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    I'm in year 11 currently, and I'm currently deciding whether to pursue Computer Science or Economics for A Level, since both are offered at my school's sixth form.

    I've read a lot about strengthening an application for Economics, further reading, going to LSE events and summer schools; but I can't find much for strengthening a computer science application.

    I understand that small projects etc. will be useful, and is what I'm going to do over the summer and have been doing for a while, but what can I do to make my application stand out when I apply? Are there any preliminary reading lists that are useful? Or anything that just makes sure the university sees my interest in computer science.

    Thanks for any help!
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    Ask yourself why computer science interests you. Then elaborate further on the main reason. Computer Science is not just about programming, it deals with the theory and practice of computing in order to manage information and/or create software, which brings the hardware to life. It is about logic, problem-solving and coming up with elaborate solutions to solve issues, whatever those might be.

    Pick up basic coding, watch a variety of videos, which cover different areas of computer science. Essentially, Computer Science revolves around problem-solving. My advice would be to provide evidence of transferable skills in this direction. Simply doing things, which are a bit cliched (like reading "The Economist" if you want to study Economics) will make admissions staff yawn. Talk about YOUR motives and what makes you tick. Demonstrate that you have done your research about the subject and relate that knowledge to some of your other interests. For example, I have read a personal statement where the applicant talked about writing about a program in order to check his maths problem solutions.

    What message does that send to the admissions tutor? The applicant has transferable skills which go both ways. Not only does he/she do maths, but he/she uses those math-related skills to systematically break-down and manage information about a problem in a way that a computer can process it and present a solution. You don't have to do the same thing, but I think you get the idea. Relate computer science concepts to your personal interests and elaborate. I hope that helped.
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    I recommend taking a look at Harvard's CS50, it's their introductory Computer Science class and they have all of their lectures and class materials online. It covers all the basics from coding to C, algorithms, cryptography and so on.

    https://cs50.harvard.edu
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    (Original post by Broscientist)
    Demonstrate that you have done your research about the subject and relate that knowledge to some of your other interests. For example, I have read a personal statement where the applicant talked about writing about a program in order to check his maths problem solutions.

    What message does that send to the admissions tutor? The applicant has transferable skills which go both ways. Not only does he/she do maths, but he/she uses those math-related skills to systematically break-down and manage information about a problem in a way that a computer can process it and present a solution. You don't have to do the same thing, but I think you get the idea. Relate computer science concepts to your personal interests and elaborate. I hope that helped.
    Sorry if this sounds stupid, but, let's say you make some kind of a program, eg. a chess game vs. a computer. In your personal statement when you mention it, can you include a link to it/may they ask you for proof? Or is it something to "colour" your personal statement, and you are only asked about it at the interview, eg. what language you used, how long it took, what it kind of features it had, etc? Not that I'm wondering whether I can lie on my PS, but wouldn't saying that you made an application sound as cliche as saying that you read a certain book? I'm sure there are people who lied about this and got away.
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    (Original post by BlueWolf16)
    Sorry if this sounds stupid, but, let's say you make some kind of a program, eg. a chess game vs. a computer. In your personal statement when you mention it, can you include a link to it/may they ask you for proof? Or is it something to "colour" your personal statement, and you are only asked about it at the interview, eg. what language you used, how long it took, what it kind of features it had, etc? Not that I'm wondering whether I can lie on my PS, but wouldn't saying that you made an application sound as cliche as saying that you read a certain book? I'm sure there are people who lied about this and got away.
    Do not lie. Only talk about the things you have genuinely done. I am sure there are people who lie, but I do not think it is worth it trying to BS your way into university.

    Not to mention that people reading personal statements are quite experienced. I doubt it is too hard for them to pick up on lies.
 
 
 

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