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FP1 edexcel specification query Watch

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    Are these sorts of questions on the specification for the FP1 UK EDEXCEL spec? And how would I go about answering them?
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
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    You have to split up the summation.

    \displaystyle\sum_{r=1}^n (9r^2 - 4r) = 9\sum_{r=1}^n r^2 - 4 \sum_{r=1}^n r
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    (Original post by lizard54142)
    You have to split up the summation.

    \displaystyle\sum_{r=1}^n (9r^2 - 4r) = 9\sum_{r=1}^n r^2 - 4 \sum_{r=1}^n r
    That part is fine, thanks
    It's just the second part, and the second image too


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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    Are these sorts of questions on the specification for the FP1 UK EDEXCEL spec? And how would I go about answering them?
    The second part of the first image involves the use of the summation of a geometric series - C2 knowledge. For FP1, all C1/2 knowledge is expected and can be tested.

    For the next one, you have to apply your understand of summations and the standard formulae. You know that the summation for the standard formulae goes from r=1 to n, so use those formulae and then add on the 0th term.


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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    The second part of the first image involves the use of the summation of a geometric series - C2 knowledge. For FP1, all C1/2 knowledge is expected and can be tested.

    For the next one, you have to apply your understand of summations and the standard formulae. You know that the summation for the standard formulae goes from r=1 to n, so use those formulae and then add on the 0th term.


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    Could you potentially run through the second one please? It's confusing me a little
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    That part is fine, thanks
    It's just the second part, and the second image too


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    Using the result from part a, and you also have to evaluate:

    \displaystyle k\sum_{r=1}^{12} 2^r

    Do you know how to do this?
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    (Original post by lizard54142)
    Using the result from part a, and you also have to evaluate:

    \displaystyle k\sum_{r=1}^{12} 2^r

    Do you know how to do this?
    Nope
    I know how geometric sequences work...well....it's been a long time!
    I've just never seen it on a standard FP1 paper so was thrown
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    Nope
    I know how geometric sequences work...well....it's been a long time!
    I've just never seen it on a standard FP1 paper so was thrown
    You have to be prepared, because C1/C2 is assumed knowledge! Are you okay with the question now?
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    (Original post by lizard54142)
    You have to be prepared, because C1/C2 is assumed knowledge! Are you okay with the question now?
    Would it be possible for you to run through it?
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    Are these sorts of questions on the specification for the FP1 UK EDEXCEL spec? And how would I go about answering them?
    I answered the second thumbnail for you.

    Attachment 395975 This be the answer

    The other one it seems others are trying to answer it so I will let them continue.
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    Would it be possible for you to run through it?
    Sure. A geometric sequence is a sequence of numbers where the ratio between successive terms is a constant.

    i.e.

    \frac{u_{n+1}}{u_n} = \frac{u_{n+2}}{u_{n+1}}

    The summation of "n" terms is:

    S_n = \frac{a(1 - r^n)}{1 - r}

    Where a is the first term, and r is the ratio between terms. So what is the first term in your geometric sequence, and what is the ratio? Writing out the first few terms may help.
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    (Original post by Jai Sandhu)
    I answered the second thumbnail for you.

    Attachment 395975 This be the answer

    The other one it seems others are trying to answer it so I will let them continue.
    So times (2n+1) by (n+1) and this switches the summations to standard?
    Unless I'm completely missing something... Which is likely!
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    (Original post by lizard54142)
    Sure. A geometric sequence is a sequence of numbers where the ratio between successive terms is a constant.

    i.e.

    \frac{u_{n+1}}{u_n} = \frac{u_{n+2}}{u_{n+1}}

    The summation of "n" terms is:

    S_n = \frac{a(1 - r^n)}{1 - r}

    Where a is the first term, and r is the ratio between terms. So what is the first term in your geometric sequence, and what is the ratio? Writing out the first few terms may help.
    Sorted it
    Thank you
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    So times (2n+1) by (n+1) and this switches the summations to standard?
    Unless I'm completely missing something... Which is likely!
    Yes, it gives you terms in n as n is a constant, are you clear as to why we have n+1 though?
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    Sorted it
    Thank you
    No problem The trick with the second question (which Jai answered) is to notice that it is from r = 0 to n, whereas the standard results are given from r = 1.

    (Original post by Jai Sandhu)
    Yes, it gives you terms in n as n is a constant, are you clear as to why we have n+1 though?
    I am very jealous of your Sigma's, mine are disgusting.
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    (Original post by lizard54142)
    I am very jealous of your Sigma's, mine are disgusting.
    That and other mathematical signs are the limits to my artistic flair but thank you
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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    Are these sorts of questions on the specification for the FP1 UK EDEXCEL spec? And how would I go about answering them?
    what paper is the first image from?
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    (Original post by Jai Sandhu)
    That and other mathematical signs are the limits to my artistic flair but thank you
    I can write a beastly lambda, but that's about it. It's especially embarrassing trying to write out \mathbb{N}, \mathbb{Z} etc. I bet yours look amazing.
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    (Original post by lizard54142)
    I can write a beastly lambda, but that's about it. It's especially embarrassing trying to write out \mathbb{N}, \mathbb{Z} etc. I bet yours look amazing.
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1431384933.076263.jpg
Views: 253
Size:  110.7 KB

    You can be the judge of that!


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