Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    When I chose my A Level options a few months ago I picked
    Maths - enjoy it, good at it + think its useful
    FM - ditto
    Physics - find it really interesting + think I want to do some sort of physics / engineering at university
    German - have learnt most of AS grammar and content already
    History - find it really interesting

    A few weeks later I switched History for Chemistry, because I though Chemistry would open more doors and go well with Maths / Physics.

    I'm now starting to really doubt whether I want to do Chemistry - I find some of the stuff eg atomic structure + bonding quite interesting, the rest is pretty dull. In contrast, while History might not be that useful in terms of what I want to do in the future, the course looks really interesting, and I'd be sad not to do it, at least to AS. I'm not hugely enthusiastic about German, but my German teacher would be really disappointed if I didn't do it, and you can do some history + culture as part of it. As I have done most of the AS content already, it would be the easiest to get an A in.

    I need to pick two out of History, Chemistry and German. I was wondering if anyone had any opinions on any of those subjects at A Level (particularly Chemistry - how interesting do you find it?). What does anyone suggest I do?

    Sorry this is quite long, but thank you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Well, with German, you shouldn't choose it because you're teacher wants you to, but if you want to. Yeah you may be good at it, but it's whether you wan't to carry it on?

    And I'm pretty sure History is a really highly looked upon A-Level (don't take my word for it though) so I think that it may be a good choice, as I've heard that unis like to see that you can take a variety of different kind of subjects as it shows you're a complex student or something.

    But if you're looking to doing something science-related, maybe you should do chem, but it's whether you can push yourself to do the two years of it. I'm going through this choice right now, I don't fully enjoy chemistry but I feel like I need to do it so that I can easily get into a medical course in uni.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ifyouseelaura)
    When I chose my A Level options a few months ago I picked
    Maths - enjoy it, good at it + think its useful
    FM - ditto
    Physics - find it really interesting + think I want to do some sort of physics / engineering at university
    German - have learnt most of AS grammar and content already
    History - find it really interesting

    A few weeks later I switched History for Chemistry, because I though Chemistry would open more doors and go well with Maths / Physics.

    I'm now starting to really doubt whether I want to do Chemistry - I find some of the stuff eg atomic structure + bonding quite interesting, the rest is pretty dull. In contrast, while History might not be that useful in terms of what I want to do in the future, the course looks really interesting, and I'd be sad not to do it, at least to AS. I'm not hugely enthusiastic about German, but my German teacher would be really disappointed if I didn't do it, and you can do some history + culture as part of it. As I have done most of the AS content already, it would be the easiest to get an A in.

    I need to pick two out of History, Chemistry and German. I was wondering if anyone had any opinions on any of those subjects at A Level (particularly Chemistry - how interesting do you find it?). What does anyone suggest I do?

    Sorry this is quite long, but thank you
    I do history and ended up dropping chemistry just before easter as it was quite hard. there is a lot to learn in it but i fell down with the maths point. if you're good at maths i shouldn't be a problem but DON'T do something just because you are good at it. Pick subjects you enjoy. I now do History, Psychology and Biology and love them all (except bio, i tolerate that).
    hope this helps
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    i'm doing maths, physics, further maths and german! to me, german is a great break from the heavy mathematical content of the other subjects, and it is EXTREMELY rewarding. a language at AS level is invaluable and thoroughly enjoyable - plus it's a subject that fades away quite quickly if you leave it at an early age. i'm taking it next year, too! i would choose german but i'm obviously biased.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    i'm doing maths, physics, further maths and german! to me, german is a great break from the heavy mathematical content of the other subjects, and it is EXTREMELY rewarding. a language at AS level is invaluable and thoroughly enjoyable - plus it's a subject that fades away quite quickly if you leave it at an early age. i'm taking it next year, too! i would choose german but i'm obviously biased.
    That's reassuring - I was hoping German would provide some balance to my otherwise pretty science / maths heavy timetable... I too find it quite rewarding, particularly when I go to Germany and I can understand what people are saying, or when I watch German films. I don't think I'd have the motivation to continue studying German just in my spare time though. It's just I worry that I wouldn't enjoy German as much as I enjoy History, and it wouldn't be as useful as Chemistry. Though I suppose with German AS / A2 I could always do a science / engineering degree with a year in Germany...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pugglet)
    Pick subjects you enjoy.
    Hmm... that's kind of why I'm reconsidering History now - the course my school is doing is a new one that looks incredibly interesting (for AS. far less so for A2, but I suppose I'd be quite unlikely to want to continue History for 2 years as I'd have to sacrifice something else...) I don't want to do a year of Chemistry and hate it, knowing I could have done History and loved it.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ifyouseelaura)
    That's reassuring - I was hoping German would provide some balance to my otherwise pretty science / maths heavy timetable... I too find it quite rewarding, particularly when I go to Germany and I can understand what people are saying, or when I watch German films. I don't think I'd have the motivation to continue studying German just in my spare time though. It's just I worry that I wouldn't enjoy German as much as I enjoy History, and it wouldn't be as useful as Chemistry. Though I suppose with German AS / A2 I could always do a science / engineering degree with a year in Germany...
    I assure you that there is no such thing as a language at AS that is "not as useful"! Unless you want to do chemical engineering, chemistry is not at all necessary. I want to do mechanical engineering with a year in Europe and for engineering, maths and physics is enough (and further maths is a great bonus!) All my friends who take chemistry all seem to hate it and want to drop it as soon as possible because apparently it is a very demanding course compared to the other sciences, but if you are genuinely interested in it and want the challenge then there's no reason not to take it. As for history, there's really not much to say as I only did it to GCSE but if you feel that you won't enjoy German, I can't force you to take it
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Chemistry obviously makes sense to go eith the rest of your courses, but like somebody else said, it can be good to do a variety of subjects to broaden your chances. I do chemistry AS and it is quite hard but I do enjoy it, I know people that say physics is harder! I know that history is quite a hard A level but a good one to take if you're into history.

