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    Anyone else got any ideas about the 6 markers?
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    (Original post by aksh282)
    Anyone else got any ideas about the 6 markers?
    Acid rain, Fractional Distillation, and ways of getting salt? (Rock mining, solution mining, evaporation)
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    I'm glad the biology exam is over now. I've got my second RE exam tomorrow, so focusing more on that at the moment. I managed to get 55/60 on my chemistry mock (C4,5,6). The 1,2,3 exams are easy compared to later modules so hopefully the chemistry will be fine.
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    My problem with 1 2 3 is the questions sometimes are too simple and I miss the basic science and instead explain the stuff I've done in 4 5 6 and end up with a few less marks because of it.
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    (Original post by jordancbuckley9)
    My problem with 1 2 3 is the questions sometimes are too simple and I miss the basic science and instead explain the stuff I've done in 4 5 6 and end up with a few less marks because of it.
    omg totally get what you mean!
    I find most of the 123 modules have too much ethics and the 'how science works' part of the specification rather than actual science content, which is why i do much better with the 456 and 7 modules!
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    I do better with the 123 modules haha such a loser here!
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    (Original post by abbeyjayne)
    I do better with the 123 modules haha such a loser here!
    Nothing bad about it, in fact I end up doing worse on the 123's than the rest of the units
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    Do we need to know the products made from exact hydrocarbon chain lengths (pg 21 in revision guide)?
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    (Original post by panda64)
    Do we need to know the products made from exact hydrocarbon chain lengths (pg 21 in revision guide)?
    I guess it's worth learning, shouldn't be too tricky to remember them and it may come up in the paper though it's unlikely.
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    (Original post by Vanilla Poison)
    Nothing bad about it, in fact I end up doing worse on the 123's than the rest of the units
    True. Well, I guess for Chemistry I'm better at 456 because I fully understand the ions and all that. Biology, better at B123 and physics, wouldn't say I'm good at anything but if I had to pick P7 (cause I literally understand that to a tee).
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    Hi,

    Would this be a correct explanation for the separation of crude oil?

    Crude oil is a mixture of hydrocarbons. Crude oil has to be refined in order for it to be useful. Crude oil enters the fractional distillation column where molecules are separated into different fractions based on the size of their molecules and boiling point. The temperature is higher at the bottom and lower at the top. The hydrocarbons such as bitumen and lubricating oil have a high boiling point due to having large molecules (in terms of size), this means that the intermolecular forces of attraction are stronger so more energy is need to overcome the forces in order to separate the hydrocarbon chains, thereby giving them a higher boiling point. On the other hand the molecules that have lower boiling points have smaller sized molecules, so their intermolecular force of attraction are weaker and so less energy is needed to break the intermolecular forces to cause the hydrocarbon chains to uncoil and slide past each other.
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    (Original post by zigocarn)
    Hi,

    Would this be a correct explanation for the separation of crude oil?

    Crude oil is a mixture of hydrocarbons. Crude oil has to be refined in order for it to be useful. Crude oil enters the fractional distillation column where molecules are separated into different fractions based on the size of their molecules and boiling point. The temperature is higher at the bottom and lower at the top. The hydrocarbons such as bitumen and lubricating oil have a high boiling point due to having large molecules (in terms of size), this means that the intermolecular forces of attraction are stronger so more energy is need to overcome the forces in order to separate the hydrocarbon chains, thereby giving them a higher boiling point. On the other hand the molecules that have lower boiling points have smaller sized molecules, so their intermolecular force of attraction are weaker and so less energy is needed to break the intermolecular forces to cause the hydrocarbon chains to uncoil and slide past each other.

    yeah sounds alright to me, however I'm the worst at fractional distillation haha
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    (Original post by zigocarn)
    Hi,

    Would this be a correct explanation for the separation of crude oil?

    Crude oil is a mixture of hydrocarbons. Crude oil has to be refined in order for it to be useful. Crude oil enters the fractional distillation column where molecules are separated into different fractions based on the size of their molecules and boiling point. The temperature is higher at the bottom and lower at the top. The hydrocarbons such as bitumen and lubricating oil have a high boiling point due to having large molecules (in terms of size), this means that the intermolecular forces of attraction are stronger so more energy is need to overcome the forces in order to separate the hydrocarbon chains, thereby giving them a higher boiling point. On the other hand the molecules that have lower boiling points have smaller sized molecules, so their intermolecular force of attraction are weaker and so less energy is needed to break the intermolecular forces to cause the hydrocarbon chains to uncoil and slide past each other.
    Yeah could mention the covalent bonds how they don't break




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    Just wondering, how many of you guys are on study leave?
    Our school makes us have to come
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    We have to go to school until the 8th, then we come in only for our exams and lessons of those exams.

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    (Original post by ShortStuff8)
    We have to go to school until the 8th, then we come in only for our exams and lessons of those exams.

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    I'd take that over our system any day! We've got to come in (full 6-7 hours) till our last exam which for me is the 22nd of June I believe :O
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    Maybe catalytic converter
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    (Original post by Vanilla Poison)
    Just wondering, how many of you guys are on study leave?
    Our school makes us have to come
    My school is running booster sessions up until half term. Most people are allowed to choose if they come in or not. After half term, I think we just have to come in for exams.
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    (Original post by zigocarn)
    Hi,

    Would this be a correct explanation for the separation of crude oil?

    Crude oil is a mixture of hydrocarbons. Crude oil has to be refined in order for it to be useful. Crude oil enters the fractional distillation column where molecules are separated into different fractions based on the size of their molecules and boiling point. The temperature is higher at the bottom and lower at the top. The hydrocarbons such as bitumen and lubricating oil have a high boiling point due to having large molecules (in terms of size), this means that the intermolecular forces of attraction are stronger so more energy is need to overcome the forces in order to separate the hydrocarbon chains, thereby giving them a higher boiling point. On the other hand the molecules that have lower boiling points have smaller sized molecules, so their intermolecular force of attraction are weaker and so less energy is needed to break the intermolecular forces to cause the hydrocarbon chains to uncoil and slide past each other.
    Thats a great answer!
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    (Original post by horsewithnoname)
    My school is running booster sessions up until half term. Most people are allowed to choose if they come in or not. After half term, I think we just have to come in for exams.
    Our school has additional booster sessions on top of our normal lessons, so a school day will usually end at 5:00pm. We also have to come in during the half term holidays, I don't even know what the school is thinking...
 
 
 
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