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    Hey, I'm currently finishing my A-Levels for Business Studies, Maths (with Statistics) and Economics. I've applied for an Economics degree in Netherlands and I've been given an offer. My problem is, I absolutely don't want to be studying Economics. I do find it relatively interesting, I'm good at it and it goes well with my multilingual abilities, but I'm very certain I'd absolutely love medicine and that's what I want to do. There is no way for me to not do the Economics degree, but I was just wondering if anyone has any experience/knows anyone with the experience of entirely switching their career around?

    P.S I'm currently 17, 18 next year in April if that helps in any way
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    (Original post by Kessidy)
    Hey, I'm currently finishing my A-Levels for Business Studies, Maths (with Statistics) and Economics. I've applied for an Economics degree in Netherlands and I've been given an offer. My problem is, I absolutely don't want to be studying Economics. I do find it relatively interesting, I'm good at it and it goes well with my multilingual abilities, but I'm very certain I'd absolutely love medicine and that's what I want to do. There is no way for me to not do the Economics degree, but I was just wondering if anyone has any experience/knows anyone with the experience of entirely switching their career around?

    P.S I'm currently 17, 18 next year in April if that helps in any way
    What makes you say this?

    Have you done any work experience in medicine? I'm just interested to see what your motivations are.

    There are foundation degrees in medicine which have been designed specifically for people with the wrong A levels. I think it would be worth looking into them before embarking on a totally unrelated course for the next three years.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    What makes you say this?

    Have you done any work experience in medicine? I'm just interested to see what your motivations are.

    There are foundation degrees in medicine which have been designed specifically for people with the wrong A levels. I think it would be worth looking into them before embarking on a totally unrelated course for the next three years.
    No, I haven't done any medicine-related work experience. I've never had the opportunity to choose my education. My parents own a company, so as you can expect, they've been making decisions for me for as long as I can remember.
    Before starting A-Levels I was very good at Physics and top of class in Biology (i didn't do GCSE, i did something else, for which the level is higher). I often just research online and watch surgery videos, I'm absolutely fascinated by this. I just think that the world could really use more doctors, and we have enough theoretical Economists, because honestly, anyone can do economics. It would be such a waste for me to not do medicine, because I am not grossed out by anything human and I really need a purpose in life, because it is so hard to keep motivated when you pretty much hate what you're doing.

    Thank you for the advice, I will look into that. I don't think I'll be able to confront my parents and go for a Foundation programme this year though. They are absolutely keen on me going to university at 17. I know it sounds stupid, but that's just my situation.
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    (Original post by Kessidy)
    No, I haven't done any medicine-related work experience. I've never had the opportunity to choose my education. My parents own a company, so as you can expect, they've been making decisions for me for as long as I can remember.
    Before starting A-Levels I was very good at Physics and top of class in Biology (i didn't do GCSE, i did something else, for which the level is higher). I often just research online and watch surgery videos, I'm absolutely fascinated by this. I just think that the world could really use more doctors, and we have enough theoretical Economists, because honestly, anyone can do economics. It would be such a waste for me to not do medicine, because I am not grossed out by anything human and I really need a purpose in life, because it is so hard to keep motivated when you pretty much hate what you're doing.

    Thank you for the advice, I will look into that. I don't think I'll be able to confront my parents and go for a Foundation programme this year though. They are absolutely keen on me going to university at 17. I know it sounds stupid, but that's just my situation.
    First of all I suggest you actually do work experience in a medical field - try and shadow a doctor. You really need to know what you want if you want to do medicine. (Also med schools more or less expect some sort of medical career exploration).

    Sadly you must do Chemistry and or Biology otherwise I doubt that you will even be interviewed for medicine. Medical schools are competitive you know.

    The realistic option is to either to do a Foundation programme or take a gap year to cram in a chemistry A-level as a private candidate. There is probably like 95% chance that you are not going to get interviewed with your current a-level choices if you want to go to med school at 17.

    Also Graduate Entry Medicine could be harder to get in with an economics degree compared to most life science graduate applicants. GEM is by far way more competitive than undergraduate medicine. And by the way, if you are an international and want to study in the uk you would probably find the competition ratios 20 times more competitive than if you were a uk home student.

    So...find out about medicine fully through work exp. Then either learn chemistry in a gap year and apply, or directly apply to a foundation programme if you really want to do medicine.

    Also you don't always have to please your parents all the time you know.
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    (Original post by solarplexus)
    First of all I suggest you actually do work experience in a medical field - try and shadow a doctor. You really need to know what you want if you want to do medicine. (Also med schools more or less expect some sort of medical career exploration).

