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Why did ex LibDems turn to tory? Watch

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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    I think Paxman put it best after the exit poll.. 'if this exit poll is right then it looks like the Tories have basically eaten their coalition partners whole'.

    At least Clegg survived, the electorate thankfully rewarded his period in office with another 5 years as MP.
    LOL
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    (Original post by cBay)
    If the Lib Dems collapsed because they dropped most of their more left leaning policies to prop up a tory government, why did most Lib Dems voters flock to the conservatives? I'm seriously stuggling to understand wtf happened.
    I don't see the evidence that that actually happened. The Lib Dem vote dropped by 15% whereas the Tory vote went up by 1%.
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    Just to put this into context. I voted Lib Dem at the last election. Never again. They let the spivs in after spending two terms pretending to be to the left of Labour. It shows the pitfalls of tactical voting.
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    (Original post by metropol)
    Just to put this into context. I voted Lib Dem at the last election. Never again. They let the spivs in after spending two terms pretending to be to the left of Labour. It shows the pitfalls of tactical voting.
    You'd have preferred a second election and probably Tory majority?
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    You'd have preferred a second election and probably Tory majority?
    Don't think that was an option tbh. I would have preferred the Tories to go in as the largest party.
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    (Original post by metropol)
    Don't think that was an option tbh. I would have preferred the Tories to go in as the largest party.
    In 2010 it would certainly have been. Cameron would have gone to the country and said ' we offered the liberals x and y, lots of reasonable things.. they rejected us and this is why you need strong majority governments..'.

    Faced with Labour who had just been kicked out and a Lib party who had just rejected their one chance at power, Cameron would have got a majority.

    ..

    The Lib Dems only ever had 1 option if they wanted to do anything.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    In 2010 it would certainly have been. Cameron would have gone to the country and said ' we offered the liberals x and y, lots of reasonable things.. they rejected us and this is why you need strong majority governments..'.

    Faced with Labour who had just been kicked out and a Lib party who had just rejected their one chance at power, Cameron would have got a majority.

    ..

    The Lib Dems only ever had 1 option if they wanted to do anything.
    I don't think it's true that the Liberal Democrats would've rejected there "one chance at power". As I recall there was a surge of support for Nick Clegg after the debates, and that would've only grown because it's much easier to remain likeable in opposition than in power. It's quite plausible that if there was another election that the Liberal Democrats would have increased their voting share, and upon the exit of Gordon Brown, Labour would have increased theirs.

    What has truly destroyed the Lib Dem's is the tuition fees debacle. What they failed to realise is that their promise was widely known, and that by reneging on it they were affecting a whole generation of young people about to go to university, a lot of whom now resent being forced to pay much higher fees than their predecessors. It will be very difficult for them to win that generation back.
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    (Original post by ThatPerson)
    I don't think it's true that the Liberal Democrats would've rejected there "one chance at power". As I recall there was a surge of support for Nick Clegg after the debates, and that would've only grown because it's much easier to remain likeable in opposition than in power. It's quite plausible that if there was another election that the Liberal Democrats would have increased their voting share, and upon the exit of Gordon Brown, Labour would have increased theirs.

    What has truly destroyed the Lib Dem's is the tuition fees debacle. What they failed to realise is that their promise was widely known, and that by reneging on it they were affecting a whole generation of young people about to go to university, a lot of whom now resent being forced to pay much higher fees than their predecessors. It will be very difficult for them to win that generation back.
    While Clegg became extremely popular, his party gained little when polling was averaged. A bit like how the last budget saw a jump in Osbourne's ratings, but no polling changes (even the ones showing Tory leads). At any rate, in the north of the country that would have hurt Labour even more. A leaderless Labour would have probably done worse... as such, i maintain that Cameron would have secured a majority from a second election in 2010.

    I agree in that it was symbolic and that the strategy in coalition was poor after the first 3 years (afterward it looked like a Tory majority and Clegg stupidly started telling people how nasty his coalition partners were allowing the Tories to claim all the credit for the good). The Lib Dem PR machine is also crap and should be sacked.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    In 2010 it would certainly have been. Cameron would have gone to the country and said ' we offered the liberals x and y, lots of reasonable things.. they rejected us and this is why you need strong majority governments..'.

    Faced with Labour who had just been kicked out and a Lib party who had just rejected their one chance at power, Cameron would have got a majority.

    ..

    The Lib Dems only ever had 1 option if they wanted to do anything.

    I don't think anyone is denying the Lib Dems had to prop up Cameron but full coalition may have been the fatal error.


    A more informal arrangement would have probably been better.
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    (Original post by orange crush)
    I don't think anyone is denying the Lib Dems had to prop up Cameron but full coalition may have been the fatal error.

    A more informal arrangement would have probably been better.
    That's probably true in hindsight although without the Fixed terms act that would have left them vulnerable to the Tories jumping the gun when polling looked good. Of course, keeping a lot of support may have been a reasonable price for that.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    That's probably true in hindsight although without the Fixed terms act that would have left them vulnerable to the Tories jumping the gun when polling looked good. Of course, keeping a lot of support may have been a reasonable price for that.
    I don't know how familiar many posters are here with the Scottish government but when we had a hung parliament in 2007 the SNP didn't form a coalition but just gained consensus support on a case-by-case basis with (mainly) the Tories but also the Lib Dems.


    Worked pretty well.
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    The Liberal Democrats don't just have one base:

    1. People who turned to the Tories - they don't see the point in voting for LD if they get Tory anyway, they may have been the more conservative side of LD voters;
    2. People who turned to Labour - they may have been the lefter side of LD voters, they don't see the point voting for LD if they get Tory in the end;
    3. People who turned to UKIP/Greens/SNP - LD was the protest party of the last election, so after they've become the establishment the protest votes went to these three parties.

    Keep in mind they still have a significant number of votes, and they are only losing that many seats due to the first-past-the-post system, so a portion of voters turning to the Tories could make all the difference.

    If you look in greater details, you can probably try looking into whether LD tends to compete against the Tories or the Labour. It'd make a lot of sense if it's the former.
 
 
 
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