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    1.Does a 3 year have a higher workload or more hours/classes?
    2.Do they have similar curriculum?
    3.Would the 3 year require more intelligence/being able to understand thing quicker?

    (Possible answer?)I think its because Ireland has a "TRY OUT" year where you try out all the different types of engineering?

    3 year course in Queen's Belfast:

    http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/StudyatQue...ineering/H600/

    4 year course in NUI Galway:

    http://www.nuigalway.ie/courses/unde...gineering.html

    Thanks
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    You're right, it's because the first year just provides a very general foundation for engineering. The first year content of most courses will be similar to NUI Galway's year 2 content.
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    (Original post by HandmadeTurnip)
    You're right, it's because the first year just provides a very general foundation for engineering. The first year content of most courses will be similar to NUI Galway's year 2 content.
    Thanks for answering!

    So if i was %100 sure on what type of engineering I would like to do there's no point of that extra year?
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    (Original post by MatthewRooney)
    Thanks for answering!

    So if i was %100 sure on what type of engineering I would like to do there's no point of that extra year?
    Not really, you'd be fine going straight into the year 2 stuff if you've studied Maths and Physics at school. The year 1 content kind of looks similar to the stuff you would study for a foundation year, though it's difficult to tell without more detailed descriptions of the modules.

    EDIT: After doing a bit of research, it seems that having a common first year for different engineering courses is kind of standard in Ireland so it might be difficult to avoid it if you go to any university there.
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    Thanks for the effort, I was thinking of Queens Uni which is in Northern Ireland. It seems to be standard that in the UK it only takes 3 years on %90 of BEng courses? Funny! I recon if I can be sure on the type of engineering and study hard with my maths and physics I could save myself an extra year. Although, You guys have on average 3 subjects...we as Rep. of Ireland has 6 in less detail? Which means my Physics course is less detailed then the A-levels one... perhaps this would be the reason?
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    (Original post by MatthewRooney)
    Thanks for the effort, I was thinking of Queens Uni which is in Northern Ireland. It seems to be standard that in the UK it only takes 3 years on %90 of BEng courses? Funny! I recon if I can be sure on the type of engineering and study hard with my maths and physics I could save myself an extra year. Although, You guys have on average 3 subjects...we as Rep. of Ireland has 6 in less detail? Which means my Physics course is less detailed then the A-levels one... perhaps this would be the reason?
    Four years is standard for a Bachelor's in Scotland as well but three years is the norm for the rest of the UK, as far as I'm aware. Having to do more subjects in less detail at school could well be the reason for the extra year, I think Scottish Highers also tend to involve more subjects than A-levels.

    If you're able to meet the entry requirements for a university outside of Ireland, they'll obviously think you're capable of doing a three year course.
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    (Original post by HandmadeTurnip)
    Four years is standard for a Bachelor's in Scotland as well but three years is the norm for the rest of the UK, as far as I'm aware. Having to do more subjects in less detail at school could well be the reason for the extra year, I think Scottish Highers also tend to involve more subjects than A-levels.

    If you're able to meet the entry requirements for a university outside of Ireland, they'll obviously think you're capable of doing a three year course.
    Yeah! Queens has higher maths standards at a B2 when most Irish are no higher than a C3!
 
 
 
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