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    Hey everyone!

    Hope you're all well.

    Basically, was just wondering whether anyone had any experience of doing a PGCE as an F1 and F2. I'm quite interested in pursuing medical education and so thought getting a PGCE, and the experience/exposure that comes with it, would quite beneficial in the long-run. However, I am a bit unsure as to whether it is manageable during the F1/F2 years. Has anyone done a PGCE during their F1/F2 years and if so, any advice on getting the most of it/balancing it with your clinical commitments.
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    (Original post by counterstrike91)
    Hey everyone!

    Hope you're all well.

    Basically, was just wondering whether anyone had any experience of doing a PGCE as an F1 and F2. I'm quite interested in pursuing medical education and so thought getting a PGCE, and the experience/exposure that comes with it, would quite beneficial in the long-run. However, I am a bit unsure as to whether it is manageable during the F1/F2 years. Has anyone done a PGCE during their F1/F2 years and if so, any advice on getting the most of it/balancing it with your clinical commitments.
    I'm honestly not sure what the point would be even if it were manageable timewise - if you want to pursue MedEd then presumably you'd like to look into teaching at undergrad/postgrad level, so I'm not sure how learning how to teach secondary school pupils will help you at all. There appears to be such a thing as a PGCHE (= Higher Education), but wouldn't you want to be doing a Masters or similar in MedEd if that's what you're looking to pursue? A PGCHE would appear utterly redundant if you were planning on studying MedEd formally anyway.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    I'm honestly not sure what the point would be even if it were manageable timewise - if you want to pursue MedEd then presumably you'd like to look into teaching at undergrad/postgrad level, so I'm not sure how learning how to teach secondary school pupils will help you at all. There appears to be such a thing as a PGCHE (= Higher Education), but wouldn't you want to be doing a Masters or similar in MedEd if that's what you're looking to pursue? A PGCHE would appear utterly redundant if you were planning on studying MedEd formally anyway.
    Think I may have confused you in the original post. When I say a PGCE, I'm specifically talking about a PGCE/PGCert relating to MedEd (e.g. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/ma...education-msc/ http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advic...0.7490.s99.xml).
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    I think you confused everyone! I've never seen 'PGCE' used in a medical context - that article just used it for clickbait.

    I think one or two people on here have done it. From what I've read consensus is that it's perfectly doable, but is actually a considerable time commitment (and deadlines can be a pain in the gluteus maximus - as with any course, except you're working now).

    Do consider cost, and also whether you want a few contact days or completely distance learning
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    You don't need any additional qualifications to go into medical education, just the desire, so my lazy self says, why bother? It's time and money and you could use the equivalent time trying to get your royal college exams sorted, which will be much more immediately valuable. But that's just me
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    (Original post by seaholme)
    You don't need any additional qualifications to go into medical education, just the desire, so my lazy self says, why bother? It's time and money and you could use the equivalent time trying to get your royal college exams sorted, which will be much more immediately valuable. But that's just me
    It is currently desirable to have a formal teaching qualification in most consultant contracts associated with medical schools. Teaching under the direct employment of a medical school probably requires a formal teaching qualification, and I suspect that this will become an essential requirement in certain consultant contracts soon.




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    I agree with carcinoma, teaching qualifications are becoming more desirable, not so much for juniors (you often don't get points specifically for a teaching qualification in CT/ST1 applications, although I believe you do for some specialities, e.g. paediatrics), but as you become more senior it is of more value, and more and more people are doing them.

    I am doing a distance learning PGCE/PGCert in Medical Education at the moment and I am an F1. I have done 5/6ths of the course and am working on the assignment for the final 1/6th at the moment. I would thoroughly recommend it if you are interested in medical education. I chose to do it because I generally enjoy studying and thought medical education would be the most interesting/valuable thing I could do at the moment. I don't know what I want to specialise in so I haven't really considered doing membership exams and didn't want to start a masters in something speciality specific. It is quite a lot of work but I've found it very interesting and it is very different from medicine. It's made me think differently and much more deeply than you generally do at work as an F1, so its actually quite a nice break. I also think it has made me a better teacher, which I guess is the important part. I would only recommend doing it if it is something you want to do for enjoyment though, it is time consuming and there are more effective/quicker/cheaper ways of improving your CV than this. I have the option of carrying on to do a Postgrad Diploma and then a Masters, which I am seriously considering as I have enjoyed it so much.
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    Also to note that some teaching fellow jobs will fund your postgraduate certificate/diploma if that's (seriously) your thing!
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    I'm doing it now. It does gets you speciality application points, and its easily manageable even alongside postgrad exams.

    It is very expensive though.
 
 
 
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