    Tbh I think you should choose the one that you would enjoy the most. And you're probably good at them all anyway!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    I assure you that there is no such thing as a language at AS that is "not as useful"! Unless you want to do chemical engineering, chemistry is not at all necessary. I want to do mechanical engineering with a year in Europe and for engineering, maths and physics is enough (and further maths is a great bonus!) All my friends who take chemistry all seem to hate it and want to drop it as soon as possible because apparently it is a very demanding course compared to the other sciences, but if you are genuinely interested in it and want the challenge then there's no reason not to take it. As for history, there's really not much to say as I only did it to GCSE but if you feel that you won't enjoy German, I can't force you to take it
    No, I really don't want to do chemical engineering, much more interested in electronics/physics/mechanics etc. That's I think why I'm really doubting Chemistry - yes its "useful" in the sense it compliments other sciences, but I'm not sure I will have a specific "use" for it in that nothing I can see myself doing at university require it.

    But then if I did Chemistry, enjoyed the challenge and began to like it, I wonder if the subjects that I could see myself doing at university might change...? That's my dilemma... But I'm not sure I can justify picking Chemistry over History just because Chemistry might become interesting and useful. History and German on the other hand - I know I like them, I'm good at them and they're respected subjects. If I don't pick Chemistry, I can't see myself this time next year regretting not doing Chemistry, but I might regret not doing the others. On the other hand, if I do pick Chemistry, it might lead on to things I'm not currently aware of... It's tricky.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I'm in a similar situation: maths, further maths, and physics, and then either French or chemistry. My thinking is that French would be more fun, but chemistry would give me more degree choices if I decide I don't like mathsy stuff as much as I think I do :/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Well I'm doing Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics and German with the intention of doing Chemical Engineering at University.
    What I can can say from experience, is that German (OCR) is an absolute Godsend in the middle of all the Maths and Science. Learning a Language is quite relaxing really (I was in a set of 7 people) and just helped me to get settled in A-levels. The exam isn't too challenging, I barely scraped an A* at GCSE and I'm coping pretty well.

    Concerning Chemistry (AQA), the subject specification is somewhat dense but manageable with a little organisation. The topics are interesting as there are topics previously unmentioned at GCSE and plenty of 'Oh! That's how it works!' moments. If there is an ISA practical skills assessment, which I don't think there is for your year, then be prepared to be scrutinised!

    As for history, I've heard from friends that while it's quite interesting, there is a LOT of note taking and content to learn. Not much more I can say there

    All in all I would suggest German, but with the other two, I would choose which makes you more comfortable. There's no point studying a subject you just want to get get out of.

    Hope this helps
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Siobius)
    Well I'm doing Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics and German with the intention of doing Chemical Engineering at University.
    What I can can say from experience, is that German (OCR) is an absolute Godsend in the middle of all the Maths and Science. Learning a Language is quite relaxing really (I was in a set of 7 people) and just helped me to get settled in A-levels. The exam isn't too challenging, I barely scraped an A* at GCSE and I'm coping pretty well.

    Concerning Chemistry (AQA), the subject specification is somewhat dense but manageable with a little organisation. The topics are interesting as there are topics previously unmentioned at GCSE and plenty of 'Oh! That's how it works!' moments. If there is an ISA practical skills assessment, which I don't think there is for your year, then be prepared to be scrutinised!

    As for history, I've heard from friends that while it's quite interesting, there is a LOT of note taking and content to learn. Not much more I can say there

    All in all I would suggest German, but with the other two, I would choose which makes you more comfortable. There's no point studying a subject you just want to get get out of.