    Sadly you must do Chemistry and or Biology otherwise I doubt that you will even be interviewed for medicine. Medical schools are competitive you know.

    The realistic option is to either to do a Foundation programme or take a gap year to cram in a chemistry A-level as a private candidate. There is probably like 95% chance that you are not going to get interviewed with your current a-level choices if you want to go to med school at 17.

    Also Graduate Entry Medicine could be harder to get in with an economics degree compared to most life science graduate applicants. GEM is by far way more competitive than undergraduate medicine. And by the way, if you are an international and want to study in the uk you would probably find the competition ratios 20 times more competitive than if you were a uk home student.

    So...find out about medicine fully through work exp. Then either learn chemistry in a gap year and apply, or directly apply to a foundation programme if you really want to do medicine.

    Also you don't always have to please your parents all the time you know.
    Thanks for the advice=)
    Yes, I'm international, but I'm only studying in UK cause education abroad looks good on uni applications.
    I know what I'm asking for is quite unrealistic, so tbh I think I'll stick with my economics degree, and then maybe try to figure sth out in the process or after it.
    (I wasn't even hoping of going to medical school at 17, I was mainly wondering if it is realistic to get into medical school when you're 20-something and have an entirely unrelated career.)
    I will definitely try and cram in some experience and research more options in the next 3 years of uni.

    I know I don't have to, sadly I've understood that I can do things by myself a bit too late. I know it sounds very stupid, but its just the way I've been raised and the mentality that has been implemented into my mind from a young age. I am quite dissapointed at myself for not standing up for my choices sooner.
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    (Original post by Kessidy)
    Hey, I'm currently finishing my A-Levels for Business Studies, Maths (with Statistics) and Economics. I've applied for an Economics degree in Netherlands and I've been given an offer. My problem is, I absolutely don't want to be studying Economics. I do find it relatively interesting, I'm good at it and it goes well with my multilingual abilities, but I'm very certain I'd absolutely love medicine and that's what I want to do. There is no way for me to not do the Economics degree, but I was just wondering if anyone has any experience/knows anyone with the experience of entirely switching their career around?

    P.S I'm currently 17, 18 next year in April if that helps in any way
    Well I did!

    Back in 2013, I had an offer to study Classics at UCL (random, I know). All my A levels were in non-scientific subjects. I was a bit like you: I was fascinated by the human body even though I hadn't really studied it much. I wanted to do something with my life where I knew I would be fulfilled and I knew medicine would provide that.
    I declined the UCL offer, took a gap year where I did some travelling and some all-important work experience (it'd be silly not to get W/E. You need to make sure you're making the right decision) and now I'm doing an access to medicine course at a local college. I'm coming up to the end of it now, and despite all the people telling me how difficult it will be and how mad I am for making such a drastic decision, I am off to study medicine at King's this September!

    If you want it enough, there is absolutely nothing stopping you. One thing I would say is it certainly won't be easy. Do your research, get some work experience, look into your options, knuckle down and persist! I hope it all works out for you! If you have any questions, just ask
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    Would like to point out graduate entry courses only have a handful of places in the country for international students.
    If you do a different degree now you will struggle much more to do medicine later than if you did foundation year/access courses or just took a year out to do the correct A levels.

    One of my biggest regrets as a teenager was not taking a year out to figure out what I wanted to do, instead of blindly jumping in to the first thing that can to hand.
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    (Original post by Alimbo95)
    Well I did!

    Back in 2013, I had an offer to study Classics at UCL (random, I know). All my A levels were in non-scientific subjects. I was a bit like you: I was fascinated by the human body even though I hadn't really studied it much. I wanted to do something with my life where I knew I would be fulfilled and I knew medicine would provide that.
    I declined the UCL offer, took a gap year where I did some travelling and some all-important work experience (it'd be silly not to get W/E. You need to make sure you're making the right decision) and now I'm doing an access to medicine course at a local college. I'm coming up to the end of it now, and despite all the people telling me how difficult it will be and how mad I am for making such a drastic decision, I am off to study medicine at King's this September!

    If you want it enough, there is absolutely nothing stopping you. One thing I would say is it certainly won't be easy. Do your research, get some work experience, look into your options, knuckle down and persist! I hope it all works out for you! If you have any questions, just ask
    This is so inspirational, thank you!!!
    Do you mind me asking how old are you? And how long did you do the access course for?
    I am 17 and I feel that if I take a foundation course I will be much older than most students at university. If it's just a year course than it should not be a problem though.

