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Are Conservatives psychopaths? Watch

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    As a companion thread to the "Are socialists psychopaths?".

    And the answer is; of course not (though there is research that suggests wealth can reduce compassion). But fundamentally, the ideology of conservatism itself is not psychopathic, nor is socialism.

    The suggestion that socialists (or indeed conservatives) are psychopaths suggests vaguely sociopathic tendencies in and of itself, in that it appears unable to empathise with and understand why people on the left might hold the views they do.

    I'm on the left, but I can perfectly understand and respect the fact that my conservative friends genuinely believe that their preferred form of government/economy is the one that is more likely to lead to greater overall happiness in the utilitarian sense. And likewise, my conservative friends tend to understand that I think my preferred form of government/economy is that which is most likely to lead to optimal outcomes and the greatest overall happiness.

    I love catching up with my conservative friends for an in-depth conversation about politics, about the economy and current affairs, and sharing our respective views. We find we often have far more in common than the political labels to which we adhere would suggest.

    Part of the problem with modern politics, tribal as it is, is that people on both the left and the right tend to get swept up in this aggressive, nasty, zero-sum mindset that views political opponents as enemies, and not just enemies but idiots. And in fact not just idiots but people with ill intent.

    I've found that more mature adults with an interest in politics are able to put their politics to one side in a social sense, and have friends on both sides of the spectrum, and are able to empathise with and understand why the other side thinks the way they do, while still believing their own side has the best answers to the problems we face. Believing in the inherent evilness of your political opponents means you are unlikely to make friends with such people, which itself means you will not be exposed to differing points of view. By taking such a view, someone instantly reduces the potential scope of their social circle, and closes themselves off into a political echo chamber.
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    (Original post by MatthewParis)
    As a companion thread to the "Are socialists psychopaths?".

    And the answer is; of course not (though there is research that suggests wealth can reduce compassion). But fundamentally, the ideology of conservatism itself is not psychopathic, nor is socialism.

    The suggestion that socialists (or indeed conservatives) are psychopaths suggests vaguely sociopathic tendencies in and of itself, in that it appears unable to empathise with and understand why people on the left might hold the views they do.

    I'm on the left, but I can perfectly understand and respect the fact that my conservative friends genuinely believe that their preferred form of government/economy is the one that is more likely to lead to greater overall happiness in the utilitarian sense. And likewise, my conservative friends tend to understand that I think my preferred form of government/economy is that which is most likely to lead to optimal outcomes and the greatest overall happiness.

    I love catching up with my conservative friends for an in-depth conversation about politics, about the economy and current affairs, and sharing our respective views. We find we often have far more in common than the political labels to which we adhere would suggest.

    Part of the problem with modern politics, tribal as it is, is that people on both the left and the right tend to get swept up in this aggressive, nasty, zero-sum mindset that views political opponents as enemies, and not just enemies but idiots. And in fact not just idiots but people with ill intent.

    I've found that more mature adults with an interest in politics are able to put their politics to one side in a social sense, and have friends on both sides of the spectrum, and are able to empathise with and understand why the other side thinks the way they do, while still believing their own side has the best answers to the problems we face.
    I am a very passionate conservative and do believe that the conservatives appeal to both the working, middle and upper classes. If we look at some of the legislations in the manifesto of Labour we can see that they make promises which may only benefit some of the working class. For example, the rise in minimum wage to £8. I own my own business and would only keep skilled workers of extreme value if this became legislation which would half my overall work force to just ensure I make a good turn over.

    Like most political groups they do not consider how by promising and bringing in legislations can affect all of their supporters, but rather just use propaganda to attract votes to place them in power.

    By raising the wage you would also be raising unemployment meaning that some workers wouldn't be able to get a job. Conservative although may be viewed as not being in support of working class by others but in my opinion they would be better in power than labour.

    -R :cool:
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    (Original post by Ribenas)
    By raising the wage you would also be raising unemployment
    -R :cool:
    The same argument was made before the introduction of the minimum wage; dire predictions were made of mass unemployment. In fact, the demand for labour is far less elastic and far less price sensitive than such theories and predictions allow

    In any case, everything you are saying there, about minimum wage, are things that Labour does take into account when making such a policy. It's just that they've come to a different conclusion to you about where to draw the line and about what policy objectives and economic/demographic interests take priority

    So... the thread was less about the specifics of policy (in fact, I deliberately avoided mentioning policy because it is entirely beside the point I was making) as it was about tribalism, about being open-minded and not ascribing an almost conspiratorial intent to your political opponents. I think that is damaging to our body politic.
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    One of my very closest friends voted Conservative. It was a shock but not a surprise. Still love them to bits, they're definitely not psychopathic.

    I think the OP's post is very good.
    I tend to associate 'leftyness' with a lot more compassion, a sense of wider responsibility for those less fortunate. Plus a recognition that being taxed is not the end of the world, especially if that money goes to help feed someone - clothe a small child, pay for the NHS etc the bleeding obvious.

    I could go on. But I've made these arguments before, and I'm getting tired of the ignorance intelligent debates such as these attract.
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    Hi Matthew Paris, how's king John doing?

    In all seriousness now, of course not. Political views don't influence and control your psychological make-up.
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    (Original post by dyslexicvegie)
    One of my very closest friends voted Conservative. It was a shock but not a surprise. Still love them to bits, they're definitely not psychopathic.

    I think the OP's post is very good.
    I tend to associate 'leftyness' with a lot more compassion, a sense of wider responsibility for those less fortunate. Plus a recognition that being taxed is not the end of the world, especially if that money goes to help feed someone - cloth a small child, pay for the NHS etc the bleeding obvious.

    I could go on. But I've made these arguments before, and I'm getting tired of the ignorance intelligent debates such as these attract.
    You make an extremely good argument I believe peoples issue with taxation is they don't have the choice of what their money is put towards. Although, this wouldn't achievable of course because some of the free services available wouldn't be able to function due to a lack of support.

    I particularly wouldn't want my own workings and direct taxation to go to benefit fraud. However, I would like to make it clear that I would feel proud to give it to the less fortune in which some benefits go to.

    -R
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    (Original post by dyslexicvegie)
    One of my very closest friends voted Conservative. It was a shock but not a surprise. Still love them to bits, they're definitely not psychopathic.

    I think the OP's post is very good.
    I tend to associate 'leftyness' with a lot more compassion, a sense of wider responsibility for those less fortunate. Plus a recognition that being taxed is not the end of the world, especially if that money goes to help feed someone - clothe a small child, pay for the NHS etc the bleeding obvious.
    Thanks. And completely agree with all you have said here
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    (Original post by EdmundWoodstock)
    Hi Matthew Paris, how's king John doing?
    Dead, unfortunately. King Henry III is now my lord and master

    In all seriousness now, of course not. Political views don't influence and control your psychological make-up.
    Agreed, 100%
 
 
 
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