    Hope this helps
    (Sorry to butt in!) About language A levels in general (I assume the courses are fairly similar, just in different languages), how much is it, I guess, like English lessons - I've heard some people say that you have to analyse books and then write about them in the exam, which is something I'm really disliking about GCSE literature. I like using the language to speak and read and write things, but is it like English again, or is it more debating and things like that?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I do History and German and I'm currently in A2 . I am not gonna lie to you I hate history - I sort of did it in the first place because it was either that or carry on with maths haha! But my course is Edexcel late history last year our topics were Stalins Russia, Britain and Civil Rights in America. personally I find it really difficult because it's late history the course covers a lot of economics and politics which can be very boring and there is an insane amount of facts and knowledge mostly on dull economy statistics to learn for the exams! Then again I got an A just overall last year so it can't be that bad!

    German is my favourite subject and I would 100% reccomend ! It's so much more interesting and so refreshing to do alongside my other subjects . It is very hard still, but the lessons are ao fun and as long as you make sure you do vocab little and often which is definately the key to passing a language and keep up with homework it's definately doable and so rewarding . You can use what you learnt from German in real life and go on holiday and speak it and employers love it. I'm actually going to do German and Italian at uni next year aha so I am slightly biast !

    Hope this helped !

    (Original post by ifyouseelaura)
    When I chose my A Level options a few months ago I picked
    Maths - enjoy it, good at it + think its useful
    FM - ditto
    Physics - find it really interesting + think I want to do some sort of physics / engineering at university
    German - have learnt most of AS grammar and content already
    History - find it really interesting

    A few weeks later I switched History for Chemistry, because I though Chemistry would open more doors and go well with Maths / Physics.

    I'm now starting to really doubt whether I want to do Chemistry - I find some of the stuff eg atomic structure + bonding quite interesting, the rest is pretty dull. In contrast, while History might not be that useful in terms of what I want to do in the future, the course looks really interesting, and I'd be sad not to do it, at least to AS. I'm not hugely enthusiastic about German, but my German teacher would be really disappointed if I didn't do it, and you can do some history + culture as part of it. As I have done most of the AS content already, it would be the easiest to get an A in.

    I need to pick two out of History, Chemistry and German. I was wondering if anyone had any opinions on any of those subjects at A Level (particularly Chemistry - how interesting do you find it?). What does anyone suggest I do?

    Sorry this is quite long, but thank you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You're right in that all the language courses are fairly similar they have all got the same structure no matter what language but just differ in things individual to each country .
    It is true that there is an element where you have to study a book or film and write about it but actually it's only a very small part of the whole course! It is very much focused on improving your proficiency in the language I love it
    For AS it's just improving listening reading and writing for the exam on that which is 70% and speaking which is 30% of AS
    Then in A2 there is another speaking exam which is 35% of A2 and then the last written exam where you have a translation, to write an essay on a film or book known to that country, and to write a discursive essay on a controversial topic . And that exams 65% of A2 .
    We did a film for German 'Das Leben Der Anderen' we've not done loads on it in class but just enough I would say . It is sort of similar to GCSE English in te way you analyse the characters or theme or methods but it's such a small part of the course and actually it's not as bad as I thought it would be I love the film we are doing and it's pretty cool to be able to talk about stuff like that in another language

    (Original post by TIF141)
    (Sorry to butt in!) About language A levels in general (I assume the courses are fairly similar, just in different languages), how much is it, I guess, like English lessons - I've heard some people say that you have to analyse books and then write about them in the exam, which is something I'm really disliking about GCSE literature. I like using the language to speak and read and write things, but is it like English again, or is it more debating and things like that?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TIF141)
    (Sorry to butt in!) About language A levels in general (I assume the courses are fairly similar, just in different languages), how much is it, I guess, like English lessons - I've heard some people say that you have to analyse books and then write about them in the exam, which is something I'm really disliking about GCSE literature. I like using the language to speak and read and write things, but is it like English again, or is it more debating and things like that?
    Just about what chlo_backhouse said.

    I guess it actually depends on which board you're with actually .I found the only point where I had to do anything similar at AS to that is the Reading task and the interpretation part of the paper. With OCR MFLs it was just a matter of whether you understood the text and not whether you can interpret, from what I gather from French and German. At A2, you're expected to discuss the ideas from a text so a little more like Lit.

    I think the level that you're supposed to achieve at the end of the A-level is B1-B2 on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, so they're not expecting complete fluency in the language after two years. After all, it'd be quite cruel to set what is done for GCSE Lit. in a different language when the candidate isn't fluent.

    If you're still interested, I suggest having a look at the specification for MFL in the board you're doing it with. It outlines pretty clearly what you're expected to do.
 
 
 

University open days

  1. University of Edinburgh
    All Departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  2. University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  3. Loughborough University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.