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    I'm worried, I may be overcomplicating my answers. Normally when I write an answer, I worry that I've misphrased a sentence, and I have to further explain a point, and it takes far too long for me to get to the point. Yet when I look at exemplar answers, they have a finely tuned structure, get to the point early on and though they tend to have less writing than me and get directly to the point.

    But I worry that if I get directly to the point, then I will miss out on marks by not having a detailed answer. Can anyone give me some advice for this?
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    Plan your answers. On a piece of scrap, write bullet points for the things you want to say and then construct your answer around the plan. Practice makes perfect!

    Good luck!
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    Are these long essay-style answers? If so, it's best practice to get to the point straight away by stating your argument, and the evidence you will analyse to support it, in your introduction paragraph.

    There's that common refrain, something like, 'tell them what you're going to tell them (introduction paragraph), tell them (analysis of evidence/case studies), then tell them what you've told them (conclusion)'

    Doing this in your answers sets up a clear structure from the beginning, making it obvious to the marker and easier for them to follow.

    As a general rule, always think simplicity with answers - you need to be able to explain even complex ideas succinctly and simply.
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    (Original post by Antifazian)
    Are these long essay-style answers? If so, it's best practice to get to the point straight away by stating your argument, and the evidence you will analyse to support it, in your introduction paragraph.

    There's that common refrain, something like, 'tell them what you're going to tell them (introduction paragraph), tell them (analysis of evidence/case studies), then tell them what you've told them (conclusion)'

    Doing this in your answers sets up a clear structure from the beginning, making it obvious to the marker and easier for them to follow.

    As a general rule, always think simplicity with answers - you need to be able to explain even complex ideas succinctly and simply.
    what are the likely topics
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    (Original post by Antifazian)
    Are these long essay-style answers? If so, it's best practice to get to the point straight away by stating your argument, and the evidence you will analyse to support it, in your introduction paragraph.

    There's that common refrain, something like, 'tell them what you're going to tell them (introduction paragraph), tell them (analysis of evidence/case studies), then tell them what you've told them (conclusion)'

    Doing this in your answers sets up a clear structure from the beginning, making it obvious to the marker and easier for them to follow.

    As a general rule, always think simplicity with answers - you need to be able to explain even complex ideas succinctly and simply.
    Dont tell em dont tell em you dont even dont tell em you dont even you dont even gotta tell em
    LOL sorry...I couldnt stop myself
 
 
 
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