    Seriously, thank you so much for your reply, it means the world to me knowing that it is possible to do what I want to do.
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    (Original post by Zorg)
    Would like to point out graduate entry courses only have a handful of places in the country for international students.
    If you do a different degree now you will struggle much more to do medicine later than if you did foundation year/access courses or just took a year out to do the correct A levels.

    One of my biggest regrets as a teenager was not taking a year out to figure out what I wanted to do, instead of blindly jumping in to the first thing that can to hand.
    Thank you for the info =) I will definitely look more into access/foundation courses.

    Do you happen to know if doing foundation is better than re-doing A levels? (I honestly wouldn't want to spend another 2 years doing A Levels in a college, I'd much rather study in a uni environment.)
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    (Original post by Kessidy)
    This is so inspirational, thank you!!!
    Do you mind me asking how old are you? And how long did you do the access course for?
    I am 17 and I feel that if I take a foundation course I will be much older than most students at university. If it's just a year course than it should not be a problem though.

    Seriously, thank you so much for your reply, it means the world to me knowing that it is possible to do what I want to do.
    I'm glad to hear that! It really is possible, but it all comes down to you.

    I am 19 at the moment, so I will be starting uni at 20 which is older than most people who will be coming straight out of school, but especially with medicine, there are a wide range of ages. Not everyone gets in the first time etc, so it's common to find 19/20 year old first years.

    The access course I am doing is 1 year long and it's at Lambeth college in London. Not the best access course, but it got the job done! In order to do an access course, I believe you do need to be at least 19 because it's aimed at 'mature students'.

    If you're not quite prepared to wait until you're 19, have a look at the foundation courses at the universities of Lancaster and Bradford. They do a similar 1 year programme, but I think you're guaranteed an interview with their partner medical schools (Lancaster/Liverpool and Leeds respectively).

    Any more questions, fire them my way !
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    (Original post by Kessidy)
    Thank you for the info =) I will definitely look more into access/foundation courses.

    Do you happen to know if doing foundation is better than re-doing A levels? (I honestly wouldn't want to spend another 2 years doing A Levels in a college, I'd much rather study in a uni environment.)
    Depends on where you want to apply to and what they accept.
    Foundation courses are widening access courses provided by universities for under privileged children, as an international/EU student I don't know that you would qualify. Do check this though.
    Access courses are separate courses which one would need to excel at and use to make an application to medical schools, some accept specific courses and not others so check with the medical schools what they will and won't take from you.

    My advice to you would be to take 3 A levels and get work experience alongside it. I would double check that taking 6 a levels over 4 years would be acceptable, to medical schools, but as you will be taking a whole set of 3 afterwards I can't imagine it being a huge problem.

    If you genuinely want to do medicine and do not do everything to get in as a school leaver, I can guarantee you will be kicking yourself as a graduate. Going to uni can wait and having the uni experience really isn't all it's cracked up to be.
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    (Original post by Zorg)
    Depends on where you want to apply to and what they accept.
    Foundation courses are widening access courses provided by universities for under privileged children, as an international/EU student I don't know that you would qualify. Do check this though.
    Those are foundation courses for people with science A levels who may be less privileged, but the OP does not have science A levels, so would not be able to apply to that type of foundation course.

    OP, you can apply to places like Manchester and Dundee who accept students with non science A levels which has nothing to do with your socio-economic background.
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    (Original post by Kessidy)
    Hey, I'm currently finishing my A-Levels for Business Studies, Maths (with Statistics) and Economics. I've applied for an Economics degree in Netherlands and I've been given an offer. My problem is, I absolutely don't want to be studying Economics. I do find it relatively interesting, I'm good at it and it goes well with my multilingual abilities, but I'm very certain I'd absolutely love medicine and that's what I want to do. There is no way for me to not do the Economics degree, but I was just wondering if anyone has any experience/knows anyone with the experience of entirely switching their career around?

    P.S I'm currently 17, 18 next year in April if that helps in any way
    It's definitely possible! I studied business and I got a master in management from France several years and now I'm gonna start med school in September here in the UK. UK universities consider EU students the same way as UK students (very much appreciated!) So whatever you decide, a turnaround is possible. Just make sure if you decide to go for economics that you obtain at least something equivalent to 2.1 at the end, so the academic criteria will not be an issue, once you want to try for medicine.
 
 
 
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