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Prince Charles letter-does he come off well or badly? watch

  • View Poll Results: How has Prince Charles come across from his letters
    He has come across well
    21
    80.77%
    He has come across badly
    5
    19.23%

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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-32716450

    The 27 "black spider memos", so called because of Prince Charles's handwriting, will be released after a decade-long campaign by The Guardian.
    The government's veto on publication was declared unlawful by the Court of Appeal last year - a decision which was upheld by the Supreme Court in March.
    The letters, written in 2004 and 2005, will be published with redactions.
    Their publication follows a ruling on Tuesday by the Upper Tribunal of Britain's Administrative Appeals Chamber.
    It said the material could be published subject to any "provisional redactions" to protect personal data of people other than the prince.
    The letters, which cover the period between September 2004 and April 2005, reflect - according to former attorney general Dominic Grieve - Prince Charles's "most deeply held personal views and beliefs".
    During a visit to a Prince's Trust charitable project in London, the prince was asked by a reporter if he was "worried" about the release of the documents.
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    Now we get to find out how accurate the Charles-inspired social justice king on the second series of House of Cards (UK) was.
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    Available here. Looks like a bunch of nothing out of the ordinary to me...
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    So the Princes Charles black spider letters have been released after a 10 year battle and they have attracted much media attention. He discusses a range of subject matter, clearly the Guardian being anti Monarchist wanted him to come off badly but has he come off badly or has he come of well?

    Personally I think he has come off well as an intelligent and passionate future king who clearly cares about issues, people and the country
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    I think he comes off well. All the warnings of revelations of a meddling Prince throwing policies and making demands at our elected government seem to be all hot air. The most he appears to have done is make broad comments on an issue and drawn the Government's attention to reports or developments, and seems quite apologetic for even that!
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    I think those who dislike him will see in these letters what they want to see.

    From my perspective, he comes across well enough. He's hardly bossing anyone around, he's just raising issues.
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    For me, it doesn't matter what impression he gives. The bottom line is that he shouldn't be attempting to influence policy in any way whatsoever, and if he attempts to do so, then he shouldn't have any issue with his correspondence being released under the Freedom of Information Act.

    Additionally, I'm slightly unsettled by the possibility that David Cameron may seek to increase ministerial veto powers.
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    (Original post by ThatPerson)
    For me, it doesn't matter what impression he gives. The bottom line is that he shouldn't be attempting to influence policy in any way whatsoever, and if he attempts to do so, then he shouldn't have any issue with his correspondence being released under the Freedom of Information Act.
    Do you have objections to anyone attempting to influence policy who is not an elected Member of Parliament or do you consider the Prince of Wales a special case?
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    (Original post by gladders)
    Do you have objections to anyone attempting to influence policy who is not an elected Member of Parliament or do you consider the Prince of Wales a special case?
    Do you consider the Prince of Walves to have the same amount of influence as an ordinary citizen?


    Pretending he is simply an ordinary citizen writing a letter to an PM is very hackish. Especially when your argument appears to be "Well do you have a problem when anyone else does it!!?"
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    You could say he is a royal pain in the ass
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    (Original post by gladders)
    Do you have objections to anyone attempting to influence policy who is not an elected Member of Parliament or do you consider the Prince of Wales a special case?
    I consider him a special case because of the influence he wields as a royal and the place the monarchy has in our society.
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    (Original post by Mark8346)
    Do you consider the Prince of Walves to have the same amount of influence as an ordinary citizen?

    Pretending he is simply an ordinary citizen writing a letter to an PM is very hackish. Especially when your argument appears to be "Well do you have a problem when anyone else does it!!?"
    That's not what I was arguing, and it's a shame you jumped to such a conclusion.

    For the record, I feel he has different influence in one way, but it balances out in others. Anybody can write to a Minister and make plain their views, but it is true that letters from the Prince of Wales are more likely to be read. However, all letters have to be read and replied to.

    Unlike the rest of us, the Prince cannot vote, cannot speak out in public, and cannot direct resources or activity to promote or oppose a policy. So I have no problem with him writing letters.

    If you look at the letters, the wording, the subjects, and the way in which he conveys his point is all pretty unremarkable. He's not telling the government to do one thing or another, and is rather imploring them to keep a particular matter in mind, on the whole.
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    I remain a great fan of the Prince of Wales.
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    He comes across like a harmless kook. I think the British public will be charmed by his self-deprecatory tone. If only more of our public figures were so humble.

    Still, really he should not have been writing to influence policy. It is his constitutional duty not to. If he couldn't help himself , he should at least have done so in the guise of an average citizen, a la Henry V, rather than identifying himself through titles and styles or Clarence House notepaper.
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    (Original post by Mark8346)
    Especially when your argument appears to be "Well do you have a problem when anyone else does it!!?"
    (Original post by gladders)
    That's not what I was arguing, and it's a shame you jumped to such a conclusion.
    (Original post by gladders)
    Anybody can write to a Minister and make plain their views
    Isn't it a bit strange to claim that is not what you were arguing, and then argue it in the next sentence?
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    (Original post by Mark8346)
    Isn't it a bit strange to claim that is not what you were arguing, and then argue it in the next sentence?
    Sure, if you're an idiot and stop at the end of those words.
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    Astounding to read how much of an influence the heir to the throne had, and to some extent maybe still has, over ministers, government officials, and ultimately, particular pushing and altering of legislation. We usually don't hear from the Royal's in a political sense, so this is interesting.

    Charles Clarke calling himself 'an obedient servant' to Charles was a personal highlight.
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    The other words were you attempting to justify your point of view - such as him not having the vote. The justification is irrelevant. You were arguing what I claimed you were, while pretending you were not.
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    (Original post by RyWalker)
    Astounding to read how much of an influence the heir to the throne had, and to some extent maybe still has, over ministers, government officials, and ultimately, particular pushing and altering of legislation. We usually don't hear from the Royal's in a political sense, so this is interesting.

    Charles Clarke calling himself 'an obedient servant' to Charles was a personal highlight.
    You mean Charles Clarke signing off a letter as per any letter sent to royalty.
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    (Original post by RyWalker)
    Astounding to read how much of an influence the heir to the throne had, and to some extent maybe still has, over ministers, government officials, and ultimately, particular pushing and altering of legislation. We usually don't hear from the Royal's in a political sense, so this is interesting.
    Did you actually read them? Can you give examples of anything in this that he actually got the government to do (especially anything that the government was reluctant to do)?

    Charles Clarke calling himself 'an obedient servant' to Charles was a personal highlight.
    A perfectly ordinary and polite means of signing off a letter.
 
 
 

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