be correct in some places (I think it is correct, I am very confident in my translation, but pride comes before the fall).
    Fair enough
    (Original post by james..michael)
    are you sure it was "in a few hours the army of the enemy"???? i have no recollection of this
    Yes I am
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    (Original post by g30rgey132)
    I think I got something similar... I messed up the Cicero big time🔫.... If u miss a word out in translation you lose a mark don't you ??
    Depends on the word - if it's like a hic/ille or something, it may just be counted as a minor error, so no, but if it's another word then probably >-<

    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    I put something like 'he understood that Perseus was like an enemy amongst his own citizens'
    oh **** is velut a contracted form of veluti or something??!??!?!?!?!? ughhhhhhhhh latin whyyyyy
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    (Original post by roarchika)
    Depends on the word - if it's like a hic/ille or something, it may just be counted as a minor error, so no, but if it's another word then probably >-<



    oh **** is velut a contracted form of veluti or something??!??!?!?!?!? ughhhhhhhhh latin whyyyyy
    veluti is an alternative form of velut. I translate them both as 'just as, like'.
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    Which parts of the Cicero and Ovid do you think is likely to come up in the Lit exam?
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    Which parts of the Cicero and Ovid do you think is likely to come up in the Lit exam?
    whats the best way to prepare for it?
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    (Original post by stripedbox)
    whats the best way to prepare for it?
    Learn the translation and go over the analysis beforehand. I think if you know the text well,even without going over the style notes, you'd be able to think on your feet in the exam.

    The only questions I'm worried about are the context/historical ones. I remember doing practice questions and came across this 10 marker asking me to label a map of the Mediterranean! Don't think anything like that would come up though
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    Fair enough


    Yes I am
    I know you're sure. But i don't remember doing a "time when ablative" structure. I think it must've been something else.
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    Learn the translation and go over the analysis beforehand. I think if you know the text well,even without going over the style notes, you'd be able to think on your feet in the exam.

    The only questions I'm worried about are the context/historical ones. I remember doing practice questions and came across this 10 marker asking me to label a map of the Mediterranean! Don't think anything like that would come up though
    Label a map of the Mediterranean? That's really interesting. I've never come up with anything like it. I half-want to do it. I think the ten-pointers are more theme and character essays rather than context and historical, though.

    I agree though. Memorize the translation, analyze the text for thematic and character points. Note particularly odd style points. My tutor recommends especially learning style points in similes for Homer, so you might want to do the same for Ovid (although that might be a bit much, so maybe just do style essays for the similes and make notes beforehand so you'll half-know them). Make sure you know what kind of style points you can write about, but don't go overboard trying to memorize every single style point.
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    I always get mixed up on what's content and what's style???!!!
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    (Original post by stripedbox)
    I always get mixed up on what's content and what's style???!!!
    Style is noting features of language. For example similes, anaphora, position of certain words etc.. and how they help convey meaning or emphasise a certain point.
    Content is simply what is written. The 10 marker is usually content based and about a specific theme or character. 8 markers are usually looking for a mixture of style and content
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    Anyone else planning to drop Latin at AS? I feel to sad dropping it after doing it for three years lol
 
 
 
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